bedroom glamour pic advice - no pics in thread!!!

shaolin101

Active Member
Just after a bit of advice – as usual!

Looking to set up a small bedroom studio for ahem, “those type of pictures”. Classy one of course – nothing slutty ;)

Its only for fun between me and the missus so nothing major going on. I have a Nikon D50 but only with the kit lens. Would this be suitable to use? What else should I go for. There is a normal light bulb above the bed and the windows/balcony door will be covered with the curtains. Any cheap lighting suggestions? Any other stuff I could do with – remembering its nothing professional.

Thanks
 

ush flynn

Novice Member
light above the bed is likely to cause horrible shadows and most likely a very warm colour cast. What kinda classy are we talking about here, could candle light be an option? you could get tons and use longer exposures as long as there s no movement, say no more say no more.
The kit lens will do an ok job, nothing special, a longer lens like an 85mm or 100 mm might be too long to use in a bedroom as its likely you cant get far enough from your subject, unless your going for those part of the body shots rather than trying to get more of her in the picture. With the poor lighting it might be worth shooting in black and white, or at least with the aim of producing monochrome shots!
 

h4rri

Novice Member
Yeah, tell you what send some test shots over so we can comment on the best light placement etc ;)

Seriously though if they are for 'your eyes only' why bother with a studio, just stick the camera on a tripod, grab the remote and crack on ;)
 
I

imcarm

Guest
h4rri said:
grab the remote and crack on ;)
Lol and if you don't have a remote then I'm sure I can be "easily" persuaded to press the button for you! (no pun intended) :rotfl:
 

shaolin101

Active Member
I meant studio in the loosest senso of the term - as in an indoor place where pictures are being taken!

I like the candle idea. Its jsut to practice that style of portrait type stuff you see showing curves of the body - black and white sounds liek it would work with it.

It was the August Practical Photography that inspired me to have a go - but i dont have big lights and reflectors etc.
 

h4rri

Novice Member
Depends on where you want the light source, use a couple of bedside style lamps to introduce light and focus the shadows where they need to be. Us low wattage bulbs to soften the light.

You don't need alot of expensive kit for the range of shots you're after, one suggestion would be to make sure the 'model' is suitably positioned and have a draped sheet to ensure no clutter [bedside table etc] in the shot.
 

shaolin101

Active Member
Thanks for the tips - will look out for a 50mm 1.8 lens.

Sorry for the newb/dunce question but if a lens says 50mm is that how close i can get to the subject and still have it in focus? Or is it nothing to do with it!
 

steve.o

Novice Member
shaolin101 said:
Sorry for the newb/dunce question but if a lens says 50mm is that how close i can get to the subject and still have it in focus? Or is it nothing to do with it!
It's more to do with the specific lens, the canon 50mm f1.8 has a closest focusing distance of 45cm / 17.7"

Generally a longer focal length lens will have a longer closest focus distance. The canon 1200mm is 14m / 46ft! :eek:

...steve.o
 

dave_bass5

Well-known Member
I would say the best thing you can get is an external flash. if you bounce it off the wall or ceiling you will get a nice balance. The kit lens will be fine but if you need a faster lens just get your model to hold still a bit longer (unless its one of those poses that can hurt after a few seconds:D )
 

KeenDean

Novice Member
What about a cheaper option of buying a 50mm f/1.8 from the likes of onestop-digital , which would allow you to shoot with just natural light from a window. Much more natural looking :)
 

lmccauley

Well-known Member
shaolin101 said:
Thanks for the tips - will look out for a 50mm 1.8 lens.

Sorry for the newb/dunce question but if a lens says 50mm is that how close i can get to the subject and still have it in focus? Or is it nothing to do with it!
50mm is the focal length of the lens. It, along with the dimensions of the sensor or film determine the angle of view or field of view that you will see when you look through the lens.

Basically, 50mm is "normal" (actually about 34mm is "normal" for a D50), anything less than that is wide-angle, and anything more than that is telephoto. Because the D50 has a smaller sensor than a 35mm film, 50mm will be slightly telephoto.

Cheers,
Liam
 

dave_bass5

Well-known Member
KeenDean said:
What about a cheaper option of buying a 50mm f/1.8 from the likes of onestop-digital , which would allow you to shoot with just natural light from a window. Much more natural looking :)
Unless you take them at night of course;)
 

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