AVS Video Converter

TechiMan

Active Member
Has anyone used a program called AVS Video Converter and whether they have had any issues with it?. I'm trying to convert various video files to DVD (mainly a combination of MPEG4 and MTS files. I converted some files last using the "DVD PAL 720x576 - High Quality (HQ 60/108 min. at 1 DVD/DL DVD Disc" setting, and the resulting outputted video seemed fine and the correct frame size. However, when I did another conversion using the same settings the video size when viewed through VLC player was smaller. Why that is I don't know. No idea what the "HQ 60/108 min. at 1 DVD/DL DVD Disc" is all about as, far as I'm aware, to fit a video onto a DVD (MPEG2) in the highest quality is around 60 mins of video.

There seems to be alot of very poor programs out there I would say.
 

next010

Distinguished Member
DVD-R DL is a dual layer DVD-R that has a capacity of around 8GB, a regular DVD-R is around 4GB in capacity. Look at your discs it should list the size on the label.

Using a DVD-R DL allows higher quality video.

HQ mean high quality for 60/108 minute length video.

So that preset is basically saying use this for video that is 1-2 hours on a DVD-R DL.

Videos wont come out at the same size all the time, it depends on the source material and settings the encoder is using. From looking at the guide on the AVS site it has an advanced section were you can alter the bitrate if you want to manually force it higher but keep in mind you cannot go past the capacity limits of DVD-R.
 

TechiMan

Active Member
DVD-R DL is a dual layer DVD-R that has a capacity of around 8GB, a regular DVD-R is around 4GB in capacity. Look at your discs it should list the size on the label.

Using a DVD-R DL allows higher quality video.

HQ mean high quality for 60/108 minute length video.

So that preset is basically saying use this for video that is 1-2 hours on a DVD-R DL.

Videos wont come out at the same size all the time, it depends on the source material and settings the encoder is using. From looking at the guide on the AVS site it has an advanced section were you can alter the bitrate if you want to manually force it higher but keep in mind you cannot go past the capacity limits of DVD-R.
Thanks,

Yes I am aware of the capacity of a DVD disc as being 4.7GB and dual layer being 8GB. As I've said I haven't changed any of the settings, bitrate, framerate, framesize etc, but I'm now getting a converted video that is smaller in resolution.

To illustrate what I mean, here's some screenshots taken from playing the videos in fullscreen in VLC player from the .TS folders prior to burning to DVD. Screenshot 2 (which I converted today into a separate TS folder) is clearly a different frame resolution for some reason, although in the properties they both state they are 720x576, so they should be the same. Again, I just browsed the video files and clicked on the same video setting and clicked convert.

I think the reason for the strange frame size is down to being set to 4:3 instead of 16:9, and changing it seems to have corrected the problem. However, during another conversion it's saying that the output size is too big (4.7gb) which is strange as 4.7gb is enough to fit onto a disc. When I remove the file (which is only 35mb in size) and click on convert it's now saying that the output size is too big (4.63 GB). How does that make sense?. Even If I removed another 3 files it would still say the output size is too big. Very bizarre program. Whoever designed AVS Video Converter didn't know what they were doing.

I've noticed when I've been able to convert the files and have checked the disc capacity, there was about 1GB more that could've been added, yet this program doesn't seem to let you do a full 4GB disc only just over 3GB.
 

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DjDessel

Novice Member
Guys, I have a music video clip, I need to convert it to different formats, for YouTube to mp3 (I'm sorry, I wanted to write .mp4), for my website I need to place it in mp4. The videographer provided me with a video in MOV format. With this application, I can convert videos quickly, and is there a free version in it?
 
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EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
MP3 normally refers to an audio-only format that won't store video.

I'm not familiar with AVS Video Converter, I'd normally just use handbrake if you're working with common formats.
 

iqoniq

Well-known Member
I'm not familiar with AVS Video Converter, I'd normally just use handbrake if you're working with common formats.
This. Handbrake is really useful once you realise what everything does (it's not always intuitive).

There's also WinFF by BiggMatt, and although it's discontinued (he's taken it as far as he wants, but it's still avilable) it's quite capable. It's basically a front end for FFMPEG, but it handles a load of other formats, allows you to easily set various parameters or use presets, and is usually faster than other encoders. There's another advantage in that it opens a shell window with verbose logs, so if something messes up or there's any warnings you can see what's happening in real time, as opposed to watching a progress bar and a program then spitting out it's dummy because something has happened.

Edit to add:
@DjDessel MOV is a file in the Apple QuickTime File Format. The QTFF is proprietary, which means that it's not using an open source licence. You need a converter capable of converting QuickTime files, and some may require a separate installation of the QuickTime software.

Is MOV still a thing with Apple, because I haven't seen that format in years.
 
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Darui

Novice Member
Handbrake has a very inconvenient interface. FFMPEG is convenient if this library is installed. Here code for ffmpeg
Code:
ffmpeg -i my_file.mov -c copy output.mp4
it is not very difficult to install the library. But it seems to me that not everyone will be able to figure it out, and one mistake in the code set and nothing will happen.
I would argue about the conversion speed. Converted the mov to mp4 video here. Movavi quickly converts even large videos, I often convert animations that latest about an hour. We make animations as a whole team. Our animations are educational videos.
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Edit to add:
@DjDessel MOV is a file in the Apple QuickTime File Format. The QTFF is proprietary, which means that it's not using an open source licence. You need a converter capable of converting QuickTime files, and some may require a separate installation of the QuickTime software.

Is MOV still a thing with Apple, because I haven't seen that format in years.

The quicktime video format is long dead, if this is a new file it'll be H.264 video in a MOV container which handbrake and other common video conversion programs will have no trouble with.

Handbrake has a very inconvenient interface.

For converting a single file? I've never found it so. It's perhaps a little cluttered, but there's a documentation and a quick start guide that points out the important elements if you're not familiar with video stuff:
 

TechiMan

Active Member
A few days ago I converted a few MP4 files to MPEG2 using a much lower bit rate (this was using a programme called Video to Video, which from my experience of using it seems to mess video frame sizes up whenever it feels like it. The original video bitrate of the file (according to the programme) was 2000, so I lowered the bitrate to 540. The original file was about 2GB, yet when I converted the video, the outputted file was over 4GB. I thought a lower bitrate was supposed to reduce the file size, so why was I getting twice the size of the original even when it was converted to a different format and at a much lower video bitrate?. It seems that this problem occurs with this particular programme, probably because whoever developed it was an idiot, and the fact that it's free. However, it does have its good points which is why I still use it, for example, it allows you to merge files together and convert them to various formats, including as a "Direct Stream Copy", and no other programme I've used seems to do this, and also it's pretty fast at converting, but sometimes it doesn't merge the files together, instead you see the progress bar jump to the end and there's no file been converted, which is very strange.
 

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