BBC1: The Truth About Sports Products

GBDG1

Distinguished Member
I just hope it's a proper program, and not one of these BS documentaries. I'd like to see proper scientific analysis of how these things work for athletes/serious amateurs/amateurs/casuals. I'd like discussion of the benefits over alternatives, and advice about what best to do - should I buy lucozade when i'm off on a 6 hour bike ride, or can I get by with adding some salt, honey, lemon and sugar to normal cordial?

With regards to protein shakes - anyone with an ounce of knowledge knows that they are not a magic potion. If the programme concludes that they are no better than normal food - how about an analysis of how they compare price wise. because I would be grateful to hear a cheaper way to get in 30g - 50g of protein with zero preparation or cooking.

What i suspect will happen is some irritating presenter will run for 2 minutes on a tread mill. Then drink a lucozade and not run it any faster. From there they will derive that it doesn't work. Cut to a story about a 25 stone man who drinks 8 litres of lucozade per day, then some stuff about marketing of sports drinks. Next they'll interview the chief executive of Pepsi, who will skillfully avoid all questions. Then some tie in to the Olympics.

If you've ever run for 60 - 70 minutes or ridden a bike hard for 3 or 4 hours then had a sugary sports drink, you don't need anyone to tell you whether it works, because you will be able to tell very very quickly that it does (then again, Jelly Babies so as well..)! Does it justify the £1 price tag for what is probably £0.05 worth of sugary liquid? Probably not, but then again, it saves me the effort of carrying it with me on a run (which I hate), so I can live with it.

I should probably watch the programme before ranting I suppose... I'm just sick of these promising documentaries, that turn out to be nothing more than watered down crappy excuses to talk about obesity.
 

Abbeygoo

Distinguished Member
^^^^^

what he said.

Plus a bit more about wearing the right trainers. I know from experience that you can't beat wearing the right equipment when running. Proper fitted running shoes where your feet have been measured and analysed correctly, running socks, base layers etc .... all help and I know it for a fact.

Will be interested but a little cynical at the same time.
 

wookielover

Well-known Member
As above .

Protein shake s and there respective companies make me laugh . They must have the best marketing departments in the world . My favourite has always been "anabolic window " , getting body builders to endorse them ... " yeah chicken and fish oh and this brand of protein 3 times a day " . Load of rubbish. Protein shakes are only good if your works out and only then to get your protein and calorie figures up and only because they are generally cheaper and easier to digest then solid food . All these pele I see buying tubs of USN and other brands for £50 " yeah it's good stuff " I just laugh . I go to myprotein.com and get a load of "purish" protein for a silly cheap price.
Its a subject which really gets my goat .
And isotonic drinks , water , that will rehydrate you . Isotonics good maybe if your usain bolt , that's about it .

Oats
Steak
Chicken
Fish
Veg
Brown rice
Cheap protein shake .

Done
 

DrWise

Banned
protein shake is hyped up to much :)

just have green tea
and up with the eggs, chicken etc
 

Desmo

Distinguished Member
Nothing wrong with protein shakes but people jump at them far too early and easily in my opinion.

As for the programme, I think it will be the usual documentary where they tell you everything whilst telling you nothing. You have to remember these are for the general public and not for anyone who has knowledge on the subject already. I can see myself wanting to put my foot through the TV at times :laugh:
 

Foster

Distinguished Member
Nothing wrong with protein shakes but people jump at them far too early and easily in my opinion.

As for the programme, I think it will be the usual documentary where they tell you everything whilst telling you nothing. You have to remember these are for the general public and not for anyone who has knowledge on the subject already. I can see myself wanting to put my foot through the TV at times :laugh:
I'm going to watch it, I'm sure it will be "interesting"
 

Abbeygoo

Distinguished Member
Nothing wrong with protein shakes but people jump at them far too early and easily in my opinion.

As for the programme, I think it will be the usual documentary where they tell you everything whilst telling you nothing. You have to remember these are for the general public and not for anyone who has knowledge on the subject already. I can see myself wanting to put my foot through the TV at times :laugh:
It will just put people off, in my opinion, rather than encouraging the use of proper sports products in the right situation.

If you are jogging round the block or doing a light training session at the gym - then water is usually sufficient. But in intensive sessions, long runs etc then the sports drinks are definitely more efficient at replacing the fluids lost through sweat.

As ever, programmes like this want to find fault where non exists and provide more excuses for the couch potatoes of Great Britain to wave their fist at their TV in annoyance.

:D
 

Doug the D

Member
Personally, I think lucozade/powerade etc... are a load of old tosh. I'll do a half marathon, and just drink water afterwards. I'm still hydrating myself at the end of the day...
 

GBDG1

Distinguished Member
Personally, I think lucozade/powerade etc... are a load of old tosh. I'll do a half marathon, and just drink water afterwards. I'm still hydrating myself at the end of the day...
There isn't really an argument that these things work - they do. Your body only has a limited supply of glycogen, you need to consume more food to replenish these stores, the fastest way to do this is taking in sugar. In addition, when you sweat you don't only lose water, you lose electrolytes. As you get further into an endurance event (in the grand scheme, a half marathon isn't very long at all) you enter a dangerous cycle where the water you're taking in is flushing electrolytes from the body, and not allowing you to retain the water you're drinking. This also depends on pacing, and whether you're in an Aerobic or Anaerobic state.

The question isn't whether these things work, it's whether they work better than something costing 10x less (if such a thing exists).
 

inzaman

Moderator
Just to also agree with the above two as i use an electrolyte drink whilst cycling and not only drink less whilst exercising than i used to when i just took water, i also find that when i get back from cycling i am not drinking copious amounts of water/pop and therefore not up all night pi**ing.

I have also converted some of the guys i go cycling with and they now use an electrolyte based drink and have found the same or similar results than me :)
 

mjn

Distinguished Member
Already set to record.
 

sniffer66

Distinguished Member
I

What i suspect will happen is some irritating presenter will run for 2 minutes on a tread mill. Then drink a lucozade and not run it any faster. From there they will derive that it doesn't work. Cut to a story about a 25 stone man who drinks 8 litres of lucozade per day, then some stuff about marketing of sports drinks. Next they'll interview the chief executive of Pepsi, who will skillfully avoid all questions. Then some tie in to the Olympics.


I should probably watch the programme before ranting I suppose... I'm just sick of these promising documentaries, that turn out to be nothing more than watered down crappy excuses to talk about obesity.
Good call :smashin:
 

CoolBreeze9

Member
I just hope it's a proper program.
I agree with your sentiments entirely.

The timing of the show is questionable as well now that I come to think of it. With the governments efforts to tax sports nutrition, I guess this would be a perfect time to suggest that they do nothing for the average person.
 

wookielover

Well-known Member
My friend makes his own drink using 50% water 50% orange juice and a pinch of salt. Swears by it
 

IronGiant

Moderator
I agree with your sentiments entirely.

The timing of the show is questionable as well now that I come to think of it. With the governments efforts to tax sports nutrition, I guess this would be a perfect time to suggest that they do nothing for the average person.
I hadn't thought of that, good point. But do remember: if it's a crap program, it's not my fault :D
 

sniffer66

Distinguished Member
wookielover said:
My friend makes his own drink using 50% water 50% orange juice and a pinch of salt. Swears by it
My sons goalkeeping coach ( who played at Chelsea) says all the boys used to do water, Ribena and salt instead of lucozade etc and swears by it
 

silent ninja

Well-known Member
Just to also agree with the above two as i use an electrolyte drink whilst cycling and not only drink less whilst exercising than i used to when i just took water, i also find that when i get back from cycling i am not drinking copious amounts of water/pop and therefore not up all night pi**ing.

I have also converted some of the guys i go cycling with and they now use an electrolyte based drink and have found the same or similar results than me :)
Which one do you use?
 

Doug the D

Member
GBDG1 said:
There isn't really an argument that these things work - they do. Your body only has a limited supply of glycogen, you need to consume more food to replenish these stores, the fastest way to do this is taking in sugar. In addition, when you sweat you don't only lose water, you lose electrolytes. As you get further into an endurance event (in the grand scheme, a half marathon isn't very long at all) you enter a dangerous cycle where the water you're taking in is flushing electrolytes from the body, and not allowing you to retain the water you're drinking. This also depends on pacing, and whether you're in an Aerobic or Anaerobic state.

The question isn't whether these things work, it's whether they work better than something costing 10x less (if such a thing exists).
Ok fair point, but what I meant is that after exercise, would I not be ok drinking water and replacing any lost minerals/ glucose etc with food? I guess what I'm trying to say is that after I have completed a run I don't feel the need to use expensive drinks. I think a half marathon is a respectable enough distance too btw ;)
I do agree though that when I start to run much more distance on any sort of regular basis that I should consider using more than just plain old water. Out of curiosity, what did athletes use before isotonic drinks came along?
 

GBDG1

Distinguished Member
Ok fair point, but what I meant is that after exercise, would I not be ok drinking water and replacing any lost minerals/ glucose etc with food? I guess what I'm trying to say is that after I have completed a run I don't feel the need to use expensive drinks. I think a half marathon is a respectable enough distance too btw ;)
I do agree though that when I start to run much more distance on any sort of regular basis that I should consider using more than just plain old water. Out of curiosity, what did athletes use before isotonic drinks came along?
No idea, but lucozade has been around since 1927!
 

inzaman

Moderator
Which one do you use?
High 5 Zero for training.
For Sportives normally it's one High 5 Zero and a 2:1 or i might go two 2:1 just depending on how hilly and long.
 

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