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BBC News - Young Drivers

kevykat

Distinguished Member
Anyone else watching BBC News this morning?
The related story
BBC - Newsbeat - New call to change 'licence to kill' for young drivers

The unfortunate girl on the couch crashed her car 6 months after she passed her test. Is now in a wheel chair after breaking her spine.
After the accident she admitted she was to blame, she was doing over 70mph on a back road, took a corner too wide and rolled into a field.
But now shes been looking into it further and the usual accountability factor has changed and she blames how lessons and the driving tests are done.
Coming out with things like they don't teach us to drive with blaring music, with a car load of folk etc.

Another cop out by society for a change. Pretty sure she knows it's illegal to go above the speed limit, which she did anyway. If you are not confident with driving at night then common sense kicks in and you take extra care.

Ive been involved in a few accidents and received 2 SP30's in the past. I certainly don't blame anyone else for that. :facepalm:
 
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BAN5HEE

Prominent Member
Most of the proposed changes seem good to me. However I'm afraid that magical thing called common sense seems to have disappeared with the new generation of kids and young people. Sometimes I am amazed how some of them manage to get to 16....


• A minimum learning period before drivers are allowed to take the test

• Allowing learners to take lessons on motorways, in bad weather or at night

• Making the test more difficult

• More incentives for young drivers to take extra training after the test

• Bringing in temporary restrictions on new drivers - including a possible ban on carrying non-family members
 

kevykat

Distinguished Member
Most of the proposed changes seem good to me. However I'm afraid that magical thing called common sense seems to have disappeared with the new generation of kids and young people. Sometimes I am amazed how some of them manage to get to 16....


• A minimum learning period before drivers are allowed to take the test

• Allowing learners to take lessons on motorways, in bad weather or at night

• Making the test more difficult

• More incentives for young drivers to take extra training after the test

• Bringing in temporary restrictions on new drivers - including a possible ban on carrying non-family members

I agree with the changes, but 2 issues. You cant predict what the weather will be like during the lesson and depending on the time of year and hours of darkness being late at night it may also not be practical

one thing i have said for years is a restriction on engine size and BHP of a car. parents i blame in this case often. buying their kids stupid quick cars at 17-18
 

BAN5HEE

Prominent Member
I agree with the changes, but 2 issues. You cant predict what the weather will be like during the lesson and depending on the time of year and hours of darkness being late at night it may also not be practical

one thing i have said for years is a restriction on engine size and BHP of a car. parents i blame in this case often. buying their kids stupid quick cars at 17-18

Good points. I also think there should be a zero tolerance until they are 21 on any speeding so they get double points compared to what a more experienced and older driver might get. This should force them to think twice about speeding if there might be a risk of losing their license after two fines.
 

kevykat

Distinguished Member
Good points. I also think there should be a zero tolerance until they are 21 on any speeding so they get double points compared to what a more experienced and older driver might get. This should force them to think twice about speeding if there might be a risk of losing their license after two fines.

is there still just a 6 point allocation for the first year for new drivers?
every other week there are accidents in aberdeen from drivers of all ages. there has also been a few deaths, young drivers are a regular appearance in our local paper
 

shodan

Distinguished Member
Well the system now gives them points on the licence they haven't got so if they do decide to go legit it will hit them harder..... that'll learn 'em... Or they disqualify them until test passed....

I don't want prison space taken up with people who drive with no licence, (well I do but with the limited cell space with have now, I want more substantial offences to result in custodial sentences instead of them not receiving a custodial sentence due to insufficient cell space), so I say hit them with fines of £5000 to £10,000 and/or stopping any benefit monies. If they repeat the offence or keep getting nicked for non payment of fine then they deserve a custodial sentence and they would have earned it.

The rest of us pay thousands of pounds for the privilege of driving (yes its a privilege, not a right just like having children) so why should they not have to.

I know no system is perfect and my suggestion is flawed too, but I think its better than what is in place.

Oh, and I'm feeling grumpy and as my boss calls me, Draconian today...
 

Daddy k

Distinguished Member
kevykat said:
Anyone else watching BBC News this morning?
The related story
BBC - Newsbeat - New call to change 'licence to kill' for young drivers

The unfortunate girl on the couch crashed her car 6 months after she passed her test. Is now in a wheel chair after breaking her spine.
After the accident she admitted she was to blame, she was doing over 70mph on a back road, took a corner too wide and rolled into a field.
But now shes been looking into it further and the usual accountability factor has changed and she blames how lessons and the driving tests are done.
Coming out with things like they don't teach us to drive with blaring music, with a car load of folk etc.

Another cop out by society for a change. Pretty sure she knows it's illegal to go above the speed limit, which she did anyway. If you are not confident with driving at night then common sense kicks in and you take extra care.

Ive been involved in a few accidents and received 2 SP30's in the past. I certainly don't blame anyone else for that. :facepalm:

Sounds more like her solicitor talking to try and get someone else to be negligent so they can get some money for her driving like a sap and ruining her own life.
 

kevykat

Distinguished Member
Sounds more like her solicitor talking to try and get someone else to be negligent so they can get some money for her driving like a sap and ruining her own life.

It's a common trend these days. People trying to not be held accountable for their own actions
 

Stuart Wright

AVForums Founder
Staff member
I don't think restricting the type of car would make much difference. The insurance is so ridiculous for young people that the vast majority can only afford very cheap cars anyway. And whether it's a Fiesta or a Porche doing 60 on the wrong side of the road, the occupants of the car and the one involved in the head on collision will likely suffer very similar injuries.
My wife's brother's ex-girlfriend's 19 year old grandson and his two friends and, I think, some occupants of the other car died in a head on crash when he was driving too fast to take a corner. And my kids will be learning to drive in the next few years. So this topic resonates somewhat with me.
I think technology could be the answer. For a start, I would like to see some kind of optional device which limits the speed to something like the speed limit + 10%. Also maybe analyse the type of driving by recording the G forces on the vehicle, and if they are indicative of repeated excessive breaking, accelerating and cornering, then bring that to the attention of the driver and the insurance company. Load the insurance according to the driving style, maybe. Just a thought.
 

kevykat

Distinguished Member
I don't think restricting the type of car would make much difference. The insurance is so ridiculous for young people that the vast majority can only afford very cheap cars anyway. And whether it's a Fiesta or a Porche doing 60 on the wrong side of the road, the occupants of the car and the one involved in the head on collision will likely suffer very similar injuries.
My wife's brother's ex-girlfriend's grandson and his two friends and, I think, some occupants of the other car died in a head on crash when he was driving too fast to take a corner. And my kids will be learning to drive in the next few years. So this topic resonates somewhat with me.
I think technology could be the answer. For a start, I would like to see some kind of optional device which limits the speed to something like the limit + 10%. Also maybe analyse the type of driving by recording the G forces on the vehicle, and if they are indicative of repeated excessive breaking, accelerating and cornering, then bring that to the attention of the driver and the insurance company. Load the insurance according to the driving style, maybe. Just a thought.

There is a new thing that has just started Stuart. I will try find more info. It's a dual key car. The parents key is the master key so to say. Parent's can set the max speed limit of the car and max stereo volume etc. The childs key doesn't allow them to access these settings.
Having a stupid quick car is another reason to show off. If the parents bought them this they will no doubt be paying insurance too. Irresponsible parenting.

Edit
Link
http://m.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-21483160

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...-parents-restrict-speed-youngsters-drive.html
 
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ODB_69

Distinguished Member
I thought there was already an optional system that does all that?



TBH rather than just young people being monitored I'd like old people to be monitored as well. I have far more issues with old people driving than young people. I'm sick of getting cut up by some old grandad who doesnt look let alone signal before they pull across me. The old granny who lives across from me drives like a maniac too...like what you'd expect a boy racer to drive at. Generally everyone on our street drives ok (with the exception of the boyf of daughter of the house opposite who seems to think he's on a formula one circuit) buit the old granny drives like a maniac, she flies around the corner onto our street to the point where when she turns shes on the opposite side of the road
 

Stuey1

Prominent Member
I don't think restricting the type of car would make much difference. The insurance is so ridiculous for young people that the vast majority can only afford very cheap cars anyway. And whether it's a Fiesta or a Porche doing 60 on the wrong side of the road, the occupants of the car and the one involved in the head on collision will likely suffer very similar injuries.
My wife's brother's ex-girlfriend's 19 year old grandson and his two friends and, I think, some occupants of the other car died in a head on crash when he was driving too fast to take a corner. And my kids will be learning to drive in the next few years. So this topic resonates somewhat with me.
I think technology could be the answer. For a start, I would like to see some kind of optional device which limits the speed to something like the speed limit + 10%. Also maybe analyse the type of driving by recording the G forces on the vehicle, and if they are indicative of repeated excessive breaking, accelerating and cornering, then bring that to the attention of the driver and the insurance company. Load the insurance according to the driving style, maybe. Just a thought.

I thought that you can get car insurance with a black box that monitors all of this and charges you accordingly?

I like the first idea of the car being automatically limited to the speed limit of the road though, I reckon if that was mandatory that would have a massive impact on safety although it would reduce speeding ticket income
 

RottenFox

Distinguished Member
It's a common trend these days. People trying to not be held accountable for their own actions

Don't see how anyone apart from her could be liable/at fault.
Standard Teenager = bulletproof, until something happens, then it's either someone elses fault, or society who are to blame.

How many people out there have passed their tests, and not been as stupid/unlucky as she was.
Don't see the need to change the test, just for the stupids, unless they give them an advanced driving course, and standard test, and your pass is graded on both.

You wouldn't take a street corner turn, or a roundabout at 70, so what makes them think they can do it on a back road, or do it when they show off to their pals.?
Stereos/Phones/Teenagers/make-up/inability to hold the wheel/Cars/Speed, all mixed together in 1 hefty metal killing machine, don't mix.
 

liamt

Distinguished Member
I don't think restricting the type of car would make much difference. The insurance is so ridiculous for young people that the vast majority can only afford very cheap cars anyway. And whether it's a Fiesta or a Porche doing 60 on the wrong side of the road, the occupants of the car and the one involved in the head on collision will likely suffer very similar injuries.
My wife's brother's ex-girlfriend's 19 year old grandson and his two friends and, I think, some occupants of the other car died in a head on crash when he was driving too fast to take a corner. And my kids will be learning to drive in the next few years. So this topic resonates somewhat with me.
I think technology could be the answer. For a start, I would like to see some kind of optional device which limits the speed to something like the speed limit + 10%. Also maybe analyse the type of driving by recording the G forces on the vehicle, and if they are indicative of repeated excessive breaking, accelerating and cornering, then bring that to the attention of the driver and the insurance company. Load the insurance according to the driving style, maybe. Just a thought.

some insurance companies are now using an app to monitor driving.

basically you have the app on and it monitors your speed and if you keep going over the limits it will drive up your insurance. drive steadily and it reduces.

of course all you need to do is turn it off on the roads you speed on, so its hardly that accurate.

some insurers fit a black box that cannot be tampered with which monitors speed and reflects on your insurance.
 

kav

Distinguished Member
TBH rather than just young people being monitored I'd like old people to be monitored as well. I have far more issues with old people driving than young people. I'm sick of getting cut up by some old grandad who doesnt look let alone signal before they pull across me. The old granny who lives across from me drives like a maniac too...like what you'd expect a boy racer to drive at. Generally everyone on our street drives ok (with the exception of the boyf of daughter of the house opposite who seems to think he's on a formula one circuit) buit the old granny drives like a maniac, she flies around the corner onto our street to the point where when she turns shes on the opposite side of the road

The stats don't really support your argument though.
 

kBm

Distinguished Member
There was some talk a few years ago about using speed restriction via GPS. It know the location, the max speed limit so restricts your speed accordingly. Seems like a good idea.

Of course, it wont stop a young driver hitting the national speed limit on a A Road and having a head on collision, but its a start.
 

liamt

Distinguished Member
The stats don't really support your argument though.

they is a saying that young people have accidents and that old people cause them

i had to tell my dad to stop driving, he just wasnt capable or safe any more due to parkinsons (not too bad and managed for years) but the parkinsons dementia started to set in and he just wasnt safe then.

also, old people tend to drive badly. too slow and make impatient people overtake which causes accidents. doing 30 on a 60 just isnt acceptable and if you arent capable of driving safely at speed you should stop driving (IMO)
 

liamt

Distinguished Member
There was some talk a few years ago about using speed restriction via GPS. It know the location, the max speed limit so restricts your speed accordingly. Seems like a good idea.

Of course, it wont stop a young driver hitting the national speed limit on a A Road and having a head on collision, but its a start.

i have had a few accidents (none for 6 years!:thumbsup:) but all of them were at low speed so that wouldnt do anything to help in those circumstances
 

ODB_69

Distinguished Member
The stats don't really support your argument though.


Stats only show you certain things, usually what you (or in this case the insurance companies) want to see


How many times you seen about some young lad driving the wrong way down the motorway?

How many times you seen about some old bloke driving the wrong way down the motorway?
 

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