Benq w1070 tweak or not?

Davek0974

Active Member
Hi all, I have a w1070 in a dedicated cinema room, permanent screen.

Is it worth getting a DVE disc and tweaking things?
Are there gains to be had above the standard setup?

Just wondering as its money wasted if not that's all


Thanks
Dave
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
Definitely.

Two of the most important settings that need to be correctly set up are the brightness and contrast - there is no real 'standard' setting for these as they are system dependant. If you set the brightness too low, you will crush shadow detail and lose picture information. If you set it too high, you will raise the black level so blacks look greyer than they should and you will reduce on/off contrast. Contrast when set wrong can either reduce on/off contrast or will blow out bright detail.

Have a look at the link in my sig. It's a bit old now, but the videos especially will show you what needs to be done and why.

Gary
 

Davek0974

Active Member
Thanks Gary, can you answer a couple more q's while i get a DVE disk on order...

Does the DVE disk have to be run from a DVD player or can i rip it and use an uncompressed file???

Does it have instructions or is it merely a massive set of test screens and patterns???


Thanks
 

Chester Pete

Active Member
Hi all, I have a w1070 in a dedicated cinema room, permanent screen.

Is it worth getting a DVE disc and tweaking things?
Are there gains to be had above the standard setup?

Just wondering as its money wasted if not that's all

Thanks
Dave

For me its not worth it YMMV. I've tried various options and found that I could not get it looking better (even with the free setup stuff provided with Disney Bluray discs)
Now that I've got quite a few hours on the lamp, the brightness has settled down a bit and I use the following quite happily.
- Cinema mode
- Smart Eco lamp setting
- 2.4 Gamma
- Turn off Brilliant Colour

I tried using an ND2 filter to lower the "Black Floor" but I didn't like the picture colours being dulled - so now I use it without.

TBH, I doubt you will improve the picture much from the above.
I found there was a bigger effect on PQ from the correct positioning of projector to screen (sharpness across image).
 

Davek0974

Active Member
Thanks Chester,

I also have an ageing plasma I hope to tune up a bit so it will be used more than once. I agree that the picture on the DLP is excellent and I'm not expecting miracles but it can't hurt I check stuff out.

Picture geometry is 100% so no worries there.
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
Thanks Gary, can you answer a couple more q's while i get a DVE disk on order...

Does the DVE disk have to be run from a DVD player or can i rip it and use an uncompressed file???

Does it have instructions or is it merely a massive set of test screens and patterns???


Thanks

You can rip it if you like (I do too), but how it's played back can make a difference, depending on the software player you use. I think these days you'll probably be OK though (video levels are different to PC levels - see my link for more info). I used to use a different test disk to DVE (didn't like the menu system for a start) and there is an AVS downloadable disk that's free here:

AVS HD 709 - Blu-ray & MP4 Calibration

I always used a PC (HTPC) to playback movies etc, and it's my preferred method, plus you can store your favourite movies/demos etc so they're always to hand. Is that what you're going to do?

Read through the link in my sig, and watch the video that's linked to in there and you'll see why it's so important to set the brightness and contrast:

http://www.avforums.com/forums/video-productions/813910-tutorial-basic-tv-calibration.html

Having said that, not everyone knows they're missing image detail or when things are wrong in their image, so ignorance can be bliss :)

Gary
 

Davek0974

Active Member
Thanks Gary,

Yes I was thinking of ripping an uncompressed mkv file off the disc and using that, but my player does not have chapter/menu screens so maybe it won't work?

I can always dig out the DVD player and hook that up so no worries.

The media player is called Plex and I run on mac mini's via DV-HDMI connection.
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
You'll probably have to calibrate each source separately as the outputs may vary, so if you set the brightness for one, it may be different for another. Try it first to see. It's usually a problem with analogue and less so with digital.

Setting up for the DVD player won't necessarily be correct for your media player. If you can navigate directly to a chapter, you might be able to do it that way.

I seem to remember only ripping certain chapters, so if you could do that, and have them on the media player as two different videos (one brightness, the other contrast), then that should work.

Gary.
 
Last edited:

KelvinS1965

Distinguished Member
I saw this earlier but didn't have time to find the AVS HD709 link that Gary has since posted. :smashin:

I have various discs such as DVE, Spears and Munsil and the AVS HD 709 one. The HD709 is the one I always go back to and the others rarely even come out of their boxes. I think that says it all really.
 

Amesy

Active Member
My settings are very similar to Chester Pete's. I also don't like using the Filter. Soupdragon gave a comprehensive explanation about the impact of using one in a BenQ 1070 thread. I think Dan likes his, so it is all down to personal preference and each room.
 

Davek0974

Active Member
I know I don't need to worry about an nd filter, brightness is fine and am surprised that some users go that way, surely a lower gain screen would be better?

There is the 3d side though which I'm not worried about, could be a reasoning guess for sticking with a higher gain screen.
 

Dan L

Active Member
Yeah, 99% of my viewing is at night, in a lightly decorated room with the lights off, and the filter makes a big difference IMO and gives a preferable picture. It is useless for day viewing or for watching 3D films though, thankfully it's easy to remove.

Low gain screen probably would have been a better choice, but I had already rushed into buying a white screen and the filter was a cheaper option for me.

Now I know I like projection, that's an upgrade for the future ;)
 

Davek0974

Active Member
Well I've had a cursory 10 minute play with DVE and what can I say, the picture seems to be perfect straight out of the box on the 1070.

It does appear I have video clipping somewhere in my system as I'm not getting the "below black" levels showing up, will check that again.

I'll have more time to play on Saturday, will do some studying up until then, also be able to check out the old plasma tv then.
 

Triggaaar

Distinguished Member
I'm using the BenQ W1070 with a PC - is there any good free calibration software for PCs (equivalent to something like DVE, but for PCs instead of disc players)?

Thanks
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
You can use DVE or similar test disk in a PC using your usual software player like PowerDVD etc, and then calibrate from there as normal. That way you're using the same levels in the players 'overlay' so they will be correct for the other disks or media you use.

Gary
 

Triggaaar

Distinguished Member
You can use DVE or similar test disk in a PC using your usual software player like PowerDVD etc, and then calibrate from there as normal. That way you're using the same levels in the players 'overlay' so they will be correct for the other disks or media you use.
Thanks, but I don't use disk media at all. My setup is for showing photos from my laptop. Any ideas of a good way to calibrate?
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
You'll probably need something like a test pattern that shows all RGB levels from 0 to 255, and set the brightness and contrast so that all values are visible and not crushed into one (i.e 0 and 1 are visible, and 254 and 255 are too). You'll probably have to google for it, and use the pattern in the program you use to display the photo's.

Gary
 

Triggaaar

Distinguished Member
You'll probably need something like a test pattern that shows all RGB levels from 0 to 255, and set the brightness and contrast so that all values are visible and not crushed into one (i.e 0 and 1 are visible, and 254 and 255 are too).
Thanks for the reply. Given how simple the brightness and contrast adjustments are, I assume I won't need every level from 0 to 255. I'll see what I can find, and if I don't find what I'm after, I'll make something in Photoshop.

use the pattern in the program you use to display the photo's.
Yep, will do.

What about colour adjustments? My lcd calibrator won't help me, and I've never done colour adjustmens manually before. Any tips there?
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
With video on a PJ, we use one of the standards like rec709, but for photos, you may need to do some research to see what gamut and colour matrix would best represent your photos. I seem to remember something like Adobe or RGB/sRGB being standards for images so you may want to Google those. Getting the grey scale correct from black to white is important for us, so I assume it would work much the same for you. It ensures that the mix of rgb is correct from black to white so all images care the correct colour throughout the range.

Gary
 

Triggaaar

Distinguished Member
With video on a PJ, we use one of the standards like rec709
Never heard of it.
but for photos, you may need to do some research to see what gamut and colour matrix would best represent your photos. I seem to remember something like Adobe or RGB/sRGB being standards for images
Mine are set to sRGB, but I could easily use Adobe RGB if it made displaying them better. I know my photo colours, but I've never used a projector before, and haven't a clue about calibrating one.

Getting the grey scale correct from black to white is important for us, so I assume it would work much the same for you. It ensures that the mix of rgb is correct from black to white so all images care the correct colour throughout the range.
When I auto calibrate my monitors, they display the colours as well as the shades of grey, and that's what I've seen when I've seen a plasma calibrated. Do they calibrate a projector without displaying colours? I appreciate that making grey grey is a good start, that's what I'd do with a photo to get a correct white balance, but there's normally more to calibrating than that.

Are there any tools I can use, or is it simply displaying some test patterns, and adjusting by eye?
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
You can adjust by eye, but ideally you need a colorimiter orsimilar plus some software to balance the rgb to the standard you want to use. Free software like HCFR should be OK to get you going. Getting the greys correct to the colour temp you require is important as grey is just white at a different luminance or brightness level. It can be a lot of fun, plus you know that your colours are being displayed correctly on your monitor. A PJ is just like any monitor really, so transferring what you used to do on your monitor should transfer to the PJ.
 

razy60

Well-known Member
@Triggaaar, If your using a PC and don't want/can't burn to disc then use imgburn or the windows .iso creation tool, create the .iso file then use mounting software, DVDfab virtual drive or daemon tools to mount and run the image.
 

Triggaaar

Distinguished Member
Thank you for the help.
A PJ is just like any monitor really, so transferring what you used to do on your monitor should transfer to the PJ.
My monitors have automatic hardware calibration, I just stick a calibrator on the front and they do all the work, so I've no real practical experience in doing calibration. I'll have a look at HCFR, thanks.

If your using a PC and don't want/can't burn to disc then use imgburn or the windows .iso creation tool, create the .iso file then use mounting software, DVDfab virtual drive or daemon tools to mount and run the image.
It's not that I don't want to or can't burn a disc, but more that I won't use a disc to display images when finished, so perhaps I'd be better using my display software to display test images, so once calibrated, my displayed images will look right.
I probably don't want to buy a specific projector calibrator, so I just need to find the right test images, display them with my existing software, and learn what to do with the projectors settings to get it looking good.
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
There is a calibration guide for dummies on the calibration forum, so that might be worth a look, but it's more geared up for calibrating for video, so probably none of the standards will apply. The methodology will probably be the same though.

Gary
 

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