Best Film Oscar Winners Challenge

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
You didn’t appear to like Lawrence all that much. Why give it top marks?
I'm trying to be as unbiased as I can while scoring them, while still giving my personal taste. I wouldn't say I disliked it, I quite enjoyed it, just not as much as some films which I would still score less than 5.
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
Gigi (1958) - I've previously said I'm going to try not to judge older films by todays moral standards but really hard not to here. The most paedophilic film to win best film at the Oscars.
The film sets the scene with some lecherous old man gazing at a pre pubescent girl while singing a song giving thanks for 5 year old girls because they quickly grow up into women. It doesn't get much better after that. The story is about child prostitution and grooming. A bored middle age rich man who starts off dumping his current mistress, one reason given being she is getting too old. The spurned woman attempts suicide and the rich man is congratulated for this. One bit of enjoyment the poor rich man gets is playing cards with a 15 year old school girl, Gigi, so Gigi's grandmother and great aunt decide to groom her to be his mistress. It isn't successful, at first because apparently the middle aged man prefers her wearing her school uniform than a more grown up look. However they do fall in love and it sort of redeems itself when Gigi is horrified at the prospect of being a mistress so he marries her instead.
The good points - a suberb performance by Leslie Caron. The set and costume design is so wonderful the film looks like a moving life version of a Renoir painting. In many ways though, that makes it even more disturbing as it paints a romanic and idealic view of sexual grooming. 2.5/5
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
A triple bill tonight -

The Bridge on the River Kwai - (1957) - Yes! yes! yes! The best one I have never seen before and what I was hoping for when I started this. Alec Guiness's finest moment. Sessue Hayakawa was brilliant too. 5/5

Around The World In 80 Days
- (1956) - First of all, a crime this beat "Giant". Not going to dwell on it but should have been called "around the world in 80 racial stereotypes!". This was apparently a big budget film for its time. Seemed they spend most of it on extras for a boring, pointless wankfest in Spain, bullfighting. Get the feeling the makers and actors had more fun than anyone watching it. Oh, and I've developed an irrational hatred of Shirley bloody McClaine. At least this should be the last we see of her here, especially with her fading fake and racially offensive Asian tan and spot. 2.5/5

Marty
-(1955) - a surprisingly great, sweet and modern day relevant romantic film. Could do without calling women "dogs" but a very realistic film about a romance between two sweet and awkward people. Ending was rather rushed though. 4.5/5


 
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Fishyrod42

Active Member
Thank you for your opinions. Personally, it wasn't that much of a deal to me, good to hear the opinions of some die hard Platoon fans. There's been far worse racism since, especially the hero of The French Connection being a massive, blatant one but as I said before, prepared to overlook it somewhat, in keeping with the times it was filmed in, for the purpose of my ratings. :)

Anyway, on to the 60s. -

Midnight Cowboy - (1969) - Basically Dustin Hoffman pimps out Angelena Jolie's dad as a male prostitute. Got to give it marks for originality! Extremely seedy, atmospheric with awesome acting and cinematography. I liked it. Deserving of the very first 18 certificate best film Oscar winner. Some of the flashback stuff was a bit confusing as well as the beatnik party. Great film though 4.5/5

Oliver - (1968) - some great acting, brilliant songs but Mark Lester......

dear-oh-dear.gif


Was that his actual singing, as well? It was just as bad as his acting. Cant decide if he was more creepy as a kid or as an adult claiming paternity of Michael Jackson's daughter. 4/5
I am so glad you liked Midnight Cowboy. It's one of my favourites. For me it's one of the most human films out there. Jon Voights character is a damaged soul with the mind of a child, and we see from the flashbacks his inner life and past. He was abandoned by his prostitute mother and given to his grandmother, who was apparently neglectful of him, going out for days at a time and leaving him money for food. She also has lovers stay over, and the film kind of implies some kind of abuse. The flashbacks are there to show that really Joe Buck is all bravado and facade. He doesn't know who he really is. The film is about his search for an identity and family. His cowboy persona had been created by his grandmother, and hes been kind of sexualised from a young age, hence his dream of becoming a hustler. It's a very bleak film injected with humour at certain points too.
The Andy Warhol party in New York seems to serve as counterpoint to the homeless poverty the two are in. These rich trendy young folk dont really understand Ratso and Joe. To them they are just other weirdos that can make up the numbers in their gathering. The middle class artists have plenty of food and dont understand why Ratso would put lots in his pockets, not realising he could be hungry and in want, they are both outsiders but for different reasons.
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
On The Waterfront - (1954) - Yes, Marlon Brando is cool and hard as hell. The ultimate anti hero. Such an awesome film! 5/5

From Here To Eternity
- (1953) - Can't say anything bad about it, can't really say anything good about it, either. An enjoyable enough film. 3/5

The Greatest Show On Earth
- (1952) - Spectacular circus performance and atmosphere of everything surrounding that. The actual story is a bit crap though. 3.5/5
 

Fishyrod42

Active Member
On The Waterfront - (1954) - Yes, Marlon Brando is cool and hard as hell. The ultimate anti hero. Such an awesome film! 5/5

From Here To Eternity
- (1953) - Can't say anything bad about it, can't really say anything good about it, either. An enjoyable enough film. 3/5

The Greatest Show On Earth
- (1952) - Spectacular circus performance and atmosphere of everything surrounding that. The actual story is a bit crap though. 3.5/5
I agree with your reviews here. I think In the Waterfront is one if my favourites. The Leonard Bernstein score is a knockout.
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
An American In Paris - (1951) -Was very disappointed with Leslie Caron who I thought was the best part of Gigi. So wooden here. Otherwise, some pretty decent acting and, come on, Gene Kelly dancing and music by Gershwin, can't go wrong with that. The final dancing was amazing where Caron even showed some chemistry. 4.5/5

All About Eve
- (1950) - Very psychological and great performances here. Marilyn Monroe makes an early appearance. 4.5/5

End of the 50s and my award for best Oscar winning film of this decade goes to On The Waterfront

All the King's Men
- (1949) - some pretty solid acting and story but somehow doesn't quite hit the mark 3.5/5
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
Hamlet - (1948) - I mean, it's written by Shakespeare and stars Laurence Olivier so you can't really go wrong. Somehow this doesn't quite hit the spot, though. For starters, for a film that is done pretty much like an unadulterated play, it cuts half of the original out, including a couple of main characters. Also, I've seen several Shakespeare plays performed at the Globe Theatre and it was much more enjoyable than seeing it done on some grainy old black and white film on telly. 4/5
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
Had some gems to watch last night! -

Gentleman's Agreement - (1947) - Wow! Very ahead of its time about racism, especially anti semitism. Good solid performance from Gregory Peck as a reporter that pretends to be a Jew to write an article on anti semitism in New York. Superb supporting performance from Dean Stockwell as a child as Peck's son, too. 5/5

The Best Years of our Lives
- (1946) - Three socially different men return to their home town from fighting in WWII, one who has lost his hands. A very good and atmospheric film about them trying to readjust to civilian life. 5/5
 
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mtenga

Distinguished Member
Gentleman's Agreement - (1947) - Wow! Very ahead of its time about racism, especially anti semitism. Good solid performance from Gregory Peck as a reporter that pretends to be a Jew to write an article on anti semitism in New York. Superb supporting performance from Dean Stockwell as a child as Peck's son, too. 5/5

Wow never knew the kid was Dean Stockwell. Watched it a few months ago but am going to have to again just for that. Cheers.
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
The Lost Weekend - (1945) - Dark and gritty film about a man being an alcoholic. Somehow it doesn't quite work though, it's very alcoholism paint by numbers. The guy is already an alcoholic but seems to start off being very functional before rapidly descending to the depths in a couple of days before suddenly having an epiphany and being suddenly better. Ray Milland's over the top gurning every time he sees a drink looks something like a Stella Artois advert too. 3/5

Going My Way
- (1944) - Basically this is Dangerous Minds crossed with Ballykissangel and starring Bing Crosby to blatantly show off his singing. Unintentionally hilarious! :rotfl: 3.5/5
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
A triple bill tonight, at least entertaining...

Casablanca - (1943) - A classic film and definitely deserves its legendary status. Great story and great performance, as usual, from Humphrey Bogart 5/5

Mrs Miniver
- (1942) - A blatant war time British propaganda film. It's hard to rate, it's more a piece of social history, really, would give it top marks for propaganda except for one thing - far too little tea drinking and culture. :laugh: The acting and story is probably very slightly above average but going to dock it half a point for its unpatriotic lack of tea. We could have lost the war because of that! 3/5

How Green Was My Valley
- (1941) - Ok, got to start off with how shocking it is this got Best Picture over Citizen Kane and The Maltese Falcon. I'll judge it on its own merit though - starts off rather idealist and whimsical but gets rather dark. Great performance from Roddy McDowall as a child. 4/5
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
Rebecca - (1940) - I've never seen a bad Hitchcock film and this tradition continues. Superb, if rather disturbing and creepy. Great cinematography, acting and suspense. Can't fault it. 5/5

Here ends the 40s. Been pleasantly surprised at how many great Oscar winning films there were in this decade. Was tough choosing the best one, could easily been any one of 4 but just about going to pick Casablanca.

Gone With The Wind - (1939) - I mentioned before, I'm not going to judge old films too harshly on political correctness and certainly not on attitudes and actual history of the times they are representing. This film is still a bit, erm...

3ttNZ9m.gif


That said, there is some good acting, especially from Vivien Leigh. She is so convincingly annoying and spoilt, after over 3 and a half hours you literally punch the air and shout "yes!" when Clark Gable has
enough of her s**t and utters the immortal line "frankly my dear, I don't give a damn!" before walking out and ditching her for good.
4/5
 

RicksonGracie1972

Distinguished Member
Gone With The Wind - (1939) - I mentioned before, I'm not going to judge old films too harshly on political correctness and certainly not on attitudes and actual history of the times they are representing. This film is still a bit, erm...

3ttNZ9m.gif


That said, there is some good acting, especially from Vivien Leigh. She is so convincingly annoying and spoilt, after over 3 and a half hours you literally punch the air and shout "yes!" when Clark Gable has
enough of her s**t and utters the immortal line "frankly my dear, I don't give a damn!" before walking out and ditching her for good.
4/5
Leslie Howard, who played Ashley, used to live in my village. There's a blue plaque on the side of his old Tudor Mansion and apparently original Walt Disney drawings still in the Cinema room.
 

Garrett

Moderator
Leslie Howard, who played Ashley, used to live in my village. There's a blue plaque on the side of his old Tudor Mansion and apparently original Walt Disney drawings still in the Cinema room.
There a lot of speculation about his death i.e. why his plane was shot down, some I knew, there even one he got warned his plane was targeted, but still got onboard so would not let on the enigma code had been broke. :eek:
 

Fishyrod42

Active Member
The Lost Weekend - (1945) - Dark and gritty film about a man being an alcoholic. Somehow it doesn't quite work though, it's very alcoholism paint by numbers. The guy is already an alcoholic but seems to start off being very functional before rapidly descending to the depths in a couple of days before suddenly having an epiphany and being suddenly better. Ray Milland's over the top gurning every time he sees a drink looks something like a Stella Artois advert too. 3/5

Going My Way
- (1944) - Basically this is Dangerous Minds crossed with Ballykissangel and starring Bing Crosby to blatantly show off his singing. Unintentionally hilarious! :rotfl: 3.5/5
The Lost Weekend is an example of a 1940s "message" picture that has aged badly. Ahead of it's time, and in many ways quite honest too. However the acting from Milland is comically pantomime at times. On the plus side it has lots of on location shooting, which was very rare in 40s Hollywood due to expense I suppose. It's a film I really wanted to like because of all the rave reviews it gets.
 

Fishyrod42

Active Member
Rebecca - (1940) - I've never seen a bad Hitchcock film and this tradition continues. Superb, if rather disturbing and creepy. Great cinematography, acting and suspense. Can't fault it. 5/5

Here ends the 40s. Been pleasantly surprised at how many great Oscar winning films there were in this decade. Was tough choosing the best one, could easily been any one of 4 but just about going to pick Casablanca.

Gone With The Wind - (1939) - I mentioned before, I'm not going to judge old films too harshly on political correctness and certainly not on attitudes and actual history of the times they are representing. This film is still a bit, erm...

3ttNZ9m.gif


That said, there is some good acting, especially from Vivien Leigh. She is so convincingly annoying and spoilt, after over 3 and a half hours you literally punch the air and shout "yes!" when Clark Gable has
enough of her s**t and utters the immortal line "frankly my dear, I don't give a damn!" before walking out and ditching her for good.
4/5
Personally my objections over GWTW are not over racial stereotypes ( I dont think it's any worse than alot of movies at that time.) No I dont like it because it's a bloated soap opera and tedious imo. However the cinematography is excellent and holds up well.
 

Tom Davies

Editorial Contributor
Gone With The Wind - (1939) - I mentioned before, I'm not going to judge old films too harshly on political correctness and certainly not on attitudes and actual history of the times they are representing. This film is still a bit, erm...

That said, there is some good acting, especially from Vivien Leigh. She is so convincingly annoying and spoilt, after over 3 and a half hours you literally punch the air and shout "yes!" when Clark Gable has
A gorgeous piece of epic historical melodrama.
The problems you mention are not to be handwaved (and definitely not to be defended), but viewed in its context, it's pretty progressive in other ways, particularly its depiction of women. I think it's one of the most important pieces of Western cinematic history we have.
You're right that almost nobody in the film is even approaching likeable but as a whole I'm a defender of it.
 

Garrett

Moderator
A gorgeous piece of epic historical melodrama.
The problems you mention are not to be handwaved (and definitely not to be defended), but viewed in its context, it's pretty progressive in other ways, particularly its depiction of women. I think it's one of the most important pieces of Western cinematic history we have.
You're right that almost nobody in the film is even approaching likeable but as a whole I'm a defender of it.
When you watch old films you have to accept the period they were made in.
e.g. you never have likes Laurence Olivia blacking up as in Khartoum(or at least I'd hope not) but that was then and this is now.
Mind you back than like in Notorious Cary and Ingrid could not kiss for over a second now even the kitchen sink and even on it goes. :rotfl:
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
Personally my objections over GWTW are not over racial stereotypes ( I dont think it's any worse than alot of movies at that time.) No I dont like it because it's a bloated soap opera and tedious imo. However the cinematography is excellent and holds up well.

A gorgeous piece of epic historical melodrama.
The problems you mention are not to be handwaved (and definitely not to be defended), but viewed in its context, it's pretty progressive in other ways, particularly its depiction of women. I think it's one of the most important pieces of Western cinematic history we have.
You're right that almost nobody in the film is even approaching likeable but as a whole I'm a defender of it.
Too be honest, it wasn't the racial stereotypes I found too bad, except for Prissy who was like a female Jar Jar Binks. It was way over the top glorifying slavery and the Confederacy which was a bit, hmmm, which was what I was more talking about.
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
You Can't Take It With You - (1938) - Enjoyable enough, feel good, romantic comedy about an eccentric family. Felt a bit like an urban version of the Darling Buds of May, in places. Pretty good performances from James Stewart and Lionel Barrymore 3.5/5

The Life of Emile Zola
- (1937) - The first half an hour feels rather rushed but pretty compelling enough after that when it gets into the whole Dreyfus affair. The huge problem with it is it doesn't once mention Jews or anti semitism. :facepalm:How does that work? It's like making a film about Pele and white washing football out of it. 2.5/5
 

Fishyrod42

Active Member
You Can't Take It With You - (1938) - Enjoyable enough, feel good, romantic comedy about an eccentric family. Felt a bit like an urban version of the Darling Buds of May, in places. Pretty good performances from James Stewart and Lionel Barrymore 3.5/5

The Life of Emile Zola
- (1937) - The first half an hour feels rather rushed but pretty compelling enough after that when it gets into the whole Dreyfus affair. The huge problem with it is it doesn't once mention Jews or anti semitism. :facepalm:How does that work? It's like making a film about Pele and white washing football out of it. 2.5/5
I know the absence of Jewish identity in the Zola biopic is jarring. Most Hollywood studios in the golden age were run by Jewish moguls, Louis B. Mayer MGM, Jack Warner Warner bros,Harry cohn Columbia etc. Ive read that they were very cautious of showing anything related to semitism for some reason.
 

Fishyrod42

Active Member
When you watch old films you have to accept the period they were made in.
e.g. you never have likes Laurence Olivia blacking up as in Khartoum(or at least I'd hope not) but that was then and this is now.
Mind you back than like in Notorious Cary and Ingrid could not kiss for over a second now even the kitchen sink and even on it goes. :rotfl:
Who knows in 30 or 40 years time maybe blackface will come back? Hope not, but I've realised that human life isn't always about linear progression. Morality goes round in cycles.
 

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