Question Atmos modules in a room with low ceilings

Mark4444

Member
I am installing a 5.1 system into a room with a low ceiling. The pieces are:
Fronts - KEF Q750
Centre - KEF Q250c
Rears - KEF Q150
Sub - KEF Kube 10b
Receiver - Denon AVRX4700H

However, I also have 2 KEF Q50a Atmos modules. I'd like to use them, but the room has a very low ceiling (6ft 8in), which is well below what Dolby says is the minimum height for modules (they say 7.5ft - 14ft ceiling). I also notice that Dolby (and others) say that 4 modules is better, and that they must bounce off a ceiling to work properly. But I'm definitely not spending any more significant amounts of money, especially if it's for a losing cause.

So, stupid question from a person doing his very first home theatre setup. Should I...:

a) Tilt the Atmos modules forward to improve the angle of sound coming out of the module, so that it "lands" at the listening position? I've got some wedges or feet that may do the trick. Very DIY though, and seems a bit ridiculous. But it would increase the distance the sound travels coming out of the module...enough to make up for the low ceiling???

b) Sell the Atmos modules (they are still unopened), and buy some nice bipole/dipole speakers to become my new rear speakers. I like the idea of using them to improve surround sound, and I can use the Q150s elsewhere in my house. (Any recommendations for nice bipole/dipole speakers as rears would be nice too!). Or is bipole/dipole a thing of the past?...I've always found standard speakers to be a bit too direct as rears.

c) Choose a third option that I'm not considering? Again, not interested in dropping significantly more money at this point.

I'm heavily leaning towards b), but I'd like to weigh options and hear from others that aren't just trying to upsell me, hehe. Pics of what I'm proposing are attached. Thank you in advance for any advice.

atmospic1.jpg
atmospic2.jpg
 

mb3195

Distinguished Member
Personally I’d try option 1 and see what you think.

direct firing is usually used on the rear wall, but this is mainly a personal choice, like anything with audio really.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Although my ceiling hits just above the minimum height I still had to put something under the rear feet to increase the angle. Sounds much better now. I would carefully open the box and experiment with one pair initially.

Run Audyssey and set the crossover to 120hz, also increase the levels by 2dB to 3dB.
 

Mark4444

Member
Personally I’d try option 1 and see what you think.

direct firing is usually used on the rear wall, but this is mainly a personal choice, like anything with audio really.
I was hoping to not have to open the box to try it out, but you've got a point.

What's your opinion on direct firing vs. bipole/dipole as rears? Ever tried the latter? If so, was it in a large room or a small room?
 

Mark4444

Member
Although my ceiling hits just above the minimum height I still had to put something under the rear feet to increase the angle. Sounds much better now. I would carefully open the box and experiment with one pair initially.

Run Audyssey and set the crossover to 120hz, also increase the levels by 2dB to 3dB.
Would bipole/dipole speakers as rears produce a somewhat better effect than Atmos modules at this height? I like the idea of the diffused/spread out sound, but I've never tried Atmos before, so I don't know how it compares.
 

mb3195

Distinguished Member
What's your opinion on direct firing vs. bipole/dipole as rears? Ever tried the latter? If so, was it in a large room or a small room?
Relatively small room (4.6m x 3.3m), I’ve tried both triaxial (similar to tripole) and direct firing for rears. Not much in it if I’m honest but decided on direct firing in the end. They certainly didn’t sound bad in triaxial mode though.
 

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