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Banding/Artefacts in VHS image when transferred to Mini DV and PC

xccxxx

Standard Member
I'm currently in the process of converting some of my old VHS tapes to a digital format - to do this I have been recording my VHS on to Mini DV and then capturing the tape via Firewire and Adobe Premiere to the PC. It all seems to be working reasonably well, but I've just noticed some weird artefacts in one of the transfers and am a bit stumped on what it is and how to fix it.

The problem is not present when watching playback straight from the VHS tape, but once I capture it to Mini DV there are a lot of horizontal type lines in bright spots on the picture. I've uploaded some images here to show what I mean.

On my wife's orange jacket the lines are present, but in the rest of the image they don't occur. Does anyone know what this might be and why it is occurring (and best of all, how to fix it! :) ). I've searched around a bit today and thinking it might be aliasing or moire, but I'm really not so sure on either of those and why it would only occur on those particular spots of the picture.

Thanks for any help and suggestions!

2ztc0v6.jpg


dbjph.jpg
 

rogs

Well-known Member
Try de-interlacing the footage. I'm sure Premiere will have the appropriate tools to allow you to do that, but I'm not a Premiere user myself, so I can't advise on the specifics.

Both VHS and DV utilise an 'interlaced' file structure, which was a format originally used by TV broadcasters to minimise bandwidth. Although VHS players, DV cameras and analogue TVs can 'de-interlace' footage well on the fly, PCs prefer 'progressive' footage format, and don't necessarily handle interlaced footage well.
Best to convert to progressive to deal with the problem.
 

xccxxx

Standard Member
Thanks rogs. I'm aware of the deinterlace feature and have been using it for other conversions, but unfortunately that doesn't seem to help here. It does look a bit like the effect that interlaced footage gives, but it's restricted to just the bright spots of the picture. Thanks for the suggestion though!
 

rogs

Well-known Member
The other thing that springs to mind is 'herring bone' interference. That is like the video equivalent of audio 'hum', and is often caused by poor screening of the connection leads. You don't say how you are connecting the VHS player to your MiniDV camcorder, but I have had problems in the past with some RCA (phono) leads. The screening on some of the cheaper ones can be very 'iffy', and can introduce 'hum' onto the video (and audio) signals.
Just a thought...
 

xccxxx

Standard Member
Thanks, I think you might be right in that the quality of the cables could be an issue, unfortunately they can't easily be swapped out as its an RCA to some type of non standard jack that plugs into the Mini DV camera itself. I'm going to buy a USB converter and bypass the mini dv tape altogether, that will allow me to use different cables and also bypass the step of having to record on the tape altogether. Thanks again for the suggestions!
 

Member 55145

Distinguished Member
You are going to get this with composite. Either use s-video or if you can get hold of a Panasonic or JVC VHS-DVD deck. It was the best way to do it when I worked converting VHS to digital.

Trust me, you won't be disappointed :thumbsup:
 

grahamlthompson

In memoriam
Thanks, I think you might be right in that the quality of the cables could be an issue, unfortunately they can't easily be swapped out as its an RCA to some type of non standard jack that plugs into the Mini DV camera itself. I'm going to buy a USB converter and bypass the mini dv tape altogether, that will allow me to use different cables and also bypass the step of having to record on the tape altogether. Thanks again for the suggestions!

Doesn't your camcorder have the option to capture AV and convert to DV directly via the camera to a PC firewire port without having to use tape ? My Sony does. USB converters I have tried aren't very good.

The expensive option is a stand alone DV converter.

eg


Grass Valley ADVC55

Regarding your banding issue, ideally you need to find a vcr with a built in comb filter.
 

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