Best heating system for a new build house

Zedmeister

Standard Member
I'm planning on building a new house. Its quite large and on 3 floors. I wanted to get your opinion on heating systems. We are on main gas, so the default would be a new condensing boiler with a combination of wet underfloor heating and radiators. Cheap to purchase and cheap to run. Now, are there better alternatives? Air to water heat pumps? Air to air heat pumps (a/c system split with fan units), etc? When I say better, I'm looking at 3 things: installation cost, running costs and then any other advantages (like cooling in the summer). Any advice?
 

outoftheknow

Moderator
Presumably you are first building so heating requirements are minimal? Personal opinion only on underfloor heating is I don’t believe it is the most efficient. Reverse cycle air conditioners are often touted as the cheapest heating - they ar wa heat pump in that mode really - they are quite expensive for cooling though. Also they aren’t gas obviously!

For cooling in Canberra to avoid refrigeration coolers, we enjoy a summer climate that allows evaporative coolers to work really well. Very cheap to run and we then use ducted gas for heating.

Lovers of refrigerants use a ducted reverse cycle system.

We also have a bit more sun so solar panels basically pay for the electricity to run an evaporative cooler - they take a bit of the sting out of the bill for normal A/C too. Also good for hot water (although I prefer and have an instant gas boiler).

Anyway step one IMO is build so heating and cooling needs are minimal.
 

spinaltap

Distinguished Member
The RHI will fund installation of renewable energy for 7 years. Have a look at the Mitsubishi EcoDan AirSource Heat Pump, for example.
 

Zedmeister

Standard Member
Yes, it will be a new building and therefore energy efficient, however I have not gone down the Passivhaus route so demand won't be that minimal. Forgot to mention that its in Hertfordshire UK.
 

outoftheknow

Moderator
Yes, it will be a new building and therefore energy efficient, however I have not gone down the Passivhaus route so demand won't be that minimal. Forgot to mention that its in Hertfordshire UK.
I know it is in the UK :) just giving examples of what works here and should work there.
 

DOBLY

Well-known Member
I would advise getting an energy assessor / adviser to look at your site and liaise with you, the architect & builder to come up with a solution that suits both your current and future needs. You'll kick yourself if spending a bit more up front on advice could save thousands in the medium term.
Are you planning on living there for more than 10 years - if so, investing in an energy solution with a bigger initial cost but lower running costs my suit your circumstances. Generating your own electricity, for example, may be a way of reducing your energy costs over the long term. Supplied energy costs will almost certainly get more expensive.
Will the house have an unobstructed south-facing roof? If so, and it is large enough, consider solar roof tiles or panels. Is there enough room for a ground-source heat-pump solar collector loop in the garden? If so, this may prove less expensive than gas over a 10 year period.
 

Zedmeister

Standard Member
I don't think I have enough space for a ground source heat pump. I think my main options are air to water or air to air heat pumps versus traditional gas condensing boiler. I was wondering, most heat pumps are geared up to produce 40-45C water. How is that sufficient for hot water and heating?
 

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