Are TV prices increasing in 2022/23?

password1

Distinguished Member
I have never bought a TV and know very little about TV price trends or the latest TV technology. (Ive no idea what the difference between arc and earc is or what the difference between qled and oled is)

I have an old 40 inch LCD handed down from my parents which I use for a games console (wii), nicam stereo vcr player (using a scart lead) and blu ray player.

I've been considering a larger more energy efficient TV.

Is now a good time or wait til black friday?

Are TVs like computers (gets cheaper for the spec) or like hifi separates (getting more expensive) in terms of price trends?

I remember a 4k 40 inch TV cost £1000+ not many ay years ago... this makes me think prices are going down when new technologies come out.
 

dts

Distinguished Member
Yes there will be price increases we will see big increases in everything we buy unfortunately...
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
A larger TV will typically use more energy, and while LCD energy consumption has dropped slightly over the decades it's not been dramatic.

Generally TV ranges are updated yearly, with the models launching at a high price and coming down over the year until they're cleared out to make room for the next year's revisions.

The year mostly runs spring to spring, so the Christmas discounts do tend to be the lowest prices outside of clearance deals.

Larger TVs have gotten cheaper over time as LCDs have been made in larger and larger plates (which means there's less wastage when you cut it down to TV-sized pieces). In the last couple of years we've seen Gen 10.5 fabs come online which have substantially reduced the price of 65" and 75" models.
 
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password1

Distinguished Member
My current TV consumes 200watts (197 watts to be exact).

Would a modern mid range 50 or 55 or 60 inch consume a lot more?
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Average power consumption of a large (at the time) CCFL LCD was closer to 100W IIRC so it sounds like yours might be fairly inefficient - assuming that's measured power rather than listed peak power.

A new 55" TV would run to 50-100W depending on brightness.
 

password1

Distinguished Member
Mine is a Sony, my parents bought it brand new on special offer, i think it was £800 or £900 at the time and was the second biggest TV available on the market. It replaced an expensive 29 inch Sony Trinitron. The biggest was 46 inch for a lot more money. There weren't many flat screen TVs available at the time.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
The time to buy a new TV is either in the next 2-3 months so as to get the cheapest price on a 2021 model TV or wait until at least Black Friday for a 2022 model, the 2022 model won't get to be at its max discount though until about 14-16 months from now.
 

password1

Distinguished Member
So the maximum discount is when a newer model is released? and prices always go down when a newer model is released, rather than the 'old' model keeping the same price whilst a new model increases in price?

What's the life cycle of a TV model. Is it replaced every 1, 2, 4 years?

I know with speakers its typically every 4 to 6 years a new model comes out.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
New TVs are shown at the consumer electronic show (CES) in Las Vegas every year and launched into the UK 2-4 months later.

The TV you buy in 2021 is superceded by a newer model in 2022. Usually, unless there's a huge jump in technology, differences and advances are, at best, minimal and quite often a step backwards but these major advances are only at the top end of TVs.
 

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