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Best DVD Recorder for Camcorder transfer and editing?

wyerstuff

Standard Member
Hi there folks, this is my first post here.

I,m looking for a bit of advice, a few months back i bought Pinnacle Studio 9 software and a 250GB external hard-drive with the intention of transferring my analogue and digital camcorder tapes to DVD on my computer and also do a bit of editing.
After playing with it for a few nights i soon realised that it is actually quite a long and complex process which i really haven't got the time for, as well as that the software kept crashing and freezing and i sort of gave up on it.

My question is :- Is there a DVD recorder on the market which would suit my needs, which are to have a piece of kit with which i can easily an quickly transfer my analogue 8mm tapes and my digital tapes (via my Canon MV600i) to DVD, with maybe a bit of minor editing ?

Steve
 

maldonian

Active Member
Hi Steve. Welcome to the forum.

Is there a DVD recorder on the market which would suit my needs, which are to have a piece of kit with which i can easily an quickly transfer my analogue 8mm tapes and my digital tapes (via my Canon MV600i) to DVD, with maybe a bit of minor editing ?
Get one with a hard disk and it's a doddle. They are easy and quick to use. The editing is limited compared with a PC - no cross fades for example, just cuts - but you can divide recordings and delete parts of recordings. Or you can use a playlist to splice together selected sections from multiple recordings, in any order, without affecting the original recordings (i.e. non-destructive editing). You dub (copy) the playlist to create the edited recording. When you burn a DVD a simple but adequate menu with thumbnails and titles is created.

Some recorders have a DV in connector for connecting digital camcorders (aka firewire or i.link) but they tend to be a bit more expensive. You might be equally happy with recordings made using an AV lead, which you can do using any recorder. (You will have to use an AV lead for the 8mm tapes.)

Panasonic recorders are popular. I've got two and I have no hesitation in recommending them. They are easy to use and the recording quality is very good. But Pioneers, Toshibas and Sonys are popular too. Toshibas have a reputation for being more versatile, but possibly not quite so easy to use. I've also seen quite a few complaints that they are a bit noisy. One JVC recorder (DR-MH300) has DV out as well as DV in and a native DV recording mode, so you can edit recordings on the hard disk and transfer them back to a tape in the camcorder.

Ian
 
D

drivingmemental

Guest
Hi there

I'm new on here too and have a similar requirement with a few others! I have spent the last 2-3 hours reading through a lot of threads on this forum and am completely and utterly confused. Why can't it be simple like it was in the old days - there was VHS and Betamax; Betamax pretty much died & VHS ruled. Easy!

Well, 2 of the 3 video recorders around the house have now broken and the last remaining machine is decidedly sickly, so time to move on.

Current setup is: VHS video recorder, DVD player, NTL Digital TV, Phillips Widescreen TV

I'm trying not to worry myself about too many of the technicalities. I find the number of connections and formats almost overwhelming, I suppose because I've kind of switched off for the last few years as these things have evolved. Don't get me wrong, I'm no techno-phobe - I can deal with most aspects of PC & Computing technology and also INAP & TCAP (telco stuff!); it just seems that I have a blind spot when it comes to tv/audio technology! I just want to be able to do the following, quickly & easily!

1. Record programmes from either Analogue TV or NTL Digitial service onto a hard drive & either watch them at a later date or perhaps store on a DVD.

2. Edit whatever is on the HDD (have decided on 160GB minimum) and store on a DVD

3. Connect VHS video recorder to the DVD Recorder, copy video content onto the HDD and store on a DVD.

4. Copy content from Digitial Video Camera onto the HDD, perhaps edit and store on a DVD.

5. Be able to store stuff on a DVD and then add more content to the same DVD at a later date.

And that's about it. I know there's probably hundreds of other things I could want a machine to do, but I like simplicity - after all, a VCR only really needs a play button, a record button and a rewind button...and perhaps a timer!

I've looked at a few likely candidates (listed below), but am struggling on the pro's and con's of each. I also have a real dilemma on whether to go for a machine with HDMI output capability? I do intend to by an HD ready LCD TV, but that could be anytime between now and 18 months time, as I've had to promise to decorate the lounge first! Funny how the DVD Recorder was also going to have to wait until then, but now appears to have become a matter of utmost urgency due to what 'she' needs to watch!

JVC DR-MH300
SAMSUNG DVD-HR725
LG RH-7900H
LG-RH-7850H
Pioneer DVR-530H
Sony RDR-HXD710

Any other suggestions or feedback appreciated! :lease:

Cheers
Ashley
 

maldonian

Active Member
Hi drivingmemental

Any DVD recorder with a hard disk drive will do what you want. I haven't used any of the models you listed, so I can't really compare them. My inclination would be to choose from the leading Japanese makes - Panasonic, Pioneer, Toshiba, Sony, JVC. You can search the forum for threads about specific makes and models, to see what users think of them. (Click on Search near the top of this page and select Advanced Search.)

A large hard disk sounds appealing, but if you fill it up that's a lot of TV to watch, or lot of work needed to edit it all and transfer it to DVD. With a smaller hard disk you're more likely to stay on top of it. Plus I'd rather have two 80 Gb recorders than one 160 Gb recorder, for when programmes clash. (In fact I have got two 80 Gb recorders.)

I wouldn't worry about HDMI. It's intended for HD sources, not SD (and for copy protection). An HD TV will upscale standard definition inputs, so why upscale in the recorder? If you do, the TV might still need to rescale to it's native definition, in which case the signal will be rescaled twice.

but I like simplicity - after all, a VCR only really needs a play button, a record button and a rewind button...and perhaps a timer!
A DVD/HDD recorder is simpler - there's no rewind button.
 
D

drivingmemental

Guest
Thanks Maldonian.

I've had a good look around and read a lot of reviews and stuff the last couple of days and have narrowed it down to two, at opposite ends of the spectrum.

I either go in at the bottom end of the market with a YAMADA DVR-9000H which is sub £150 from Maplin's and seems to do the core stuff okay from what I've read, given the price.

Or I aim higher with the SONY RDR-HXD710. I like this machine a lot from what I've read. It has DV Input for the camcorder stuff, but no DV Output, which I think I can live with. There's also no HDMI, but I don't think that's a massive issue either.

Plus points for the Sony are the 160GB HD, the Freeview digital tuner and apparent ease of use. It's more than I wanted to pay though, but I get the feeling it will be worth it. I'm just waiting for someone to tell me there's something fundamental I've missed and then I'll have to start the process of review-reading all over again, or just think 'sod it' and buy the YAMADA!

Cheers
 

maldonian

Active Member
have narrowed it down to two, at opposite ends of the spectrum.
Yes, definitely extremes, but that might make the decision easier.

I can't comment on the Yamada, other than I'd be very wary of the cheap brands (actually I'd be more than wary, I wouldn't buy one). Cheap recorders tend to be based on the +R format, whereas, apart from Philips, the leading brands are -R based, though they've added support for +R in recent models. I haven't noticed many Yamada users on the forum.

Sony have a good reputation and users on the forum seem to be mostly pleased with them, so I'm sure you'd be very happy with the 710. Note that their Freeview models don't have analogue tuners, so you would need to be in an area with good Freeview reception.

It has DV Input for the camcorder stuff, but no DV Output, which I think I can live with.
I suspect the JVC MH300 is the only recorder with DV Out. It can record in native DV (25 Mb/s), so you can edit camcorder footage on the hard disk then transfer it back to a tape in the camcorder.

There's also no HDMI, but I don't think that's a massive issue either.
HDMI is intended for connecting HD equipment with strong copyright protection. I have yet to be convinced that there's any need for it in a standard definition recorder, though I notice the new range of Panasonics will use it to control other equipment.
 
D

drivingmemental

Guest
Cheers again for the reply Maldonian. The Sony is on order from Amazon at a shade under £400, but with delivery time of 4-6 weeks, it seems to indicate they are gambling on getting more stock - we shall see!:rolleyes:
 

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