BBC inundated with complaints about coverage of Prince Philip's death.

Tight Git

Distinguished Member
Do you happen to know why the lead bugler sounding the Last Post kept turning his head about 1/8th of a turn on every phrase? I thought initially it was a signal to the other 3 to end the phrase, but when they played a second bugle call he didn't do it.

I was wondering this too.

I've tried Google, but it's difficult to phrase the question.

Do we have any budding buglers out there who can enlighten us, please?

There's nobody in our family that I can ask, although my brother-in-law does like to blow his own trumpet! :D
 

An Thropologist

Well-known Member
I was wondering this too.

I've tried Google, but it's difficult to phrase the question.

Do we have any budding buglers out there who can enlighten us, please?

There's nobody in our family that I can ask, although my brother-in-law does like to blow his own trumpet! :D
Yes I tried a Google search too. I am wondering if it produces an acoustic effect - something to do with sustaining or fading the note maybe? I know a number of musicians but none of them blowers.
 

phil t

Well-known Member
Do you happen to know why the lead bugler sounding the Last Post kept turning his head about 1/8th of a turn on every phrase? I thought initially it was a signal to the other 3 to end the phrase, but when they played a second bugle call he didn't do it.

I was wondering this too.

I've tried Google, but it's difficult to phrase the question.

Do we have any budding buglers out there who can enlighten us, please?

There's nobody in our family that I can ask, although my brother-in-law does like to blow his own trumpet! :D
I don't know the definitive answer, but here's my take.

The note values at the end of the phrases of the last post are tied note of 3 beats with a pause, hence needing the timing.

The note values in the call to action stations (think that was what it was) are singular beat only, so don't need timing in the same way.

The glib answer is I was Submarines, not Royal Marines. Soz. Couldn't resist that one.
 

87gpk

Well-known Member
Some of the posts in this thread detailing the more intricate perhaps details of parts of the funeral have opened my eyes to how much goes into it.
 

phil t

Well-known Member
Some of the posts in this thread detailing the more intricate perhaps details of parts of the funeral have opened my eyes to how much goes into it.
The piping the side may have more meaning than first meets the eye.

Officers of suitable seniority are piped as the pass across the gangway from shoreside to ship/submarine.

When a serviceman from the Royal Navy passes, they are said to be on eternal patrol.

On this occasion, it represents the passing from this life to the next as they join the ship that they'll do their eternal patrol on.
 

An Thropologist

Well-known Member
I don't know the definitive answer, but here's my take.

The note values at the end of the phrases of the last post are tied note of 3 beats with a pause, hence needing the timing.

The note values in the call to action stations (think that was what it was) are singular beat only, so don't need timing in the same way.

The glib answer is I was Submarines, not Royal Marines. Soz. Couldn't resist that one.
Thank you. It could be timing of course but that doesn't sit entirely well with me. I think even from the number of times I have been exposed to the Last Post - which is Rememberance Sunday and on TV and film it would be enough to instinctively know how long to sustain the note. I would think for military buglers who must hear it every day the length of the notes would get into their bones and they would stop blowing at the right time based on that mental template. But who knows maybe it is. Thank you for answering though. :)
 

An Thropologist

Well-known Member
The piping the side may have more meaning than first meets the eye.

Officers of suitable seniority are piped as the pass across the gangway from shoreside to ship/submarine.

When a serviceman from the Royal Navy passes, they are said to be on eternal patrol.

On this occasion, it represents the passing from this life to the next as they join the ship that they'll do their eternal patrol on.
Ahh now that is interesting Thank you
 

87gpk

Well-known Member
The piping the side may have more meaning than first meets the eye.

Officers of suitable seniority are piped as the pass across the gangway from shoreside to ship/submarine.

When a serviceman from the Royal Navy passes, they are said to be on eternal patrol.

On this occasion, it represents the passing from this life to the next as they join the ship that they'll do their eternal patrol on.
Thanks. The traditions of funerals are that much more poignant and sad :(
 

An Thropologist

Well-known Member
Some of the posts in this thread detailing the more intricate perhaps details of parts of the funeral have opened my eyes to how much goes into it.
Did you notice when the coffin came up the steps and then stopped for the minute of silence how perfectly spaced everyone was? It wasn't a case of everyone just stopping to reflect and standing higgledy piggledy. Each member of the Royal family and the military personnel clearly had a precise mark to stand on (even if not a physical mark) so as to form a perfect pattern on the ground. I suspect this rather than any fear of fisti-cuffs was what informed the processional positions of William, Harry and Peter.
 

Reese Withouterspoon

Distinguished Member
Did you notice when the coffin came up the steps and then stopped for the minute of silence how perfectly [paced everyone was. It wasn't a case of everyone just stopping to reflect and standing higgledy piggledy. Each member of the Royal family and the military personnel clearly had a precise mark to stand on (even if not a physical mark) so as to form a perfect pattern on the ground. I suspect this rather than any fear of fisti-cuffs was what informed the processional positions of William, Harry and Peter.
Ah but that wouldn't fit with the unedifying scenario cooked up in the feverish minds of the hacks in the UK gutter press, would it.

It has also been conveniently forgotten about that William and Harry did not walk side by side behind their mother's coffin either. They were separated by Earl Spencer.

Are we to presume that he was there to stop them kicking the living daylights out of each other on that day?
 

87gpk

Well-known Member
Did you notice when the coffin came up the steps and then stopped for the minute of silence how perfectly spaced everyone was? It wasn't a case of everyone just stopping to reflect and standing higgledy piggledy. Each member of the Royal family and the military personnel clearly had a precise mark to stand on (even if not a physical mark) so as to form a perfect pattern on the ground. I suspect this rather than any fear of fisti-cuffs was what informed the processional positions of William, Harry and Peter.
I must admit I didn't watch most of it but I did see this and did notice it. Also when they went inside and it was a uniformed masks on quickly which was good to see.
 

Doug the D

Distinguished Member
Did you notice when the coffin came up the steps and then stopped for the minute of silence how perfectly spaced everyone was? It wasn't a case of everyone just stopping to reflect and standing higgledy piggledy. Each member of the Royal family and the military personnel clearly had a precise mark to stand on (even if not a physical mark) so as to form a perfect pattern on the ground. I suspect this rather than any fear of fisti-cuffs was what informed the processional positions of William, Harry and Peter.

For something like a funeral, which whilst planned meticulously, probably never had every single attendee available for multiple rehearsals, it's likely that the floor would have had some form of mark for each person to stand on. This may have been a small shiny plate nailed to the ground, which whilst not visible from distance would have been obvious to those standing close by.

I've seen similar whilst in the military on parade grounds when practising various drills.
 

A1944

Active Member
I noticed that the pall bearers on the left were in opposite step to those on the right, keeping the coffin level.
 

BobBob21

Well-known Member
I heard it fully explained on the BBC at least once (hence knowing what to google) but this might be helpful
Thanks, I did google it at the time. I just think there was more of the pageantry of the ceremony that could have been explained rather than having "experts" being asked how a recent widow feels just before their husband's funeral
 

Plumsandpearls

Well-known Member
People on here have already said it shouldn't have been televised and so undoubtably others will have said the same thing via the BBC complaint form.
It wasn't on bbc1&2 at the same time - which from reading this thread seemed to be a lot of people's issue with last Friday.
 

BobBob21

Well-known Member
It wasn't on bbc1&2 at the same time - which from reading this thread seemed to be a lot of people's issue with last Friday.
And they didn't turn off BBC4... the breaking news coverage was ridiculous and born out by TV viewing being down 60% (and given how its measured I suspect the real drop was higher if you factored in viewing time).

Whilst there won't be complaints about the funeral dominating all channels all day there will still be some complaints... as already mentioned in the quoted post.
 

krish

Distinguished Member
I don't think cameras should have been used in the service itself. Let the family pay their last respects in private. It's an intensely emotional moment and nobody needs to intrude on that. I felt for them, especially the Queen all on her own. Should have been audio only for the service.
It was the family's wishes and I presume the late Duke's too. He had arranged for veteran royal photographer Arthur Edwards to hide inside a fake pillar to take intimate photographs.
 

Plumsandpearls

Well-known Member
It was the family's wishes and I presume the late Duke's too. He had arranged for veteran royal photographer Arthur Edwards to hide inside a fake pillar to take intimate photographs.
I was reading "take a break" magazine and this pic was in a story.
We are all different, but I can't comprehend why anyone would want pics at a funeral (and fair enough Philip did).
I've been at a funeral where people checked themselves In on fb.
1618744962083685555854963274603.jpg
 

BobBob21

Well-known Member
You can't please all of the people all of the time etc...
Which is often proven by the fact the same coverage will get complaints saying it was too long, other complaints saying it was too short and also compliments that it was the perfect length.
 

Xenomorph

Well-known Member
It was the family's wishes and I presume the late Duke's too. He had arranged for veteran royal photographer Arthur Edwards to hide inside a fake pillar to take intimate photographs.

Fair enough then, if that's what they wanted.
 

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