Question Are you missing Dolby Vision on Sammy's TV?

bamba

Novice Member
Hey folks, just wondering if you wish you had DV in your Samsung, it seems nice to have but I am wondering if having a bright TV such as the 80T that can deal decently with HDR, than not having DV is less of a problem.
 

Magic Walrus

Active Member
No. Happy with picture I’ve got. The few HDR10+ bits of content look great, but not night and day different from the regular streamed content.
 

cuke2u

Well-known Member
What is there to miss?
 

Daveyboy1985

Active Member
I would like to have Dolby Vision as this seems to be a popular format now and is a dynamic HDR format. However, if we never get it then it’s not a huge issue. I really don’t think they will add Dolby vision all of a sudden. Does anyone else?
 
In terms of DV content on Netflix and AppleTV.... is it somehow downscaled to HDR 10+ or does it look noticeably worse? Interested how people who stream this stuff feel - shortchanged or not bothered?
 

Daveyboy1985

Active Member
In terms of DV content on Netflix and AppleTV.... is it somehow downscaled to HDR 10+ or does it look noticeably worse? Interested how people who stream this stuff feel - shortchanged or not bothered?
I believe it’s downscaled to HDR10 but not HDR10+. I watched a lot of videos on this prior to buying the tv and do not feel it a deal breaker not having it on a Q90.
from watching some of the videos online, it’s more important that the tv can handle HDR10 correctly before thinking of DV etc.
 
I believe it’s downscaled to HDR10 but not HDR10+. I watched a lot of videos on this prior to buying the tv and do not feel it a deal breaker not having it on a Q90.
from watching some of the videos online, it’s more important that the tv can handle HDR10 correctly before thinking of DV etc.
Thanks fella. Sound advice

got a link to a particularly good video?
 

anantind

Member
FOMO's got it right, I think.

Look at the actual hardware capabilities of the TVs first. If the TV has high peak brightness and good contrast, "plain old" HDR10 will look amazing. If the TV can't hit those peaks or has lackluster contrast, Dolby Vision vs HDR10+ is completely moot. Now if you're looking at two TVs with pretty much identical peak brightness and contrast, then you could argue that Dolby Vision support is an advantage for content that uses it, but then that also depends on how the content is mastered. Some Dolby Vision content is not truly HDR at all, as the creators have apparently just stuffed an SDR film into a Dolby Vision container, such as the original Star Wars trilogy and The Mandalorian on Disney Plus:

Edit: Removed FOMO video, since @Daveyboy1985 posted the same video moments before me =)
 
FOMO's got it right, I think.

Look at the actual hardware capabilities of the TVs first. If the TV has high peak brightness and good contrast, "plain old" HDR10 will look amazing. If the TV can't hit those peaks or has lackluster contrast, Dolby Vision vs HDR10+ is completely moot. Now if you're looking at two TVs with pretty much identical peak brightness and contrast, then you could argue that Dolby Vision support is an advantage for content that uses it, but then that also depends on how the content is mastered. Some Dolby Vision content is not truly HDR at all, as the creators have apparently just stuffed an SDR film into a Dolby Vision container, such as the original Star Wars trilogy and The Mandalorian on Disney Plus:

Edit: Removed FOMO video, since @Daveyboy1985 posted the same video moments before me =)
This is great. Thank you!

Just endlessly debating whether to spend an extra £300 on an OLED for my kitchen tv, or go for the Samsung 80T. Brightness in the kitchen definitely a factor (there's loads of glass) but really want to future proof for PS5 etc
 

anantind

Member
I would not recommend an OLED in a brightly lit room. I bought a Panasonic OLED for the living room on a fantastic bargain a few months ago, but I took it back because the reflections were too annoying during day time. Now if there was an OLED TV with the same kind of anti-reflective filter as Samsung uses on their top QLED models, I might reconsider. But I'm firmly decided on LCD for now. Definitely no point in spending more for perfect blacks that will be hidden behind the reflection of your windows.
 
I would not recommend an OLED in a brightly lit room. I bought a Panasonic OLED for the living room on a fantastic bargain a few months ago, but I took it back because the reflections were too annoying during day time. Now if there was an OLED TV with the same kind of anti-reflective filter as Samsung uses on their top QLED models, I might reconsider. But I'm firmly decided on LCD for now. Definitely no point in spending more for perfect blacks that will be hidden behind the reflection of your windows.
solid advice

only concern about the Samsung q80t at 49inches is they’ve not included anti glare. Very annoying!
 

lgans316

Distinguished Member
Some of the comments here are quite naive and surprising.
 

anantind

Member
Some of the comments here are quite naive and surprising.
Perhaps this part?

If the TV has high peak brightness and good contrast, "plain old" HDR10 will look amazing. If the TV can't hit those peaks or has lackluster contrast, Dolby Vision vs HDR10+ is completely moot.
Reading again what I wrote above, this came out completely wrong. The point I intended to make (but somehow messed up) is that getting a TV with a good dynamic range (ability to produce deep blacks and high peak brightness) has a much bigger impact on your viewing experience than whether it supports Dolby Vision/HDR10+ or not. From what I understand, content which is mastered for a peak brightness of 1000 nits does not need any tone mapping applied when displayed on a TV capable of both deep blacks and peak brightness of 1000 nits or higher, and thus dynamic metadata is not useful. Dynamic metadata is especially helpful if your TV is less capable, helping the TV adapt its tone mapping from scene to scene in order to make the most of the limited dynamic range that it actually has to work with, while preserving the creator's intent as much as possible. But no matter how clever the TV's tone mapping is, if the peak brightness is poor and/or the black level is too elevated, you will not get that HDR "pop" which I think people have come to expect.

With content mastered for 4000 nits, I suppose dynamic metadata would be useful on all current TVs, as no TV available today can produce that kind of brightness, but I would think still that the TV's raw specs in brightness and contrast is more important, but I may be mistaken. I am by no means an expert in any of this. I am just expressing the essence of what I have learned researching TVs lately. My understanding might be off or completely wrong in places, so I welcome any and all criticism.
 

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