aventage A-860 advice

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by Isaac12, Jan 16, 2017.

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  1. Isaac12

    Isaac12
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    Hi
    Id like some advice with an issue im having.
    What im using: A-860 aventage/ 100w richter speakers 7.1/ bluray source 7.1

    so my question is this. I had this exact setup with my old pioneer avr. No issues sounded pretty awesome.
    Now. I upgraded to the above AVR.
    I have auto calibrated using ypao.
    I found the centre speaker volume level to be way too low.
    I manually set it at +4db in comparison to other speakers that are set at 0.0db or less.
    Its still way too low ?????? i generally use to have the main volume set at around -20db.
    Now with this yamaha i have it set at -13.5 db...just to get the same kind of volume?
    EVen at this volume and with the centre at +4db above other speakers.The centre is way way too quite. Its like i have to sit really close to it just to hear it ..then all of a sudden the other speakers will blast away at super high volume?? I dont get it..why would this be happening? why is the centre so damn quite ? LIke i mentioned, with my pioneer i didnt have this issue at all.
    Any help would be much appreciated.
    Also, does anyone know of any good tutorials for manually calibrating this AVR?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. dante01

    dante01
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    It is impossible to say whether the receiver's levels are incorrect without actually measuring those levels.

    Use an SPL meter to measure the SPL levels of the speakers. All the speakers should be the same SPL as measured from your primary listening position. Manually output a test tone from the receiver while while measuring the speaker levels.

    If the levels are all the same then the receiver is correctly calibrated. This will give you the results intended by anyone mixing surround sound soundtrack. If you find the centre level still too low even if correctly calibrated then this is a matter of your own personal preference as opposed to the receiver being incorrectly calibrated.

    Note that surround sound is mixed at a relatively loud reference volume, louder than you'd normally listen to audio at home. This unfortunately means that some of the quieter aspects of a soundtrack such as dialogue can be lost or diminished at the lower master volume levels used within a home when compared to how they were supposed to be played within a movie theatre. Many people come to the conclusion that the centre speaker level is at fault and causing this when it is simply a matter of the dynamic range of the soundtrack that isn't being fully exploited. Many receivers have Adaptive or dynamic DRC modes that compress the dynamic range in order to boost the quieter aspects of the soundtrack at lower than reference master volume levels. Try engaging both the receiver's Adaptive DRC and YPAO Volume settings in order to enhance the quieter aspects of soundtracks at lower listening levels.

    You'll not really gain anything by manually calibrating the receiver, but if you decide to persue this then simply measure and adjust the level of each speaker so that you get a reading of 85db relative to a master volume level of 0db for each and every speaker as measured from your primary listening position. Then measure the distance from your primary listening position to each speaker and enter these distances into the associated distance configurations within the receiver's settings. I'd also suggest you set all speakers as being SMALL and use appropriate crossvers for the associated speakers.
     
  3. Isaac12

    Isaac12
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    hi
    thanks for the advice.
    Ill have to carefully read through everything you say there and try and work it out. Its a bit complicated, but ill get there.
    Just one more question. Do you know of any good youtube tutorials that would help me with this kind of thing? Manual calibration of yammy receivers etc? i have google some of the terms used in the on screen display such as Dynamic range, parametric equalization etc ...I just couldnt find any helpful information.
    I did read the manual..It just wasnt very user friendly imo..
    A decent tutorial for beginners would be fantastic..
    cheers
     
  4. dante01

    dante01
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    No, there's no YouTube video giving guidance on all the settings and or configuration options associated with your receiver. I'd read what it says in the manual in association with anything you are not familiar with. If you still can't grasp its purpose then maybe ask within this thread or within one of the other threads where the A860 or other Yamaha receivers are being discussed.

    I'd forget about trying to manually configure the Parametric EQ (PEQ). This is basically the receiver's EQ room correction and not really something you can do by ear. The receiver measures various aspects of your room's acoustics and then filters its output so that the resulting audio fits with pre determined target curves. I'd leave the receiver to do this rather than attempting to manually configure it. It's like a graphic equaliser on steroids.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2017
  5. Isaac12

    Isaac12
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    FIXED IT !! After a tonne of research and reading through dozens of comments by Yamaha owners who have the same issue.
    I fixed it. you have to set Adaptive DRC to "on" and dymamic range to max.
    Not sure what they do..But dialogue sounds a lot better now.
     
  6. dante01

    dante01
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    Adaptve DRC compresses the audio's dynamic range relative to the master volume. THe closer the master volume is to 0db then the less compression is applied. THe compression forces the quieter aspects of the soundtrack up while leaving the louder aspects untouched. THis compensates for listening to audio at volume levels below the reference levels they were mixed in accordance with, the same reference level your receiver calibrates itself in accordance with and sets the master volume scale to.
     
  7. Isaac12

    Isaac12
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    Thanks for the explanation. Im still trying to work all this out. It will take some time. Can i ask though. When you refer to reference levels calibrated by the receiver, are we talking about the speaker level ie centre +1.0db , surround back 0.0db etc etc? Are they reference levels?
    Also when you state "compression is applied", does that mean the quality of the audio is diminished in any way?
    If you were the owner of an aventage 870 would you set DRC to on? and dynamic range to max? or would you try and fix this manually some other way?
    sorry for the noobish questions. I find it a bit complicated to understand. But i am trying to learn. ;)
     
  8. dante01

    dante01
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    The levels are adjustment to the speakers that were applied by the receiver so that each speakers' test tone output equates to the same sound pressure level as measured from your primary listening position. Your primary listening position is where you should initially place the mic during the YPAO calibration. The receiver also equalises the speaker levels so that 0db (relative) master volume equates to reference. The reference level would be the same as that used during the mix of movie soundtracks so 0db equates to about 85db in real terms if measuring a pink noise test tone at 0db master volume.

    The dynamic range of the audio wouldn't be as it was during the mix if employing dynamic range compression so you'd not hear the full range of the audio as it was heard by the person mixing the soundtrack. Dynamic range compression does allow you to play audio at lower volume levels though without the quieter aspects being made inaudible. In a perfect world you'd not use DRC and you'd leave the master volume level set to 0db, but this isn't practical for most home setups where neighbours and or other family members may not appreciate the higher noise levels.

    If listening to audio at below reference levels then yes, I'd use dynamic range compression to try compensate and make quieter aspects of the soundtrack audible at lower master volume levels.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2017
  9. dante01

    dante01
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  10. Isaac12

    Isaac12
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    I see. Kind of makes sense now. Thanks for the links, ill have a good read through them. I could turn DRC off but then i would i have to go back to cranking up the volume to -13.5 db..Im worried thats just too much for 100w speakers, could damage them im not sure. Id rather keep them at around -20db..Ill have a read through all the links then decide. Thanks alot for the info its being very helpful. cheers
     
  11. dante01

    dante01
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    Your receiver hasn't enough power available to exceed your speakers' rated handling. It is very doubtful that you'd blow or damage the speakers. This would however also depend upon the sensitivity of the speakers, but I can't foresee you having any issues attaining reference without damaging them in a small to medium sized room.
     
  12. Isaac12

    Isaac12
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    ok ...i think i still have a lot to learn here lol . Thanks for the reply
     

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