Avchd playback on laptop issue..

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by skunkwerx, Jul 8, 2015.

  1. skunkwerx

    skunkwerx
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    Hi again, similar post to my previous but as some time has passed, thought I'd post.

    So, first question, when transferring video files from camcorder to Laptop, should I remove the SD card from the camcorder and plug it into the SD slot on the laptop, or is it ok to use the supplied USB cable and Panasonic software to transfer files? Is there any advantage to plugging the SD card in directly to my Laptop? Its a 32GB Class 10.

    Next, When I have transferred an AVCHD file to Laptop, even if I play the RAW file, it plays fine for a couple of minutes then starts to break up and cut in and out audibly. The video footage lags and stutters too.
    When I play this file back directly on the camcorders LCD screen, it plays perfect.

    The laptop is an old ish HP Pavilion G series, 4gb RAM, etc.

    Cheers All!
     
  2. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    Either way is fine, so just do what suites you best.
    Most people tend to not use the Panasonic software as they find it just easier to drag & drop the files across manually. But if you prefer the ease of using it then there is no real reason not to. It does copy extra housekeeping files that are generally not required, but they are small and can be deleted if you want to tidy things up.

    Removing the SD card and putting it directly into the camcorder does save a little bit of extra work for the camcorder, so if battery life is low you may as well remove the card. But if that is not a concern then yet again just do what you find the easiest.
    It does sound like your laptop specs are a little low for AVCHD playback, but it could also be down to the software you use - what playback software are you using?
    You can normally find the suggested specs for the software and see if your laptop is as good as required, or if not try something else as it may work better.
    This may be a useful read: http://geeknizer.com/1080p-minimum-requirements/

    Mark.
     
  3. skunkwerx

    skunkwerx
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    Thanks for the reply and info bud. I currently play files both raw and rendered through windows media player. Mp4 format edits, plays and renders fine with no problems.. The AVCHD just looks that much crisper though!
     
  4. Terfyn

    Terfyn
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    I think Mark has got the answer. When I use my video editor for AVCHD, I occasionally get glitches and stuttering on the preview playback and my PC is reasonably gutsy. When the edited video is rendered (usually to AVCHD) the stuttering disappears. So PC power may be the answer.
     
  5. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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  6. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson
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  7. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson
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    No maybe it is. Your video editor has to recode any edits you make to the original video source on the fly to preview unless you pre-render the content.

    This includes transitions between clips (other than straight cuts). Any video overlays onto the video tracks like titles and any video effects you may have applied. Because AVCHD is a mpeg compressed format the timeline does not contain data for each and every frame. Unless your edit happens to fall on the only frame within a mpeg group of pictures that has the only full set of pixels and so does the end, then the editor has to go back to the previous Iframe and recreate the actual pixels for the frames that require re-coding to produce the preview. This requires a lot of processing power.

    As had been posted many times before there are 4 possible solutions.

    1 One convert your video to a format that contains the full pixel data for every frame (intraframe format). Pros - Even low powered PC's can cope with intraframe formats and handle real time edit previews. Cons - Creating the source footage takes time and the resulting files are very large. (Basically reversing the camcorder compression that allowed recording HD Video to a SD card in the first place)

    2 Create low res copies of your clips and edit using these. In the final render the video editor will apply all your editing decisions to the real clips. The final render will of course take longer on a low powered PC (You can of course go to bed, go on holiday etc while the render takes place)

    3 Depending on your editor capability, select an area of the timeline that is especially complex and pre-render to a separate file. Once done this section of the timeline will be previewed at full speed from the rendered file. This capability tends to be confined to the more advanced video editors. The Sony consumer video editing software is able to do this. Pros - Because you are rendering relatively small areas of the timeline it's a relatively quick solution. Cons - Your video editing software may not support

    4 Premiere Pro allows you to assemble complex sequences within the programme as separate timelines and incorporate these into the main timeline as a single clip. Edits to the sequence are directly reflected in the timeline containing the whole project. This is the easiest approach to complex projects.

    5 Sadly Sony Vegas doesn't emulate this (Come on Sony :)). However there is a workaround, you can run multiple instances of Sony Vegas and create your complex sequences and simply transfer them to the master project window as complete and pre-rendered sequences.
     
  8. 12harry

    12harry
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    glt, yr 5 ( Post=No 7.), - I find Sony Movie Studio is similar - I can open several copies and work on a short sequence; then put it on the "master" timeline.
    +I regularly use the "Loop Render" mode as well, e.g. When there is something that needs precise sync. - but this is only to check the final Render is behaving how I want it.
    However, I believe there is a snag with using multiple copies - since Windows allocates some Memory for each prog. Therefore for the fastest processing it's best to have only one program running.

    If folks have 64-bit with oodles of Memory, I guess this doesn't matter.
     
  9. rogs

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    The various 'tricks' and 'work-rounds' to make highly compressed HD video formats suitable for editing seem to be like the old joke about 'how many Irishmen does it take to put a screw in the wall?....Answer? 100 - One to hold the screwdriver, and 99 to turn the wall round'.

    I'm a great fan of using GLTs option #1.... convert to an intraframe intermediate format, and make the whole process simpler, more accurate - and overall a more pleasant experience. (like it used to be with DV in the 'old days').

    With an i5 or i7 or better, you can convert HD video to an intraframe file in faster than real time -- which is better than it was in the days of DV capture.....

    But the consumer video editor manufacturers do try and sell the dream of importing video straight from your camera/phone into the editor, pressing button 'B', and getting a Hollywood blockbuster out the other end...

    The fact that doesn't work very well with HD video much of the time is why we often get frustrated 'noobs' who don't understand why many editors don't really do what they say on the tin...at least not unless you have a computer that could power NASA on it's own....:)
     

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