Question Atmos Crossover setting

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by mjbtin, Dec 18, 2017.


    1. mjbtin

      mjbtin
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      There seems to be a lot confusion when it comes to setting the crossover for front overhead and rear overhead atmos speakers.If you look at the specs of alot atmos modules they are 180 -20,000hz but assume the frequency range is greater than this?
      Now if an atmos channel is supposed to be full range are the frequencies under 180hz catered for by the subwoofer?
      If you set the crossovers to say 100hz on the atmos modules I assume the frequencies between 100 and 180hz would diminish the overhead effect?

      Regards Martin
       
    2. Deleted member 598831

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      It all depends on the systems capability. Atmos is indeed a full range signal, but if using speakers that cant handle the range then it would be advisable to crossover to the subwoofer.

      Same if running a stand alone avr, and running an 80hz crossover. Its going to be too much for it to do, so let it do less and offload some of the bottom end to a subwoofer.

      Its all relative to what your system is capable of, and more importantly, what sound good to the guy that paid for it.
       
    3. mjbtin

      mjbtin
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      Dolby/avr sets atmos even a full range speaker to 180hz so there must be a good reason for this?so even if you have full range atmos speakers you would still set to 180hz and let the sub deal with the lower frequencies as you would not want the sub 180 frequencies to muddy and interfere with the frequencies above 180hz from a direct firing atmos speaker?
      At the end of the day you set up to your own ears but dolby must have done a lot of testing of atmos and there must be a valid reason for setting the atmos speakers to 180hz?

      Martin
       
    4. Deleted member 598831

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      In my current system my avr detects my atmos speakers, and sets them at 80hz, which looking at their in room response from arc they are more than capable at 80hz. I personally wouldn't want localisable bass coming from a subwoofer (I run a single), but if running duals this shouldn't be so much of an issue.

      The sub 180hz wont muddy a speakers sound, unless its not capable of reproducing it. Some avr also have universal crossovers, so 180 would be a bit of a no go.

      For instance, say atmos was only directed to channels at 120hz and above, if your speakers were being detected as crossing over at 180 its mainly due to the speaker not being able to handle the lower side, or possible room acoustics. But if a speaker is capable of 80hz by selection of the avr, then that would imply that speaker is more up to the job, even if its not required to play at 80.
       
    5. Deleted member 598831

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      All I can see on the dolby details is about atmos enabled speakers.

      Capture.JPG
       
    6. mjbtin

      mjbtin
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      Just done a bit of research and it seems if you use the add on speakers that reflect the sound off the ceiling this is the reason for 180-200hz crossover.If you use in ceiling or height speakers aimed at the mlp depending on your speakers the crossover will be lower.

      Martin
       
    7. Deleted member 598831

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      I'm guessing that its going to take quite a large driver to deflect lower frequencies that have a longer standing wave form, not to mention the impact it will have on the sound, ie the timing/response at mlp. Probably cause some cancellation as well.
       

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