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Basic freeview arial/reception questions!

Discussion in 'Freeview & YouView' started by Shedhead, Apr 23, 2005.

  1. Shedhead

    Shedhead
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    Hi all

    I recently borrowed an old On-digital box to see if I could get freeview channels (which I believe I should be able to). However I had no luck in getting any reception.

    I live in area which has good freeview reception according to the website, so I think it could be to do with my arial which is failry old and situated inside the loft (bad news!?!).

    My questions are:

    1. Is there any booster or signal improving-type-device I could buy to get a picture (I'm not keen on having my arial moved outside and would not have the first idea of how to do it in any case)??
    2. Would a different more powerful freeview box give me reception with my current arial set up??

    Many thanks!
     
  2. Starburst

    Starburst
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    Older aerials are simply not designed to receive the digital muxes, a loft aerial will also have problems if there is any reduction is signal strength due to local obstructions etc.
    What works for analogue alas will not always perform well for digital.
    I take it the old Ondigital box worked for whoever gave it to you?
    :)

    I'm no expert on DTT but I would have thought if you are getting zero results a booster isn't going to help much nor would a DTT box with a more sensitive tuner.
    Contact a local aerial installer, they may be able to recommend a suitable indoor aerial or barring that a rooftop one either way it will future proof your DTT reception and is money well spent.
     
  3. deltafx

    deltafx
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    or fit a new aerial yourself just brought a new one myself from argos page 346 no1
    £39.75 .52 element high gain.I live in area which has poor freeview reception
    works great picture is very good mounted on side of house.no amplifer needed
    installer wanted £160/£180.
     
  4. richardys

    richardys
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    The Triax Unix 52 is a good high gain aerial only £31.98 including delivery.
     
  5. Bernard Barnett

    Bernard Barnett
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    Some good advice in this thread but the line quoted above is slightly misleading. There is no such thing as a digital aerial (you should run a mile from anyone who tries to sell you one) and any decent-sized exterior aerial, even an old one, should be able to pick up the Freeview muxes in a good reception area. However, your loft aerial is unlikely to be big/efficient enough and, as has been said, roof mounting is infinitely preferable.
     
  6. Starburst

    Starburst
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    Good point.
    However since I swapped an aerial that picked up all the analogue signals in excellent quality but only the mux that carried the BBC signals with a wideband aerial which then allowed me to pick up everything.
    Calling it a digital aerial is perhaps misleading but does point out that older aerials (decades old) were not designed to pick up everything that is being broadcast today.

    Similar thing I suppose to calling a LNB suitable for digital satellite a "digital LNB" when infact it would be classed as a universal LNB.
     
  7. Shedhead

    Shedhead
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    Many thanks indeed for the replies and advice - reckon I will take the plunge and attempt to install a new arial myself. I let you know how I get on!
     
  8. vex

    vex
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    Traditional Analogue aerials were 'grouped' into bands of frequencies to stop interferance from adjacent transmitters.

    With the advent of DTT, there is a need for more bandwidth while we are transmitting both analogue and dtt so sometime we need to move out of the original band or 'grouping' Hence the need for wideband aerials which are often reffered to as digital aerials.

    I agree there are no differences, nowever the CAI do bench mark antennas and set them into the different performance ratings www.cai.org.uk
     

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