Audio problems, headphones stopped working.

Graf von Scyth

Novice Member
Not sure he tried it though...
I have indeed tried it, the problem with that is, because my PC does not recognise my headphones, there is nothing for me to select.
I.E I'm supposed to select headphones, but the headphones just aren't there.
MONITOR 1.JPG

This thing I have circled is the HDMI monitor that is playing my audio.
Notice the lack of anything else to select?
And yes, Show disabled and disconnected devices is enabled, as you can see.
 

jimscreechy

Active Member
Fantastic! This is the information we needed. So for what ever reason your soundcard has 'disappeared' though why need to be determined. A case for Holmes if ever there was one.

I wasn't certain from your earlier posts if your card was onboard or not, or at least if you were using an onboard card, but since pretty much all modern motherboards pretty have onboard audio capability these days I will assume it is, at least initially. (some pics would help)

Since you don't see any triangles or indication that something is not working, nor does it appear in device manager, and clearly your sound control panel doesn't show the sound device, then its either busted, become dislodged (if it is not onboard) or disabled. For it to be disabled so it doesn't show up in device manager, it would have to be done in the BIOS.

If you have done a BIOS update, maybe changed the motherboard battery, or had some comic radiation pass through the chip, it is possible this setting has changed.

You need to go into the BIOS and ensure that it is enabled. HERE is a video that gives you a basic idea of how to do this though I should point out this a fairly dated BIOS and yours may look somewhat different. Still the principle is the same.

I'm inclined to think this is where the problem is, (since determining the sound card is 'kaput' is highly undesirable) but let us know.
 

Graf von Scyth

Novice Member
Fantastic! This is the information we needed. So for what ever reason your soundcard has 'disappeared' though why need to be determined. A case for Holmes if ever there was one.

I wasn't certain from your earlier posts if your card was onboard or not, or at least if you were using an onboard card, but since pretty much all modern motherboards pretty have onboard audio capability these days I will assume it is, at least initially. (some pics would help)

Since you don't see any triangles or indication that something is not working, nor does it appear in device manager, and clearly your sound control panel doesn't show the sound device, then its either busted, become dislodged (if it is not onboard) or disabled. For it to be disabled so it doesn't show up in device manager, it would have to be done in the BIOS.

If you have done a BIOS update, maybe changed the motherboard battery, or had some comic radiation pass through the chip, it is possible this setting has changed.

You need to go into the BIOS and ensure that it is enabled. HERE is a video that gives you a basic idea of how to do this though I should point out this a fairly dated BIOS and yours may look somewhat different. Still the principle is the same.

I'm inclined to think this is where the problem is, (since determining the sound card is 'kaput' is highly undesirable) but let us know.
Alright, I went and investigated the BIOS settings and they look like this.
MONITOR 8.jpg

Now I know fvck all about what I'm looking for, but maybe you can make a little more sense of this.
 

jimscreechy

Active Member
That's ok so if you look at the second item from the bottom it says "HD Audio Controller Enabled. That is the item we are interested in, and it clearly has been Enabled, so that isn't the cause of the problem.

Hmm that isn't good and certainly leads me to believe your soundcard is no longer working. The only thing I can suggest now is maybe some pictures of inside your pc, but even so its not looking good. It certainly seems like a hardware issue and without physically being able to diagnose it I don't think there is much more I can suggest. Anyway pics if you have them, or a motherboard model no.
 

Graf von Scyth

Novice Member
That's ok so if you look at the second item from the bottom it says "HD Audio Controller Enabled. That is the item we are interested in, and it clearly has been Enabled, so that isn't the cause of the problem.

Hmm that isn't good and certainly leads me to believe your soundcard is no longer working. The only thing I can suggest now is maybe some pictures of inside your pc, but even so its not looking good. It certainly seems like a hardware issue and without physically being able to diagnose it I don't think there is much more I can suggest. Anyway pics if you have them, or a motherboard model no.
Motherboard is a Z370-A PRO by MSI
I'll go get a pic of inside my PC, but it's such a mess in there I don't think it'll really say all that much.
 

jimscreechy

Active Member
Ok given that motherboard which has a onboard sound card as most do, and all you have done is move it physically, I would suggest one of the following has happened.

1.) Some part of the hardware, be it connector, motherboard, or solder joint or cable has been damaged in the move. Rare but it can happen even when your careful.

2.) The header or sockets connected to the header cable have become damaged. I have seen a couple of these cases. With onboard audio you have the sockets mounted directly on the board PCB which you can plug into at the back of your PC, but you also have what's called a header, which is just a bunch of pins you plug a connector to, and that connector stretches via a cable or bunch of wires to front of your pc to the set of audio sockets on the front of your PC. Its just an second set of connectors so you can plug your headphones conveniently in the front (as well as the back.) Fatigue from plugging in and out can sometimes damage the front sockets which can short out the audio and stop it working or working properly. Anyway, an easy way to test this is to simply remove the header from the motherboard, then plug you headphones in the back (or see if your audio device then appears in control panel or device manager). Strictly speaking, such a fault shouldn't stop the device from being detected, but hey-ho we don't know, so you can try it and maybe you'll get lucky since at least this doesn't mean your motherboard is knackered.

3.) Lastly, you PC has something loose inside and moving it has cause some short that has killed or disabled your audio. I've only seen this in very dirty, dusty, or contaminated environments, but it is a possibility. Cleaning out your PC (blowing it with an air duster or compressor) and visually inspecting it is your best bet. Its a long shot but you have nothing to lose.

As I said before, without being able to physically inspect the host its hard to diagnose further.

Let us know.
 

Graf von Scyth

Novice Member
Ok given that motherboard which has a onboard sound card as most do, and all you have done is move it physically, I would suggest one of the following has happened.

1.) Some part of the hardware, be it connector, motherboard, or solder joint or cable has been damaged in the move. Rare but it can happen even when your careful.

2.) The header or sockets connected to the header cable have become damaged. I have seen a couple of these cases. With onboard audio you have the sockets mounted directly on the board PCB which you can plug into at the back of your PC, but you also have what's called a header, which is just a bunch of pins you plug a connector to, and that connector stretches via a cable or bunch of wires to front of your pc to the set of audio sockets on the front of your PC. Its just an second set of connectors so you can plug your headphones conveniently in the front (as well as the back.) Fatigue from plugging in and out can sometimes damage the front sockets which can short out the audio and stop it working or working properly. Anyway, an easy way to test this is to simply remove the header from the motherboard, then plug you headphones in the back (or see if your audio device then appears in control panel or device manager). Strictly speaking, such a fault shouldn't stop the device from being detected, but hey-ho we don't know, so you can try it and maybe you'll get lucky since at least this doesn't mean your motherboard is knackered.

3.) Lastly, you PC has something loose inside and moving it has cause some short that has killed or disabled your audio. I've only seen this in very dirty, dusty, or contaminated environments, but it is a possibility. Cleaning out your PC (blowing it with an air duster or compressor) and visually inspecting it is your best bet. Its a long shot but you have nothing to lose.

As I said before, without being able to physically inspect the host its hard to diagnose further.

Let us know.
MONITOR 9.jpg

I took this picture of the inside of my machine. I don't know what this can tell you, but, I thought I may as well.
What I'll probably do is I'll just call a PC repair specialist and... hope it's not too expensive.
 

jimscreechy

Active Member
Hmm I can't see to clearly from that pic but looks pretty grim inside that's for sure. I've seen worse, but it certainly needs a clean.

If your not comfortable doing it yourself I think you should get someone to do it, and since you already have a fault, I'd advise against any measures to restore function with supplementary devices till you've at least made sure there's not 'evil afoot' inside that case.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Maverick UK Premiere IMAX Review + Top Gun, Tom Cruise, Tony Scott and 4K + Movie/TV News
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom