AV Receiver or TV?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by ABTForce4, May 27, 2008.

  1. ABTForce4

    ABTForce4
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    Hi Guys. I have just upgraded my TV to the new 6 Series Samsung (very pleased with it so far :D)

    Anyway, not sure if this belongs in this section but here goes. I was wondering what is the best way to connect all my AV equipment. Should it all go through the AV Receiver (means I need a new one since mine does not have HDMI or component video) or should I just plug it into the TV? What are the benefits/losses of connecting it either way?

    Thankin you in advance
     
  2. davepuma

    davepuma
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    The only real benefit in connecting video cables via an AV receiver is for convenience, which depending on the capabilities of the AV receiver result in just one video output cable going to the display. This has the downside in that you can only calibrate that one input on the display. I use individual inputs on my project which are calibrated for each source. However, if you want HD audio and HDMI is the only option, you have to use it. Some AV receivers (amps) can upconvert analogue sources to another signal type. On some older and lesser spec'd amps this might be to component video (YpBpR) which is analogue and on most newer amps, they will upconvert all analogue sources (composite video, s-video and component video) to HDMI. If you have sources that use RGB SCART, forget connecting them to an AV receiver, unless you invest in a converter and additional cabling.

    It really depends on what kit you have exactly so without knowing that, I can't fully answer but in all honesty I would only connect via an AV receiver for video if I have to. Leave the AV receiver to deal with audio as that's primarily what they're for.
     
  3. Mark.Yudkin

    Mark.Yudkin
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    Do as I do and connect all of the video straight to the TV (HDMI or SCART as applicable). Running through the receiver has no advantages.

    Splitting HD audio from a Bluray player is obviously irrelevant in your case, as you stated that your receiver has no HDMI.
     
  4. ABTForce4

    ABTForce4
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    Here's how I have done it.

    I have a Marantz SR4200 which has no component video on the back, obviously too old for HDMI as well.

    i have connected the video output from the dvd player into the tv (component), and a digital coaxial audio into the AV amp. The problem I have with this is that the sound I get is not in sync with the picture. (Like a badly dubbed Japanese film lol)

    not only this, I have connected the audio from my tv into the amp which causes the same problem, only this time it sounds like an echo since it is coming out of the tv as well as the AV amp.

    The only thing that seems to beworking ok is the Playstation 3. This is connected via HDMI to the tv, with the optical from the PS3 going to the amp. This is in sync as far as I can tell,but I only have the option to send the audio to the tv, or the amp, not both.

    My amp has no lip sync capabilities on it. What do I do other than buy a more up to date amp.

    I apologise if i have rambled a bit but I really would appreciate the help.

    Many thanks
     

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