Question AVR and Ventilation

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by nheather, Jul 5, 2015.

  1. nheather

    nheather
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    I am becoming very frustrated.

    I am doing a garage conversion where the TV is very much a secondary use - there will be no satellite or terrestrial feeds, just a PC and BDP - and the use will typically be 70% gaming, 20% internet browsing and 10% BDP.

    The plan has changed many times over the last month

    Initially just TV speakers (£0)
    Then soundbar without sub-woofer (£150)
    Then soundbar with sub-woofer (£200)
    Then budget 5.1 system (£500)

    Space is limited so to achieve a 5.1 I need to look at the slim-line AVRs from the likes of Pioneer (S310) and Marantz (NR1504). Of these I prefer the Marantz.

    Thought I had this all sorted, I could just about fit everything in, even bought some speakers, but then I read something in the Marantz NR1504 manual.

    Although the Marantz is just 105mm high, compared with a minimum of 150mm for a standard AVR, the manual states that it requires a minimum of 300mm rack height.

    That's seems a bit nuts, what's the point of promoting the product with the benefits of fitting in smaller spaces when they then insist that you must fit it in a rack easily big enough for a standard AVR.

    So how important is ventilation?

    I appreciate that more is always better but realistically what headroom do you need?

    I also appreciate it depends on how hard you will push it - in my case it is for small speakers and I don't particularly like things really loud. And I will be sitting pretty close to the TV (less than 2m).

    I can't imagine many people out there are running with 20cm headroom above their AVR.

    Thought I had it all sorted but I am losing the will to live - seriously considering going back to a simple solution that will save me money, effort (no wiring, chasing walls etc.) and stress - a Q Acoustic M4 is on my mind.

    Cheers,

    Nigel
     
  2. dante01

    dante01
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    You can reduce the space above it, but I'd tend to try ensure that there's space around it to allow air to flow. I'd not enclose it within a closed cabinet. You could probably leave less than 1cm above the unit without incidence, but this could shorten the life of the receiver long term? I think 10 - 15cm more realistic a proposal than 30cm?

    You wouldn't need to push the receiver very much for it to be able to attain reference levels in a garage. I'd tend to not use low impedance or hard to drive speakers with it though. You'd have to be abusing the receiver and be playing audio at levels that can damage your hearing in order to cause problems with it in such a small space.
     
  3. nheather

    nheather
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    Typically, how efficient are AV Receivers.

    I appreciate that they could be throwing a lot of power out to the speakers but if the design is efficient there shouldn't be much wasted as heat in the hardware itself.

    Also my speakers have a sensitivity of 85 dB which I believe means that they need 1W to generate 85 dB of sound.

    It's a logarithmic scale so I believe that you have to double the power for every 3dB increase. So

    1W 85dB
    2W 88dB
    4W 91dB
    8W 94dB
    16W 97dB
    32W 100dB
    64W 103dB

    Is that correct?

    I don't tend to listen loud - in my living room the AVR seems to be set so that 0.0dB on the display equates to 80dB (according to my SPL meter).

    We never have it as loud as 0dB (typically -30 to -20). Probably why I have never noticed any sign of temperature on my Denon AVR.

    Cheers,

    Nigel
     
  4. dante01

    dante01
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    The sensitivity rating is as measured from 1m away so should be used to compare one speaker to another rather than apraise speakers in association with your listening position within any given location.

    How efficient a receiver is isn't important because their rating is in relation to their output anyway and not their efficiency. The rating is what they output irrespective of their effeciency. Class D amplifiers tend to be more effecient than A/B amps though so tend to run cooler at higher volumes or while powering harder to drive loads. The Pioneer is a class D amp.

    0db will equate (be relative to) to 85db as measured from your primary listening position in association with a correctly calibrated setup. 85db is the reference volume to which all AV setups calibrate themselves and 0db is the relative volume which represents this. Even if wanting to attain 0db then you'd easilly be able to do so without issue within a garage while using a relatively low end AV receiver driving most commonly available speakers.
     

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