Question AV dropout from pc to Onkyo TX-NR686

JonnyTester

Well-known Member
I haven't been using my pc much for av over the last few years, due to interference on the sub channel. I recently upgraded my speakers to full range floorstanders with pretty good extended bass, so I no longer need the sub. So this has opened up the possibility of using my pc for av stuff again, especially Bluray iso's. But after trying to set this up over the last few days it appears there is an issue with the av signal from the pc to the receiver to the tv.

I have a pretty decent pc, with an Nvidia GT 1650 Super graphics card. It runs 4k 60Hz with HDR10 natively. I was using it with my LG hdmi monitor with no problems. But when I switched the hdmi connection to my Onkyo TX-NR686 receiver, picture and sound started dropping out every few seconds. I updated the card drivers and receiver firmware, kept the tv and receiver turned off while connecting the cable, switched sources and back again, tried different cables (the original cable cost £30 from Amazon, so not a cheapo) but the problem has refused to budge. Now there has been an issue with ARC between the tv and pc, but as I didn't need the use of the smart apps on the tv, I just forgot about it. And when researching the dropout problem Onkyo is the brand name of receivers it happens with most regularly. Now I'm thinking the receiver which is at fault.

I bought the receiver in January 2019. It is 4 days out of warranty. It was also bought from a German retailer. What sort of reception am I likely to get from Onkyo if I ask them (nicely) to investigate this under warranty?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Try replacing the HDMI cable you are using between the PC and the AVR. I'd suggest you use at least a cable rated HIGH SPEED and no longer than 6m in length. If you need a longer cable then I'd suggest you look into using hybrid HDMI over fibre cabling.

HDMI signal dropouts are invariable a result of poor HDMI cables or cables that don't comply with what is ordinarilly afvised.

Note that the price od a cable is not an indication of its quality or reliability. Amazon's own Basics cables for example are both reliable and very affordable. AS already siggested, don't use long cables and try keep the cable run as short as possible.

It may also be advisable to try changing the cable from the AV receiver to the display in order to rule that out as being the issue? The same advice as previously given would apply to this cable as well.
 
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JonnyTester

Well-known Member
Try replacing the HDMI cable you are using between the PC and the AVR. I'd suggest you use at least a cable rated HIGH SPEED and no longer than 6m in length. If you need a longer cable then I'd suggest you look into using hybrid HDMI over fibre cabling.

HDMI signal dropouts are invariable a result of poor HDMI cables or cables that don't comply with what is ordinarilly afvised.

Note that the price od a cable is not an indication of its quality or reliability. Amazon's own Basics cables for example are both reliable and very affordable. AS already siggested, don't use long cables and try keep the cable run as short as possible.

It may also be advisable to try changing the cable from the AV receiver to the display in order to rule that out as being the issue? The same advice as previously given would apply to this cable as well.
While I agree that price does not a reliable cable make, I always make sure I am buying high speed cables. Hence the price I pay. And as the cables work as expected with both my Nvidia Shield and Xbox One S I can't see them as being the fault here. But on your recommendation I will try Amazon basic cables between the pc to receiver, and receiver to tv. I use 3m cables as both tv and pc are within a couple of feet of the receiver. I'll post an update when the other cables arrive.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
HIGH SPEED cables are not expensive. Smazon's own Basics cable is a HIGH SPEED cable. HIGH speeed is simply a reference to the bandwidth and this would bec18Gbps with a cable rated HIGH SPEED.

The fact a cable works with other devices is no gurantee og its reliability with others. A good cable works with whatever device you use it with while many substandard cables vary as to their reliability depending upon the device or devices being used.

If you wany a liilr bit more reassurance then you cou;d consider Monoprices PREMIUM certified cables. Despite being officially certified by HDMI org, they are still very affordable.




Note that a PREMIUM cable is no more able than a HIGH SPEED cable. THe only difference is the way in which HDMI org test them relative to UHD signals.
 

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