Basic connection advice needed

S

Silver

Guest
Hi Everyone,
I've been researching options in order to buy aged parent a new digital tv setup. I've decided provisionally on a

Humax Freeview PVR-9150T 160GB Twin Tuner PVR
and
Panasonic TX-L32C3B 32 inch TV

Having looked at the online manual for the Panasonic TX-L32C3B, I see that it only has one scart socket. I will want to connect a DVD player to the TV as well as the hard drive recorder.

"Composite Video Input AV2: RCA phono type x 1 (rear)
Component Video Input RCA phono type x 1 set (rear)
Audio Input (HDMI, PC, Composite, Component) RCA phono type x 1 set (rear)
21-Pin Input/Output AV1: AV In/Out, RGB In, Q-Link (rear)"

It seems from the manual I should connect the hard drive recorder to the TV with a scart lead, but the DVD player with what it says above, RCA phono type connections ? I have no idea what to buy? Do these connections come in a complete set? I don't what to look for.

I have to shop from home, and have no access to knowledgeable shop assistants, so I would be grateful for any help.
 

GaryB

Distinguished Member
Connecting the PVR to the TV using SCART is, as you suggested, the best way. It also means you get the benefit of the TV switching to the SCART input automatically when you switch the PVR on. This makes operation easier for aged parent.

The next thing you need to check is if the DVD player has an HDMI output. If it does, I would suggest you use that to connect it to the TV. You can do that with a standard HDMI cable. These are available for under a fiver. Don't buy from any of the big high street stores who will charge a lot more.

If the DVD player doesn't have HDMI, it will probably have Component output, but you need to check that too. If it does, you'll need a cable with three phono connectors for the video and two more for audio.

This Wikipedia article explains a bit more and shows what the connectors look like.

Component video - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Examples of cables at:

Component Video Cables
 

donka

Well-known Member
If in doubt, please post up a picture of the back of the DVD player or provide the make and model and we can advise.
 
S

Silver

Guest
Hi, thanks for your replies, and the helpful links. I've been doing my homework. I found the manual for the DVD player, (which doesn't have a HDMI connection), and the connection diagrams make things clearer.

Component Video Cables

"Is component video better than RGB? Well, yes and no, RGB provides the widest bandwidth and is the best choice for connecting audio visual devices like a Freeview box, digibox or Sky+ box to your TV, home cinema or home theatre system. DVD is however different, to reduce the amount of storage required DVDs are recorded using component video, it is therefore better to connect a DVD player via a component video cable to your TV, plasma or LCD TV etc"

Am I right in thinking, that any of the leads in the Component Leads Product List, would do to connect the DVD player to the TV?

"1m Component Cable - OFC Component Video Cable" What does OFC stand for, is it a different kind of lead?

I think Stereo Phono Cables are what I should be using for the audio part of the connection, am I correct?

Stereo Phono Cables - Next Day Delivery - Discount Prices at TVCables
 

donka

Well-known Member
Answers in blue

Component Video Cables


Am I right in thinking, that any of the leads in the Component Leads Product List, would do to connect the DVD player to the TV?

Yes. they all do the same job.

"1m Component Cable - OFC Component Video Cable" What does OFC stand for, is it a different kind of lead?

Oxygen Free Copper. Essentially it is regarded as higher quality with a cleaner connection.
I think Stereo Phono Cables are what I should be using for the audio part of the connection, am I correct?

Yes.

Stereo Phono Cables - Next Day Delivery - Discount Prices at TVCables
 

donka

Well-known Member
You are welcome. Have you checked to ensure the DVD player supports component output? It will have 5 phono jacks on the read, red, green & blue for video and white & red for audio.
 
S

Silver

Guest
Regarding my choice of the -
Humax Freeview PVR-9150T 160GB Twin Tuner PVR
and
Panasonic TX-L32C3B 32 inch TV
are there any compatibility issues I should know of?
 

donka

Well-known Member
Regarding my choice of the -
Humax Freeview PVR-9150T 160GB Twin Tuner PVR
and
Panasonic TX-L32C3B 32 inch TV
are there any compatibility issues I should know of?

None that I would be aware of. Scart to scart connection and all should be fine.
 
S

Silver

Guest
"Have you checked to ensure the DVD player supports component output?"
Hi Donka, yes it does thanks.

"Scart to scart connection and all should be fine" Is there any noticeable difference between a scart lead costing £25 and the same length costing £35?

SCART Splitter - 4 Way Switched RGB Support Only £7.75 at TVCables

My aged parent may want to watch videos occasionally, is this a good scart splitter? Good enough to use with a £35 1.5metre scart lead?
 

donka

Well-known Member
"Scart to scart connection and all should be fine" Is there any noticeable difference between a scart lead costing £25 and the same length costing £35?

Unlike digital connections like HDMI, Scart is an analogue connection and there is a difference in cable quality. In saying that, I would still buy a relatively inexpensive one - I think the most I ever spend on a quality scart cable was around £15 for a 3m version. The key thing to ensure is that it uses shielded cable to avoid interference and to try and avoid getting the cable mixed up or running right next to other cables, power cables etc. if possible. I would look on the auction site for a thick, shielded cable which typically will give you better performance. Be wary about buying from the high street as cables are one product that sellers use for a high markup. Case in point, my Dad just bought a HD PVR from Currys and they told him it would require an HDMI cable and they sold him one for £35. I told him to return it and buy one from Poundland. As it turned out, there was a cable in the box for the PVR already but even if there wasn't, he could save himself £34 for what is essentially the same product. Please note that it is worth investing a little more money in a scart cable than an HDMI cable though since scart is more prone to interference.
 
S

Silver

Guest
Please note that it is worth investing a little more money in a scart cable than an HDMI cable though since scart is more prone to interference.
Hi Donka, thank-you. :thumbsup:

Which of these is the better quality?

Profigold OFC High Definition Component RGB Video Cable: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

RGB Component and Optical Cable With Gold Plated: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

It's more of a grumble than a question. Normally one can tell which brands are the best quality, by a combination of price and customer reviews. I have found it impossible to do this with Component Video Cables and Stereo Phono Cables, without doing more research which I haven't the time for. Probably it doesn't matter though - eeny meeny miny moe . . . .
 

donka

Well-known Member
Silver said:
Hi Donka, thank-you. :thumbsup:

Which of these is the better quality?

Profigold OFC High Definition Component RGB Video Cable: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

RGB Component and Optical Cable With Gold Plated: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

It's more of a grumble than a question. Normally one can tell which brands are the best quality, by a combination of price and customer reviews. I have found it impossible to do this with Component Video Cables and Stereo Phono Cables, without doing more research which I haven't the time for. Probably it doesn't matter though - eeny meeny miny moe . . . .

It's hard to say without having prior experience with those cables. What I will say is I have bought things from Kenable in the past and was impressed with the quality and service for what it is worth.
 
S

Silver

Guest
Hi Donka, thanks again.

Does a high resolution TV have a crisper picture when viewing non HD freeview, or watching DVD's? I'm wondering whether it would be better for my aged parent to have a TV with a higher resolution than the model I had originally decided on.
 

donka

Well-known Member
Silver said:
Hi Donka, thanks again.

Does a high resolution TV have a crisper picture when viewing non HD freeview, or watching DVD's? I'm wondering whether it would be better for my aged parent to have a TV with a higher resolution than the model I had originally decided on.

Typically no although it depends on the hardware used. Standard definition material such as Freeview and DVD needs to be upscaled to be shown on an HD screen. If you are buying a modern flat screen TV then it will typically either be 720p or 1080p resolution, both of which are higher than SD. Some people think a 720p screen is better suited since it doesn't have to upscale the image as much but it is as much dependant on the processing involved. The larger the screen, the more obvious the issues in the upscaled image quality. To be honest you are best just to audition some TVs in a shop and see what works for you. If you are only watching SD and are after a modern flatscreen and not an old CRT then I believe Samsung & Sony are good at upscaling SD material. That is one of the reasons I am buying a Samsung TV.
 
S

Silver

Guest
Hi Donka, thanks for the clarification.

In the end I went with Panasonic, (it's what I have at home) and as luck would have it, I found an ex-display Panasonic on Ebay. My aged parent is pleased with the larger better quality TV, and the improvement in his viewing experience, although he hadn't initially thought it would make much difference.

Also on it's way is the Humax PVR, which I bought from the factory at a reduced price because it's reconditioned.

Humax PVR9150T-G Freeview twin tuner 160GB PVR (Grade A) - HUMAX UK Direct Sales Website

I saved about £75 by shopping around, over what I would have spent if I'd bought the TV and recorder from Amazon.

Unfortunately I had a moment of inattention, and I bought the wrong cables. I got the audio cables right, but bought these by mistake -

RGB Component and Optical Cable With Gold Plated: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

How are these different from the ones I should have bought?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

JayCee

Distinguished Member
If only the sound is coming through that suggests you've got the plugs in the wrong sockets.
To get sound and picture via a component connection requires 2 leads with 5 plugs...the component lead should have 3 plugs either end and the audio lead should have 2 plugs either end.
Use the lead you've linked to for the picture, the plugs and sockets they go into are colour coded at the DVD player and Tv connection panel and get a 2 phono to 2 phono plug lead for the audio connection.
 
S

Silver

Guest
Hi JayCee, thanks.
The cables you describle are what I have, and I've plugged the cables in and out several times according to the colour codes. The audio cables are working, but I'm getting no picture. I've tried them on a different TV, but to no avail.

"Are you getting any kind of image at all or is it a black screen?"
I'm getting no picture at all - I'm wondering if the cables are faulty.
 

JayCee

Distinguished Member
I wouldn't think the cables are faulty...probably a setting somewhere.
What's the make and model of Tv?
Are you selecting the correct input with it's remote?
Have you gone into the DVD players menu and set it to output component?
 

lynx

Senior Moderator
Have you gone into the DVD players menu and set it to output component?

I suspect JayCee has hit the nail on the head here.
 

donka

Well-known Member
Component & composite both share the same audio connections so if you have audio and no video then it is likely one or both devices are set to the opposite of the connection you are using. In this instance you are using component so check the dvd player is outputting component and not composite. Same goes for your tv input, ensure it is set to component and not composite.
 
S

Silver

Guest
OK I've got it sorted, all systems are go!

Thanks guys for your support.

It was the output setting on the DVD player that needed adjusting. The DVD player manual wasn't very helpful regarding this problem; it failed to point out that, to put the DVD player on the right setting for connection with a video component cable, it had to be initially connected with a scart cable. It's common sense to work that out, but a complete newbie might be a bit flummoxed.

Then having described the component video cables as being red blue and green, it then told you, of the two settings - RGB and interlace - to chose interlace, which seems on the surface a bit illogical.

Wikipedia doesn't help -
"RGB is also the term referring to a type of component video signal used in the video electronics industry. It consists of three signals—red, green, and blue—carried on three separate cables/pins."

And then there's this -
"Is component video better than RGB? Well, yes and no, RGB provides the widest bandwidth and is the best choice for connecting audio visual devices like a Freeview box, digibox or Sky+ box to your TV, home cinema or home theatre system. DVD is however different, to reduce the amount of storage required DVDs are recorded using component video, it is therefore better to connect a DVD player via a component video cable to your TV, plasma or LCD TV etc"

So what does RGB refer to in this context?
 

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