Baahh! Drive failure dilemma

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by Goof, Jul 23, 2018.

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  1. Goof

    Goof
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    I'd just bought my first SSD in addition to a WD purple HDD (intended for CCTV system) - in prep for cloning my old HDD to SSD I temporarily transferred some old files onto the WD drive. Fresh out the packet, data was on there temporarily for all of 6 hours and the WD drive fails :mad:

    Getting click of death and when connected as slave it's failing to show in BIOS or windows.
    I tried the 'freezer trick', which surprisingly didn't blow it up, but neither did it work. I also tried a recovery program to get the data off the original drive (I'd cut & pasted files because the SSD had less storage) but haven't been able to find everything.

    So, I could try opening the HDD case to see if the heads can be re-positioned (which I don't mind doing) but the warranty would obviously be invalidated. Seems like a double kick in the teeth to not even get a replacement but I really want the data.

    Any other suggestions? It's the last WD I'll be buying :(
     
  2. EndlessWaves

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    This sort of thing happens to every brand or model, I wouldn't let it put you off WD drives based on a single example.

    You don't have any other copies knocking around? Perhaps a drive from an old computer?
     
  3. Goof

    Goof
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    I'm going to try another recovery program on the original drive, I would think it's still 'there' as it's only just been cut/pasted off the drive and there's not been any substantial overwrite.
    Part of the issue is also that I can't even remember all the content that I put on that drive, so I want to access it also as a reference to see what I may potentially still have elsewhere.
     
  4. dms

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    Really sorry to hear it.

    Personally if the data really matters I'd stop trying to do anything to the disk and get it to a professional recovery company to try. It may be expensive but they know what they're doing and have the best tools for the job.

    You may be a pro but most of the time "joe blogs" or even "It dude" efforts do more harm than good to a drive if it's had a electrical / mechanical failure.

    If you want to work off the SSD to try and recover files I definitely recommend taking a full image of it first and working off the image. I must admit though I've not been happy with recover tools I've used recently and would just send off a disk if the data mattered now-a-days.

    Ditto. I've been dealing with hardware for over 30 years and I had a large number of DoA or 1st week fails from all sorts of companies. It really is just one of those things most of the time. With WD we have lord knows how many of their Red Drives and they've been very good overall.
     
  5. ChuckMountain

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    Yes unfortunately you don't know if a courier or somebody else in the supply chain has decided to play touch rugby with your newest drive, unlikely but you never know.

    There are quite a few good undelete programs on the web some free. Something like Recuva should work on your old drive and restore most of the data. I appreciate it's not straight forward working out what you have moved but this should give you a fairly good indication.

    For the future I would always have more than backup copy of your important data.

    You will void your warranty if you open the drive, particularly as one of the screws is usually under the sticker. Drives these days are very easy to break and I would just be getting the retailer to send you a replacement.
     
  6. Goof

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    Yes, thanks guys, part of the problem is I haven't discerned all of what was on it yet, so don't know if any of it's critical. I have been through numerous drive failures myself in that past too, it's just one of those things...the data was only going to be on there for a few hours before I backed up again to an additional source. Sod's law :confused:
     
  7. dms

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    Sods law... yes... the first time I got burned I was a young guy and bought a disk to back stuff onto... as this was a long time ago external drives weren't out there and I had to plug it inside my machine to be ready to copy the files over between drives.... our friend sod turned up and the old disk failed during a reboot (Windows, which was on the old drive of course, saying "need to restart to make hardware changes, i.e. see the new drive).

    I ended up taking the dead drive to a company called Vogon and they provided a schedule of everything they could recovery (which was everything I needed). Unfortunately I couldn't afford the recovery costs... the initial examination fee set me back too much already! The stuff I lost was impossible to replace but I was lucky I had done a network backup about 9 months before and so it wasn't "everything".

    So based on that and some other experiences I have a very high level of what counts as a backup... I know it's far too late and utterly unhelpful but in my case a bare minimum is a snapshotting NAS with redundant raid sync'd to an offsite replica. Ok, cloud services are much easier for most people ;-)

    //Anyways... good luck!
     
  8. ChuckMountain

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    Out of interest how much was the initial price and subsequent recovery fee?

    Just so others have an ideal of ball park ?
     

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