BBC bias...

Cliff

Distinguished Member
John Humphrys has just retired and is now free to talk about the overwhelming anti Brexit and liberal bias the BBC has. He also mentions the pompous Eddie Mair!
Looks to be quite a good read.

His memoir also reveals that:
  • BBC bosses wallowed in despair when Britain voted Leave in the referendum;
  • Its staff increasingly ‘confuse their own interests with those of the wider world’;
  • ‘Barmy’ jargon-spouting managers behaved like 1950s Kremlin commissars;
  • The BBC is in hock to ‘the politically correct brigade and the most fashionable pressure groups’.
But recalling the morning after the 2016 referendum, he says: ‘Leave had won – and this was not what the BBC had expected. Nor what it wanted.
‘No nods and smiles when the big bosses appeared. No attempt to pretend that this was anything other than a disaster.
‘Their expressions were as grim as the look on the face of a football supporter when his team’s star player misses the penalty that would have won them the cup. Bosses, almost to a man and woman, could simply not grasp how anyone could have put a cross in the Leave box on the referendum ballot paper.
‘I’m not sure the BBC as a whole ever quite had a real grasp of what was going on in Europe, or of what people in this country thought about it.’

 
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IronGiant

Moderator
Does that formatting work? :):devil:
 

Panavision

Active Member
Tony Livsey on 5live Drive has been more balanced about Brexit, but many in the BBC are very bias on many subjects, not just Brexit.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
We should be discussing their alleged bias on Brexit in this thread :)
 

HSC

Active Member
everyone has an opinion on the beeb though...
I've always felt the BBC to be too pro Brexit and with a few exceptions have failed to challenge falsehoods effectively and given voice to too many idiots
 

IronGiant

Moderator
everyone has an opinion on the beeb though...
I've always felt the BBC to be too pro Brexit...
Must be a different BBC to the one we are discussing :)
 

Cliff

Distinguished Member
Most of the middle classes wallowed in despair when Britain voted leave...we all had the sense to release what a mess was about to descend on the country.
I wouldn’t say so based on my friends. Are you falling into the trap of looking at those who voted for Brexit as uneducated and not middle class? There are lots of middle class ‘educated’ people who are not part of the urban elite, and solid Brexiteers. It was pretty clear to me that extracting ourselves wasn’t going to be an easy task. In fact I made the comment pre referendum, that I wouldn’t envy Cameron’s job if we voted to leave. As it was, he quit! So most educated people knew it was going to be a difficult task, but sometimes the extra work is worth it!

Anyway, John Humphrys take on this...
That there is a form of institutional liberal bias, however, I have no doubt. And a big factor — perhaps the biggest — is the Corporation’s recruitment process. As a potential employer, the BBC can pick and choose between the cream of the arts graduates from the top universities — a disproportionately large proportion of whom had been to private schools.
And it’s a racing certainty that there won’t be more than a handful of Tories among them — if only because most will have spent three years being taught by academics on the political Left. (Eight out of ten academics in the leading universities are Left-wing, according to a 2017 survey.)....
There is, I believe, a groupthink mentality, an implicit BBC attitude to what makes news. Decisions are influenced, if only subconsciously, by what the organisation has done in the past. So it can too often be willing to settle for the status quo, settling into the same lines of thought.
This may explain why the BBC sometimes fails so badly to spot a change in the nation’s mood — in hugely important areas. Immigration was one of them.
 

Dbcoup

Distinguished Member
Most of the middle classes wallowed in despair when Britain voted leave...we all had the sense to release what a mess was about to descend on the country.
So your a middle class and wallowing in despair? You have no idea how much that has spurred me on.
 

Rasczak

Distinguished Member
So your a middle class and wallowing in despair? You have no idea how much that has spurred me on.
Understanding the difference between present and past tense is key in this scenario. "Wallowed".
 
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deantown

Distinguished Member
Everyone I know voted to leave, and I would say they are all middle class. So not sure where you get your facts from.
 

Bl4ckGryph0n

Distinguished Member
I find it really sad when something like that happens and that is how an institution that is supposed to be partial reacts. I've found them always a bit part of the champagne socialist crowd as well. Anyway, a shame when so-called professionals can't do their own job properly. It should be journalistically a super exciting time with so many possible stories and angles, and no need to put their own bias in it.
 

Bl4ckGryph0n

Distinguished Member
Most of the middle classes wallowed in despair when Britain voted leave...we all had the sense to release what a mess was about to descend on the country.
I love it how some people still like to put everyone in their little boxes and class system. Yeah yeah, whether did or do because of your 'ed' doesn't matter, you bring the point up.
 

Rasczak

Distinguished Member
I love it how some people still like to put everyone in their little boxes and class system. Yeah yeah, whether did or do because of your 'ed' doesn't matter, you bring the point up.
I think past and present tense is very important. I think many of us saw the result of the 2016 referendum and thought that it was going to cause years and years of pain for our country. And bingo, look where we are. :thumbsdow But, having accepted the result, from the immediate aftermath of the vote onwards I think you will find most remainers have sought to drive forward to improve our lot. Refinement of the constitution, defeat of populism and defence of liberalism are our short term aims. Restoration of our political place in the EU and repairing our depleted international status is our ultimate headmark.
 

Bl4ckGryph0n

Distinguished Member
I think past and present tense is very important. I think many of us saw the result of the 2016 referendum and thought that it was going to cause years and years of pain for our country. And bingo, look where we are. :thumbsdow But, having accepted the result, from the immediate aftermath of the vote onwards I think you will find most remainers have sought to drive forward to improve our lot. Refinement of the constitution, defeat of populism and defence of liberalism are our short term aims. Restoration of our political place in the EU and repairing our depleted international status is our ultimate headmark.
Look where we are, none of the predictions came true ;) Not sure what the future has to do with your continual obsession regarding tense and placing people in their little boxes...
 

Dbcoup

Distinguished Member
from the immediate aftermath of the vote onwards I think you will find most remainers have sought to drive forward to improve our lot.
By trying to reverse the referendum result. Dont worry we all know that already. And maybe you need to look again, because from where im sitting, the wallowing hasn't stopped.
 

Rasczak

Distinguished Member
Look where we are, none of the predictions came true ;)
...because those in charge - who are generally dismissed as 'remainers' - rose to the challenge and took action to protect the economy. The consequence of course has manifested itself in other ways, most notably the perceived 'Brexit betrayal'. Dbcoup's timely intervention immediately above is a perfect and very timely example!
 

Dbcoup

Distinguished Member
Dbcoup's timely intervention immediately above is a perfect and very timely example!
There is a section of society that thinks it is above the rest, knows better and likes everything just as it is, because they benefit nicely.
You can dress it up anyway you want. I dont expect you to agree.
 

Doghouse Riley

Active Member
The BBC has a pro EU bias. It's financially in their interests.
It's sad that the "red button" news facility is going. It's the only news bulletin of the BBC I ever watch. Only because it's very hard for the BBC to get their usual bias into so few words.
 

Rasczak

Distinguished Member
There is a section of society that thinks it is above the rest, knows better and likes everything just as it is, because they benefit nicely.
You can dress it up anyway you want. I dont expect you to agree.
Let's take each of those points in turn:

"There is a section of society that thinks it is above the rest". Yes, of course there is - that is the same in every society. Whether it is money, landholding, asset control, political power or any mix of the same, there will be people who are above the rest.

"knows better". Whether we like it or not, there are people who "know better" on many aspects of Brexit. The EU is so popular amongst "the establishment" for a very good reason, because those who have lived and breathed high level politics knows that, despite all its many faults, the membership of the EU makes overwhelming sense.

"likes everything just as it is". Human society is, by definition, relatively conservative and averse to change. if anything, I think the EU has been too progressive, too rapid in its change. How many times have we heard on here "I had no problem when it was just a trading bloc". Notwithstanding the fact it never was 'just that', it is an example of the organisation evolving and changing too quickly for people to handle.
 

Doghouse Riley

Active Member
Let's take each of those points in turn:

"There is a section of society that thinks it is above the rest". Yes, of course there is - that is the same in every society. Whether it is money, landholding, asset control, political power or any mix of the same, there will be people who are above the rest.

"knows better". Whether we like it or not, there are people who "know better" on many aspects of Brexit. The EU is so popular amongst "the establishment" for a very good reason, because those who have lived and breathed high level politics knows that, despite all its many faults, the membership of the EU makes overwhelming sense.

"likes everything just as it is". Human society is, by definition, relatively conservative and averse to change. if anything, I think the EU has been too progressive, too rapid in its change. How many times have we heard on here "I had no problem when it was just a trading bloc". Notwithstanding the fact it never was 'just that', it is an example of the organisation evolving and changing too quickly for people to handle.
The EU makes overwhelming sense?

The city of Strasbourg (France) is the official seat of the European Parliament. The institution is legally bound[clarify] to meet there twelve sessions a year lasting about four days each. Other work takes place in Brussels and Luxembourg City (see Location of European Union institutions for more information).[4][5] Also all votes of the European Parliament must take place in Strasbourg. "Additional" sessions and committees take place in Brussels. Although de facto a majority of the Parliament's work is now geared to its Brussels site, it is legally bound to keep Strasbourg as its official home.

Legally bound?

Change the law and save a fortune.
 

Dbcoup

Distinguished Member
Let's take each of those points in turn:

"There is a section of society that thinks it is above the rest". Yes, of course there is - that is the same in every society. Whether it is money, landholding, asset control, political power or any mix of the same, there will be people who are above the rest.

"knows better". Whether we like it or not, there are people who "know better" on many aspects of Brexit. The EU is so popular amongst "the establishment" for a very good reason, because those who have lived and breathed high level politics knows that, despite all its many faults, the membership of the EU makes overwhelming sense.

"likes everything just as it is". Human society is, by definition, relatively conservative and averse to change. if anything, I think the EU has been too progressive, too rapid in its change. How many times have we heard on here "I had no problem when it was just a trading bloc". Notwithstanding the fact it never was 'just that', it is an example of the organisation evolving and changing too quickly for people to handle.
Thank you for confirming, you too, are just as out of touch as the people you defend.

There are jobs and positions that will only ever be filled by a select few. Influential people that have paid a lot of money to educate their children, will always get preference, and I'm not sure why you ignore this.
I watch on a daily basis that these alleged "people that know better", make basic errors of judgement, that affect peoples lives on a daily basis, to their detriment. So its obvious the majority are not in these positions by merit, but by privilege.


"I had no problem when it was just a trading bloc". Notwithstanding the fact it never was 'just that',
That is an interesting point, and maybe one that should be looked at, because it could be argued the public were duped back then. If people didnt know what it was they were voting for, surely that too is null and void?
 

Squiffy

Distinguished Member
...because those in charge - who are generally dismissed as 'remainers' - rose to the challenge and took action to protect the economy. The consequence of course has manifested itself in other ways, most notably the perceived 'Brexit betrayal'. Dbcoup's timely intervention immediately above is a perfect and very timely example!
This nonsense again.

Nope. Their forecasts of Doom were exaggerated for political effect. With the treasury being the worst after deliberately excluding actions that they knew the BoE would take from the impacts.

The BoE chief economist did a mea culpa admitting their forecasts were woefully wrong.

So the big question is, what mitigating actions are going to make the current forecasts of Doom wrong?
 

Rasczak

Distinguished Member
There are jobs and positions that will only ever be filled by a select few. Influential people that have paid a lot of money to educate their children, will always get preference, and I'm not sure why you ignore this.
I am not ignoring it - I am agreeing with you that it exists. However, I am also pointing out such distinctions exist in every single society in one form or another.

it could be argued the public were duped back then. If people didnt know what it was they were voting for, surely that too is null and void?
The very first treaty we signed included the phrase "ever closer Union". It was there for all to see.
 

raduv1

Distinguished Member
Most of the middle classes wallowed in despair when Britain voted leave...we all had the sense to release what a mess was about to descend on the country.
This reads like a very condescending reply with looking down ones noes at a class below your own. May of read it wrong but this is how it comes across.
 

Rasczak

Distinguished Member
This reads like a very condescending reply with looking down ones noes at a class below your own. May of read it wrong but this is how it comes across.
Condescending or not, it I don't think anyone can genuinely say Brexit has been an overwhelming success to date.
 

Squiffy

Distinguished Member
The very first treaty we signed included the phrase "ever closer Union". It was there for all to see.
Which Ted Heath blatantly lied about.

This is an interesting article giving the context.


And then we have things he said himself.

There are some in this country who fear that in going into Europe we shall in some way sacrifice independence and sovereignty, even that we shall begin to lose our national identity. These fears, I need hardly say, are completely unjustified and exaggerated.

And much of what he said back then it's very illuminating for those who think leaving the EU is a right wing enterprise.

  • [If Britain withdrew from the EEC] it would be a new and different D-Day for Britain—Disaster Day. Of course, this is what the wild men of the left, Mr Benn, Mr Shore and Mr Foot actually want. They thrive on a diet of disaster...they are aching for the go-ahead to build an economic Berlin wall around Britain. And within that British Berlin wall, there would be a socialist State running a siege economy.
    • Speech in Newcastle (2 May 1975), quoted in The Times (3 May 1975), p. 4
  • We would find ourselves pulling out of the European Community straight into the arms of the wild men of the left. The whole country would be plagued with Foot and Benn disease. ... The left are not really all that interested in the Common Market. What they want is for Britain to break her treaty obligations and pull out of the Community so that they could impose their own extreme socialist state in Britain.
    • Speech in Catterick, Yorkshire (29 May 1975), quoted in The Times (30 May 1975), p. 4
 

Dbcoup

Distinguished Member
Condescending or not, it I don't think anyone can genuinely say Brexit has been an overwhelming success to date.
Because of anti democratic attitudes that your happy to run with.
 

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