BBC Launches Public Consultation to Help Shape iPlayer Future

Discussion in 'Film & TV On Demand Streaming Services' started by Phil Hinton, Jan 16, 2019.


    1. Andy Bassett

      Andy Bassett
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    2. rhino2k

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      This may actually make the tv license worth the cost. Currently my partner watches 2 programs with limited airtime and that’s it.

      So for around 30 episodes of tv a year the £15 odd a month it costs seems a lot.
       
    3. Over by there

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      They should have had this nailed a few years ago. The other channels they mention only seem to bring a lot of tat to the TV and all through an ad service that must be watched.

      The archives are a goldmine and flogging off a few rights here and there overseas is a pain. IPTV them on a rotating basis and get going with 4k. Stop dallying around with tests, as good as they are.

      Mucho reading in the linked link. Off for a shufty.
       
    4. kahlua

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      long overdue,iplayer is a great service but needs updating to compete,stop testing hlg and start using it.
       
    5. Otto Chriek

      Otto Chriek
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      I think people need to treat this development with caution.

      The licence fee is currently levied on the use of television receiving equipment, the BBC is trapped in the world of broadcasting which it knows has little future in the long term.

      I believe that to secure it's income in the future the BBC will try to break out of these current restrictions and will seek to extend the concept of the licence fee beyond broadcasting as we know it. It will try to convince politicians to extend the licence to those people who only watch programming via internet streaming services, attempting to justify this change by claiming that it needs to be able to compete with those services.

      Faced with the ever changing world of the media The BBC will attempt to protect it's privileged funding model rather than find creative way to adapt to the new reality.
       
    6. Over by there

      Over by there
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      The charter puts them in an awkward position when they have to compete with other firms. Netflix does not have to provide local news and radio and get feeds to aerial transmitters.

      The charter does expect them to embrace new technologies I think, well, investigate and use if applicable I suppose. The HLG tests that I have seen (converted to HDR) are stunning. I expect that over the years the iPlayer department was where managers went before retirement, feels that way to me and probably unfair.
       
    7. dante01

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      Looks as though the BBC are doing what they did with HD with their iPlayer service? They started out as being inovative by introducing HD TV to the UK, but then fell behind everyone else and ran out of funding. The BBC still haven't finished rolling out HD to every local region yet and says that diminished funding has made this difficult to achieve, yet the BBC still diverts funds towards HLG and 4K rather than finishing what they started.

      The BBC are now looking at aspects of their iPlayer service that are actually ancillary to more mainstream issues with it. The iPlayer cannot even convey 5.1 audio and the reason you don't get it is because the entire iPlayer platform has no ability to facilitate it, yet the BBC are still pouring money into UHD, HLG and other ancillary projects. How about they fix or address legacy issues they've as yet not fixed rather than adding more stuff to their already under funded agenda?

      The things they are now looking at should only be addressed once the actual iPlayer platform is comparable in technical abilities to other services such as Netflix or Amazon Video.
       
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      Last edited: Jan 17, 2019
    8. zubeir

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      I completed the public consultation questions last week. Hopefully it will help bolster the content access for a longer term for viewers.
       
    9. Chinstroke

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      I had a look at the document and it shows that they are still completely out of touch with reality. If they want to make iplayer relevant for a modern generation then they need to launch it as a subscription service so that non licence payers can pay a monthly subscription to get access.

      This will help them claw back some of the lost revenue from people like me who ditched the licence to become a streaming only household (though not iplayer obviously). For that though I would expect HD with 5.1 as a bare minimum, perhaps with a £2.00 a month premium for UHD. A realistic price would be £7.99 a month for HD and £9.99 for UHD with access to a large back catalogue along with current programming.
       
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    10. dante01

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      I don't even think that the BBC realise that most people use iPlayer as a catch up service for content they've inadvertently missed as opposed to being a video on demand service such as that provided by Netflix or Amazon. Even then, I'm more likely to record content I know I will not be free to view. The simple reasoning being that iPlayer uses inferior audio and video (apart from the UHD content) compared to the BBC's own HD TV broadcasts. The only time you get better video is in relation to the UHD content that has been recently hosted via iPlayer, but even this is marred by the fact that the HD TV broadcasts had superior audio. Dynasties for example was broadcast with an excellent Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack on BBC1, but was only made available with a 2 channel stereo soundtrack via iPlayer when hosted as UHD HLG encoded video. Bizarely the Blu-ray release came with Atmos while the UHD release only had 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio despite Atmos being printed on the packaging???
       
      Last edited: Jan 17, 2019
    11. Kamakazie

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      Broadly agree with the above, fee payers should have 3 options for subscription.
      Broadcast only
      Streaming only
      Both

      Login to iPlayer should be linked to your license number fully.
      The changes to programming suggested are a step in the right direction but the lack of 5.1 noted above needs fixing.
      For big events like the Olympics, the best BBC implementation was unparalleled. Even now the setup for London 2012 hasn't been surpassed so they clearly have the development chops.
       
    12. JabbaNut

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      The TV licence is being stretched to far. For streaming on demand iPlayer should be subscription or advert funded. As it is, its just back splappers, free lunch, service for lovies. BBC needs to be made to commercially compete, in the real world.
       
    13. Soundizer

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      Totally agree. They prance around with occasional HDR HLG, but rest of content looks awful. Especially dark scenes. Compressed.

      Yet they keep promoting iPlayer. Very low standards.
       
    14. James C

      James C
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      If their approach is to ensure as many people as possible have access to their services, why don't they use HDR10 with their iPlayer service instead of investing in HLG? Can't understand the push for HLG as value for money when far more people have access to HDR10.
       
    15. AVRAG

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      It's got to go. Compulsory payment for a service most don't use is medieval and borderline makes me feel like we live in a Soviet Union... BBC should become ad funded or a subscription service. You need a subscription and log in to use any of it's content.
       
    16. gagaga

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      ^ This.

      Their presumtion is they have a right to exist and forcibly take money from people who choose not to use the BBC, but want to watch other (commercial) services.

      The fee needs to go, and soon. 'Essential' services (local news, Radio 3/4 etc) that are shown not to be provided elsewhere commercially can be centrally funded for a fraction of the BBC's £4.5bn a year. BBC1/BBC3/Radio1,2 etc have alternatives available commerically.

      Alternative is dissolution - the BBC can sell off their assets (Buildings, Top Gear, Doctor Who, Strictly etc) to the highest bidders on dissolution. This can then establish a wealth fund the proceeds of which would fund the true public services.
       
    17. crashcris

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      Crikey! People don't half love to bash the BBC. At present, I believe, the iPlayer is the best service out there. It knocks the spots off the ITV hub and All4 services, certainly in terms of picture quality, surprisingly, MY5 is along with iPlayer in that it also plays HD content, albeit, 720 also. During the UHD trials the BBC stated that they are working on bringing 5.1 sound, so that will happen in the future. NowTV is also still stuck in SD mode or 720 for their movies. Netflix and Amazon Prime cost a fortune and their content is really mostly rubbish.

      If the BBC were to release all their archive of music programmes (in concert/Glastonbur/Reading festivals/The Proms/Old grey whistle test/ etc) I'd be in heaven. Not to mention all their top notch dramas, comedies, nature progs, science progs, films, etc.

      This is a good thing that they're having this consultation. I'm very much looking forward to The iPlayer getting even better very shortly. Viva la Beeb!
       
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    18. Chinstroke

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      I'm sorry I have to disagree with this point. Netflix costs me £7.99 a month and for that I get HD and 5.1 Sound, recent films along with back catalogue material. Some very good original content as well as far more TV and films than I would ever have time to watch. BBC on the other hand costs £12.50 a month and their online streaming service does not provide 5.1 sound and only allows you to watch a program 30 days after it airs. I have no interest in watching linear TV so on that basis which one costs a fortune compared to the other.
       
    19. dante01

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      Well for rubbish srvices they appear to be doing rather well and the BBC see them as being their main competitor. The following is from the BBC's own documentation relating to the BBC's proposals for the iPlayer service:

      snapshot001.jpg

      snapshot002.jpg
      http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthe...iplayer_public_interest_test_consultation.pdf


      As to cost, 12 months access to Netflix would cost you as little as £71.88 for their basic service or no more than £119.98 for their Premium plan. The BBC's license fee is currently £150.50 for a colour license.
       
    20. Over by there

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      iPlayer seems to have been left behind and I suspect it was a management thing not keeping their eye on the ball but they do have a wide remit to uphold and in a way I can appreciate that but I think they should have been further ahead with it than they are now.

      That is the main criticism for me, apparent losing sight of what will likely compete with the aerial feeds at some point, charter and OFCOM allowing. They can do more with this. I like it and use it. But by eckythump it can be better.

      Other than that, happy. I can live without the others including UK broadcasters and the main streamers but I use a lot of BBC services.
       
    21. dante01

      dante01
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      The obvious issue with the BBC and its analysis is that the BBC actually thinks that iPlayer is a VOD service when it is no more than a catch up service. iPLayer can only really be regarded as being either a catch up service or an online TV channel (if also taking BBC3 into consideration). BBC3 is something I did used to occasionally watch when it was a conventional channel, but simply do not now bother with since the BBC moved its content online. THe funny thing about this is that I do actually watch some older BBC content, but via Netflix because the BBC don't make it available via their own iPlayer platform.

      The BBC can't effectively host many of its more popular shows on iPlayer as box sets because the likes of Netflix would then be less inclined to pay the BBC for the rights to host such content. The BBC would need to start charging for access to iPlayer in order to avoid losing revenue currently coming to them via Netflix because Netflix are not going to pay as much as they currently pay if such content can be accessed for free in the UK.
       
    22. Over by there

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      I thought that BBC were stopped from offering a lot of its content?

      Revenue is certainly something for the Beeb, Top Gear was a big brand and Blue Planet etc. Would the charging be an issue for the UK?
       
    23. dante01

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      They can make a profit from it if they go via BBC Worldwide. It's basically the division of the BBC that is responsible tor releasing content on disc and selling stuff abroad.
       
    24. atmoscinema

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      I'd like it better if there was no DOG, or a smaller one, like BBC Four.
       

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