Aquarium and Tropical/Marine Fish chit chat thread

ruffage

Distinguished Member
Anybody recommend a decent algae scraper and a submersible water thermometer.

Any thermometer i buy only seems to last a few months before either digits start to die or it misreads. :(
I couldn’t find any that didn’t have some bad reviews, so have made do with a digital one from Amazon and also the usual floaty analogue type.

Picked up some Danios and and an Armoured Shrimp today. Think my tank’s fairly full now, not that it seems so from the pic:

173D2CAD-0322-4A78-9FA4-650214D97A5B.jpeg
F70557A5-668E-4E4C-A530-AC98266EEB0B.jpeg
 

Garrett

Moderator
Dad holding a screwfix leaflet ask me if I know anything about OB1. Replies yes character in Star Wars played by Alec Guinness. :laugh:
Looks it looks like some very strong sealant and wondering if anyone knows if its aquarium safe.
Had a couple of times when my 50 gallon tank brace across the top middle started coming away from the front pain and the glass started to bow and had to drain some of the water and clamp and re-seal with aquarium sealant which on the first go after about a year came unstuck. Re done it and used the superglue and baking soda trick passed onto me by Toko.
So if this is safe for aquarium be nice to know next time(if it goes).
 

gibbsy

Moderator

shango

Member
There ok if you don't lick, swallow them which is the dangerous bit which would be stupid to do and if they touch a cut would make you feel unwell.
The most poisonous of the dart frogs I believe is the Golden Dart Frog which natives tip there arrows in.
I use to have a pair of golden darts. They are indeed the most poisonous frog, actually one of most poisonous things on the planet. You can lick them all you want though if they are not wild or not been in the wild for a period of time. Poision is generated from their natural diet which they dont get in captivity.
Having said that they really are for looking at and not licking.
 

wormvortex

Distinguished Member
I had black hair algae once. Used Easylife Algexit and it worked miracles. You need to work out what caused your algae bloom though or it will just keep coming back
 

ruffage

Distinguished Member
I had black hair algae once. Used Easylife Algexit and it worked miracles. You need to work out what caused your algae bloom though or it will just keep coming back
Not sure on the cause atm. All water tests yesterday came back fine apart from Ammonia at 0.25. No direct windows, in the far corner from a shady window tbh. Might just be down to too much LED lights at around 8 hours a day.
 

wormvortex

Distinguished Member
Could be too much light and not enough nutrients in the water or not enough CO2 or poor water circulation. 8 hours isn't an excessive amount of time for the lights to be on unless the lights are too bright for the aquarium.

Mine was my lights. I had LED lights too and they were too bright for the size of the tank. I ended up putting them on for only 5 hours a day and then a lower powered T8 tube the the tank originally came with for the rest of the time so I could still actually enjoy the tank and see it.

I now have the tank lit for 12hours a day and only a tiny bit of algae which the shrimp take care of.
 

BT Bob

Distinguished Member
I had black hair algae once. Used Easylife Algexit and it worked miracles.
I have that atm, I've tried hydrogen peroxide with mixed results.
I'll give this a go.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Aquarium into lockdown to try and combat the hair algae:


75D9B725-FEA2-429A-81E3-0DC0A6F6BD6D.jpeg


View attachment 1281381
Green hair algae is usually a light and nutrient problem. Having your lights on too long and there being a nutrient deficiency in the tank will cause the algae. The grass needs to be stimulated and outgun the algae, if your plant feed isn't enough the algae will out compete the plants and grow faster.

I'd rather have green algae than the dreaded black beard algae, the scurge of planted discus aquariums.
 

ruffage

Distinguished Member
Green hair algae is usually a light and nutrient problem. Having your lights on too long and there being a nutrient deficiency in the tank will cause the algae. The grass needs to be stimulated and outgun the algae, if your plant feed isn't enough the algae will out compete the plants and grow faster.

I'd rather have green algae than the dreaded black beard algae, the scurge of planted discus aquariums.
Reckon I need to add more plant nutrients then. The LED strips are the ones that came with the Jewel 240, so would hope they’re right for the job. It’s only the grass in the background that grows too well. Not sure I like it anyway. The small grass in the foreground hardly grows at all:

D9ADF722-6833-4AE8-A8CE-72906A92363C.jpeg
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Reckon I need to add more plant nutrients then. The LED strips are the ones that came with the Jewel 240, so would hope they’re right for the job. It’s only the grass in the background that grows too well. Not sure I like it anyway. The small grass in the foreground hardly grows at all:

View attachment 1281742
I've got the boss looking over my shoulder making sure I give you some good advice. It looks as though you don't have injected CO2 in the tank so are you giving liquid CO2 such as Flourish Excel which is also good for tackling algae.

You have a lot of plant feed substrate but not many plants. You need a lot more so that the nutrients in the water are all taken up by the plants which will deprive the algae of those nutrients. She suggests you plant some fast growing stem plants such as Cardamine Iyrata and Hygrophila Siamensis 53B and have some floating plants as well which are excellent at taking nutrients out of the water and will give some shade from the lights.

You need to cut down on your hours of lighting especially if the light is close to the water and is at 100% for every hour that it's on. Do a twice weekly 70% change of water for at least three weeks.

Then you can consider the cleaning crew. Nerite snails, Otto catfish and Amano shrimp. The Ottos love green hair algae. The Amano are also very good for taking out any uneaten fish food and will also eat the fish poo. The Nerites will help with any algae on stones and glass.
 

ruffage

Distinguished Member
I've got the boss looking over my shoulder making sure I give you some good advice. It looks as though you don't have injected CO2 in the tank so are you giving liquid CO2 such as Flourish Excel which is also good for tackling algae.

You have a lot of plant feed substrate but not many plants. You need a lot more so that the nutrients in the water are all taken up by the plants which will deprive the algae of those nutrients. She suggests you plant some fast growing stem plants such as Cardamine Iyrata and Hygrophila Siamensis 53B and have some floating plants as well which are excellent at taking nutrients out of the water and will give some shade from the lights.

You need to cut down on your hours of lighting especially if the light is close to the water and is at 100% for every hour that it's on. Do a twice weekly 70% change of water for at least three weeks.

Then you can consider the cleaning crew. Nerite snails, Otto catfish and Amano shrimp. The Ottos love green hair algae. The Amano are also very good for taking out any uneaten fish food and will also eat the fish poo. The Nerites will help with any algae on stones and glass.
Very helpful, thanks. There's no CO2 currently, and I've just this second ordered some Flourish Excel, and also some TNC Lite. The nitrate reading on Sunday was 15, and as I'm in a hard water area I thought it best not to add any more nitrate.

As for algae livestock I only have 1 Nerite snail (female), 2 Ottos, 2 albino Corys, 1 Bristlenosed Pleco, and a Khuli loach somewhere. There's an armoured shrimp (which was way too expensive) lurking in the background but that's on the catfish food.

I was going to get some more Nerites and some Amanos when the tank's calmed down again. Do you recommend anywhere online to purchase please, considering the current lockdown?
 

gibbsy

Moderator
The nitrate reading on Sunday was 15
That's too high and suggest you are having ammonia spikes in the cycle. Algae loves nitrate. This makes the big water changes much more important as you need to get that level down. Be careful of your feeding regime for the fish as uneaten food is one of the biggest causes of high nitrate readings. Ideally you should be looking for zero ammonia and nitrite with nitrate in single figures.
 

ruffage

Distinguished Member
That's too high and suggest you are having ammonia spikes in the cycle. Algae loves nitrate. This makes the big water changes much more important as you need to get that level down. Be careful of your feeding regime for the fish as uneaten food is one of the biggest causes of high nitrate readings. Ideally you should be looking for zero ammonia and nitrite with nitrate in single figures.
Yep, Ammonia was at 0.25. Here are the other readings. Sadly I record it all:

PH 7.0 - 6.8 OK
High Range PH 7.4 OK
Ammonia 0.25 BAD, should be 0.0
Nitrite 0
Nitrate 15

I reckon the algae increased when I started adding the additional catfish food twice a week, mainly for the armoured shrimp. Regardless, nothing's getting fed during the 3 day blackout.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Yep, Ammonia was at 0.25. Here are the other readings. Sadly I record it all:

PH 7.0 - 6.8 OK
High Range PH 7.4 OK
Ammonia 0.25 BAD, should be 0.0
Nitrite 0
Nitrate 15

I reckon the algae increased when I started adding the additional catfish food twice a week, mainly for the armoured shrimp. Regardless, nothing's getting fed during the 3 day blackout.
PH as expected in a hard water area showing almost neutral. How old is the tank as the substrate itself can produce ammonia and adding fish before it's properly cycled can lead to some, but not catastrophic problem. Injected CO2 will bring the PH into the acidic range which most plants prefer.

I forgot to answer your questions about getting shrimp, nobody is posting them at the moment and most Maidenhead Aquatics are open only for good and medicine supplies. When things get back to normal then take a look at ProShrimp. Good for most things including live shrimp and plants.

 

ruffage

Distinguished Member
PH as expected in a hard water area showing almost neutral. How old is the tank as the substrate itself can produce ammonia and adding fish before it's properly cycled can lead to some, but not catastrophic problem. Injected CO2 will bring the PH into the acidic range which most plants prefer.

I forgot to answer your questions about getting shrimp, nobody is posting them at the moment and most Maidenhead Aquatics are open only for good and medicine supplies. When things get back to normal then take a look at ProShrimp. Good for most things including live shrimp and plants.

I would hope it's fully cycled, as it was set up in Jan, with loads of water changes since then:

Thanks for all your advice. I'll take the cover off on Thurs and hopefully everything will still be alive, apart from the algae.
 

wormvortex

Distinguished Member
Nitrates of 15 depending on where you live could be all from the tap water if you are not treating it to remove nitrates.

My tap water comes in at over 22
 
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gibbsy

Moderator
Here's a pic of the wife lock down project. Easy enough to get plants online but with all shops shut down it's difficult to know when we'll be able to put some fish in. Don't want to transfer any small fish over from the discus tank as they all need a mature tank.
170645968.mkWQs2um.jpg
 

LexDiamond

Active Member
Silly question but can I put a broken tank in a wheelie bin? I was aiming for a riverbed biotope to look like tree roots in a 64 litre but was way over ambitious and have cracked the tank.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Silly question but can I put a broken tank in a wheelie bin? I was aiming for a riverbed biotope to look like tree roots in a 64 litre but was way over ambitious and have cracked the tank.
It's glass. Take to the recycling centre.
 

ruffage

Distinguished Member
So I bought 7 Amano Shrimp last week, and as I have a Juwel tank with a built in filter/heater housing, they've all disappeared into that. They're only small at 1 inch long so can fit through the slots.

Question is, is there some go to mesh or grill on the market I can put in the filter casing to stop the shrimp getting back in? They're due an eviction at the next water change.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
So I bought 7 Amano Shrimp last week, and as I have a Juwel tank with a built in filter/heater housing, they've all disappeared into that. They're only small at 1 inch long so can fit through the slots.

Question is, is there some go to mesh or grill on the market I can put in the filter casing to stop the shrimp getting back in? They're due an eviction at the next water change.
Had that problem with a skimmer. Buy a shower body puff mesh and cover the inlets. Will not effect the flow.
 

ruffage

Distinguished Member
Had that problem with a skimmer. Buy a shower body puff mesh and cover the inlets. Will not effect the flow.
Thanks. I’ll ask the missus to get one from the supermarket on the next trip. I think they can only get in the top due to the foam and stuff in the bag further down, so I assume you mean to just shove the puff thing in whole, rather than use it as an internal liner?

This is the type of thing the buggers now call home: Juwel Bioflow 3.0 Complete Filter System 600l/h - Specialist Suppliers of Aquariums & Vivariums
 

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