Bel Canto eVo

lowrider

Standard Member
I am extremely tempted to order, (without ever listening to one), an eVo 6 x 120 or 3 x 360 bridged, (the way I will be using it), to replace my Brystons... :rolleyes:

Am I crazy or what, there is no dealer in Portugal, or in Spain, so it is the only way I can put my hands on one... :suicide:

Anyone here experienced this powers, or other so called digital amplifiers, are they all it is said about them... :confused:
 

lowrider

Standard Member
Apparently they are more popular across the pond, I wonder why... :rolleyes:

I still want one... :suicide:
 

mutley

Standard Member
Bridged? :eek:

Am i hearing this from you? :devil:
 

lowrider

Standard Member
Yes, thats what I thought too... :eek:

But I did read about their powers, apparently they where made as a fully balanced mono that can be split into two stereo, so it actually sounds better, less distortion and less noise bridged... :suicide:
 

lowrider

Standard Member
I couldn´t resist and ordered an evo 6 without listening first... :blush:
 

lowrider

Standard Member
Apparently no one is interested in this power, but here it goes anyway... :lesson:

After the 40 hours they reckon necessary for the chips to learn about the other components and settle, but well before the one month recomended play to be fully run-in, here goes my first impressions:

With Krell plus Bryston, bass mids and highs compete for protagonism, every note stands up and grabs your attention, with the Bel Canto, the music flows coherent, still, if you look, you can hear the bass authoritary and very well controlled, even better than with Bryston, lots of detail and air through the whole range, and extended highs, scintilant, but never harsh...

Still, there is a small problem, less body, maybe because the bass is so well controled it sounds less proeminent...

By the way, the missus who didnt like it being polished aluminum, (every thing else is black), said I will prove it is worst than the Bryston, just play "Crouching tiger and ... dragon"...

She thought it would be dull reproducing special effects, but she was in for a surprise, the swords clashing and the chairs and floor beeing smashed sounded as lively, or more, then with the Bryston...

But I have to admit the cello in the end was less enveloping than before, (today it was already better), after all its only 2 days old, it can only improve with some more time... :smoke:
 

Peter Baker

Novice Member
Sounds a really great amp Antonio. I too thought the Bryston a bit too detailed for me.
I have decided to go with the Proceed, which sounds like it may be similar to the Bel Canto. Lots of detail, but presented as a really coherent, rich whole, rather than a series of different highlights.
The bass may not be as tight as the Bel Canto, but is very satisfying.
With HT the sound envelopes the room, really giving a 'being there' feeling. And thats without PrologicII

Peter
 

lowrider

Standard Member
Originally posted by Peter Baker
Sounds a really great amp Antonio. I too thought the Bryston a bit too detailed for me.

The Bel Canto is even more detailed, but in a more relaxed way... :smashin:
 

Daneel

Active Member
How much did these cost if you don't mind me asking. Does anyone know if they are available in the UK?
 

lowrider

Standard Member
They cost 5.000 US$ in the states, probably around 5.000 pounds in the UK... :rolleyes:

I imported direct because there is no dealer in Portugal... :smoke:
 

lowrider

Standard Member
After another week playing TV I auditioned it properly again...

Fantastic how clean, controled and detailed the whole range is, bass, mids and highs, even with discs I thought where not well recorded...

Incredible how it eliminates, or doesn´t introduce, any harshness, for instance Rabih Abou-Khalil, "The Cactus of knowledge", before sounded agressive, lots of brass, now even the missus heard it without complaining...

Final test, piano, Arthur Lima playing danças brasileiras from Ernesto Nazareth, it sounded like a Steinway again, great body and shivering, still sweet, highs... :clap:
 

GaryG

Member
Okay Antonio

I'll give you some feedback on Bel Canton. I auditioned the Evo 2 last week against a pair of my 'surround' monoblocs. After all the praise on certain other forums about how this amp is better than a NAP 500 I can only say that I'm mystified as to what is so good about it.
 

lowrider

Standard Member
Hi Gary,

I never heard the Naim, if you follow my posts, you will realise it wasn´t that good the day I opened the box, but after two weeks it is very, very good, maybe the one you heard hadn´t played enough yet... :smashin:

Also, I am using it bridged, 3 x 360 watts, and if you read that praise, they say it is much better this way...:smoke:
 

buns

Banned
why do you decide to bridge? In most instances, this is considered inferior since it limits the amps power handling abilities

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GaryG

Member
Hi Antonio

I've been following your posts, is the mid-range more to your liking now?

With regard to the sound quality I think the Bel Canto has a completely different sound to Naim, it's more in line with Chord which I suspect is why it's popular with some people more than others.

I think you got a good deal on your amp, the UK retail price of the 2 channel version puts it in a category where there are other amps at a similar price which fare better, at the US price I would think it is a pretty good deal.

Are you going to try some of Tony' mods on you version? A good sprinkling of 'Black Gate' caps should work wonders!
 

lowrider

Standard Member
Originally posted by buns
why do you decide to bridge? In most instances, this is considered inferior since it limits the amps power handling abilities

You are right regarding some cases, even most cases, but Bel Canto makes their powers in a way that when bridging it becomes fully balanced and one gets less noise and distortion, as well as more power of course, apparently Krell does the same... :rolleyes:

Gary,

Its sound is just what I like, very good frequency extension, bass and treble, PRAT, detail, stage, but no harshness at all, best of two worlds, I´d say...

I got it for half what it will cost here when there is a distributor, I guess with this price it is a tough act to follow, actually, it is any way, and only two weeks old... :smoke:

Opening my FMJ DV27 to stick a sheet of Stillpoints ERS, is as far as I will ever go tweaking equipment inside, I think... :rotfl:
 

lowrider

Standard Member
Originally posted by buns
oh ok, i'll take your word on that point!

Dont, I am no engineer... ;)

Quote:

Another unique design feature of the eVo amplifiers is their "dual-channel boards" which operate in "anti-phase" to reduce low-frequency power-supply modulation, in effect increasing the performance of the power supply. And when an eVo is operated in bridged-mono mode, it becomes a fully balanced differential amplifier. This further reduces low-frequency power-supply noise and increases common-mode rejection to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, meaning a quieter amplifier. In addition to these advantages, in bridged mode, output power almost triples, which would aid in driving less-efficient speakers.
 

lowrider

Standard Member
More:

Also, it is worth reiterating Perry's assertions that the eVo sounds better bridged than in stereo, because I believe this is the heart of what makes the eVo so special. Typically when an amp is bridged, its distortion doubles along with a theoretical quadrupling of output wattage. Bel Canto chose to run each stereo pair of channels out of phase with each other so as to minimize the power supply demands and to maximize power efficiency and performance. In stereo mode, one of the output wires is reversed so that the channels are brought back to proper phase alignment. I don't know if this has anything to do with the digital nature of the amp, but few designs incorporate this principle. When bridged, however, the unit becomes balanced bridged (AKA differential bridged, AKA balanced output), meaning that not only is the output wattage increased, but also one channel is driving the positive lead of the speaker while the other channel is simultaneously driving the negative lead of the speaker. My understanding is that this is different from standard bridged designs, which drive the positive and negative slopes of the signal waveform, but not the positive and negative speaker terminals. Like the out of phase power supply, very few other designs have used this method either. Sumo amplifiers used to do this, and Krell and some Mark Levinson designs use it as well. I can even remember a few years back that MIT and Spectral had some wiring mechanism which allowed Spectral amps to be balanced-bridged via speaker cables, and they made some pretty lofty claims about the resulting sound improvements. I also noticed that REL subwoofers have a separate balanced-bridged speaker-level input on their pricier model subwoofers. I don't understand why this setup isn't used more often, because the results are spectacular.
 

lowrider

Standard Member
3 weeks, and it is already the best sound I have ever heard anywhere, not live, of course... :clap:

I am most amazed with the bass, and the Bryston was no slouch, with the sweetness of mids and highs, and with the sence of space around each instrument or singer, even playing at lowish volumes, amazing... :eek:

Not so good recordings also sound more detailed and cleaner, I wonder why, it must be the total absence of harshness and ressonances... :rolleyes:
 

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