Question AVR, TV, Sources, HDMI?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by nheather, Jun 19, 2015.

  1. nheather

    nheather
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    Okay imagine I have

    A wall-mounted TV with 4 HDMI inputs and supports ARC

    An AVR that has 4 HDMI in and 1 HDMI out and supports ARC

    The following HDMI devices

    Gaming PC
    Amazon Fire TV
    Bluray Player

    What's the best way to connect it all up.

    Initial thought Devices >> AVR >> TV as this gives simple wiring to TV

    But then I think that this means that all devices run on the same TV HDMI and therefore under the same profile.

    In particular, you would normal set the HDMI for the Gaming PC to have the lowest possible input lag at a slight compromise to picture quality.

    Also I assume that the PC going through the AVR would add to the input lag.

    Cheers,

    Nigel
     
  2. dante01

    dante01
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    It is generally best to always have sources connected directly to the receiver. ARC can only output stereo in relation to external sources connected to a TV and it is only when accessing audio via a TV's own tuner(s) or SMART features that you'd get discrete 5.1 Dolby Digital or DTS via either ARC or the TV's digital audio output. ARC is also less capable than conventional HDMI as far as audio is concered and would be limited to the same audio as associated with S/PDIF. You cannot convey multichannel PCM or HD formats such as DTS-HD Master Audio or Dolby's TrueHD via either ARC or S/PDIF.

    Lag and audio sync issues are more often than not caused by video processing, either applied by a device prior to the TV or via the TV itself. try not to use such processing wherever possible.
     
  3. nheather

    nheather
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    Yes, so when I'm talking about input lag, I do mean video.

    The important one is PC gamining. A computer monitor might be 8mS, whereas a TV could be anyware between 30-120mS.

    I have a Sony TV chosen because it has a sub 30mS lag but to acheive that you have to choose the profile and rename the HDMI port to 'PC'.

    But if I put all through the AVR then they just use one input on the TV. The best TV setting for the PC might not be the best for the BDP.

    I am also guessing that the AVR HDMI bypass will add to the video input lag.

    So do you set the TV up as best for movies or best for gaming.


    Cheers,

    Nigel
     
  4. dante01

    dante01
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    If simply passing the video through a receiver via HDMI without employing any video processing to the video signal then there should be no lag in association with the receiver. There are certain receivers that do appear to apply some processing you have no control over, but ese are issue that are exceptions to the rule as opposed to being the rule. It would only be at the TV when any lag is present. Most TVs have a gaming mode that reduces the processing carried out by the TV to the bare minimum required. I'd suggest you apply the gaming mode if concerned about the lag. You'll not eliminate the lag altogeth, but you can minimise it. The issue is does your TV have easy acces to its gaming mode?

    I'm not a big gamer so set my TV up for movies. I use the same input and picture configuration for all my sources. I can change the setting very easily to another set of configurations via a sub menu if I want. No idea if this is practical with your Sony TV?
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2015
  5. nheather

    nheather
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    Thanks, I suspect that you are right, unless the AVR is trying to do up-scaling it should add much.

    Just torn, equally it would be nice have the Fire TV and BDP connected to HDMI which is set up for movies and the PC connected to an HDMI set up for gaming.

    I was thinking maybe of a hybrid. The Fire TV and BDP connected to the AVR connected to the TV, and the PC connected to the TV connected to the AVR over ARC

    But if you say that ARC only supports stereo that would limit the PC sound.

    Cheers,

    Nigel
     
  6. dante01

    dante01
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    Yes, it would restrict the audio to stereo if the source is connected to the TV and passing it through the TV, but ARC can carry multichannel audio if the source is the TV itself.
     

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