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Apart from Sharp's 45" lcd, are there any other 1080p screens on the horizon..

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs Forum' started by Rob20, Feb 13, 2005.

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  1. Rob20

    Rob20
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    ...coming out in the UK that is. Or any other type of flat screen for that matter.
     
  2. Rob1698

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    I don't think the sharp does 1080p. It is 1080i isn't it?
     
  3. ianh64

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    I can't believe that it can't do 1080p. As was originally posted, 1280x1024 does indeed appear to be the maximum progressive resolution. Presumably there is no way that a PC could do 1080i ?
     
  4. Rob1698

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    1080p is quite a high video bandwidth. I think it would even require dual-link DVI.

    I am driving my Philips 32PF9986 in 1080i from a PC, over a VGA cable. I have not yet tried DVI.
    In the specs of the TV this is not listed as possible, PC and HD resolutions are listed separately and the HD resolutions are specified for component video.
    But it turns out to work. The "info" popup neatly shows it as 1080i.
    (it can also show 720p, VGA and XVGA modes)
     
  5. ianh64

    ianh64
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    Well in that case it will do 1080i in dot for dot mode so all is not totally lost.

    1080p doesn't require dual link though. For example, only the 30" Apple monitor at 2560 x 1600 requires dual link. The 23" will quite happily support 1920 x 1200 with a single link.

    -Ian
     
  6. PDM

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    I believe the Samsung "LW-46G15W" is capable of 1,920 x 1,080p.
     
  7. chambeaj

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    EXPANDED JVC HIGH DEFINITION LCD TV LINE INCLUDES SIX SCREEN SIZES

    New line includes models ranging from 17 to 40 inches; 1080p model for fall.

    In the fall, JVC will launch a 40-inch 1080p LCD television, the LT-40FH96, with ATSC/CableCARDTM, dual HDMI inputs, dual IEEE 1394 inputs, memory card slot that can accept the Microdrive™ used in JVC’s Everio camcorders, and universal fully illuminated remote.

    http://www.jvc.com/press/press.jsp?item=446


    LC-45GD6U | Televisions

    Sharp’s LC-45GD6U AQUOS™ is a breathtaking 45" widescreen HDTV1 that can easily enhance the decor of any family room, living room or den. The LC-45GD6U is the largest LC-TV on the market today (along with other 45" Sharp models), and it displays all content in full HD spec (1080p) resolution, the highest of the DTV resolutions. With a 16:9 aspect ratio, unbeatable resolution of 1920 x 1080 and vivid color purity, it is a next-generation TV to carry you into the high-definition future.

    http://www.sharpusa.com/products/ModelLanding/0,1058,1426,00.html
     
  8. Rob20

    Rob20
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    Here's some info on that model:

    You might notice the set is capable of 1080p. I can't see why a tv set with a 1920 * 1080 screen resolution would be unable to display a progressive 1080 signal!? Also, as far as I was aware, both HDMI and DVI were capable of handling a 1080p signal. Especially when it's likely films will be encoded 1080p24 on both Blu-Ray and HD-DVD formats.
     
  9. hornydragon

    hornydragon
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  10. Rob20

    Rob20
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    Was the double negative intentional. That reads as if you believe that the screen must be able to do 1080p. Who told you that 1280 by 1024 was the max progressive resolution, and I'm not sure about the relavance of whether a pc could do 1080i. The thread was asking whether there were any screens that could display a 1080p signal on a per pixel basis. :confused:

    I read on the net somewhere that ESPN were preparing to broadcast in 1080p at some point. Maybe one off events like the Superbowl or something, (assuming that they had the rights!?).
     
  11. Rob20

    Rob20
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    I notice from that link the the USA version has HDMI as well as a DVI connection. I wonder why they removed the HDMI connection for the Uk's version? Especially on a tv that retails for £6,500. :confused:
     
  12. Rob20

    Rob20
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    Nice. I wonder how much that would cost? When you consider a 3 chip 1280 by 720p is £25k. A 3 chip with 1920 by 1080p must be significantly more expensive?

    Am I right to assume that there aren't any 1080p projectors on the UK market yet. Everything that I have seen reviewed in mags/on the net etc seems to be 720p max. I always assumed that for £25k you'd definitely get a 1080p display. :confused:
     
  13. hornydragon

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    you can get them in UK even the 4000:3000 RES, only 4:3 but a cool £1,000,000.00 and £50,000.00 for the lens with 125 degree veiwing angle...........(government and military Apps normally)
     
  14. Mark Grant

    Mark Grant
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    A quick google search brings this :
    http://www.ivojo.co.uk/jvc-dla-hd2k.htm

    So about £1315 inc VAT for the projector,

    or the projector with scaler http://www.ivojo.co.uk/jvc-dla-hd2k-sys.htm
    for £15766 inc VAT at todays prices.

    I want one :D


    Mark.
     
  15. NicolasB

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    The Sharp LC45GD1E definitely can display 1080p. You don't actually need much more bandwidth to display 1920x1080 than you do to display 1600x1200 - a well-designed DVI-I graphics card can output this, you wouldn't need dual-link DVI.

    Usefully it's also one of the few screens to be able to accept 720p or 1080i at 50Hz rather than 60 and with HDCP encryption too - so it will be compatible with Sky HD.
     
  16. Ultim8Fury

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    You will need a GOOD graphics card to do 1080p ( over DVI ). Unfortunately the majority of Nvidia cards use the internal TMDS capabilities of the NV** chip which can only just do 1600x1200. This means that it is barely capable of 1080i let alone 1080p. I don't know the situation with ATI based cards as I'm a linux person and ATI is a bad idea under linux.

    There is a fairly good article on Toms hardware with regard to DVI compliance testing which covers the essentials.
     
  17. LcdGuru

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    1920 x 1080 x 50Hz + 1% blanking = 105 MHz
    1600 x 1200 x 60Hz + 1% blanking= 117 MHz

    So 1080p @ 50Hz runs slower than UXGA from a PC - so it should be no problem.
     
  18. Rob1698

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    The dotclock for 1080i is 74.25 MHz (same for 50Hz and 60Hz)
    For 1080p it is 148.5 MHz.

    These are from the SMPTE specs.
     
  19. hornydragon

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    they are chuffin fantastic! but it means that 1920x1080 chips are available I think only D-ILA (LCOS) at the moment which is a superb technology all the performance of DLP but no wheel!!!!!!
     
  20. ianh64

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    Erm, probably not. What I was meaning to say, if the original did not come across like that was, "I cannot believe that Sharp have omitted 1080p on this model". As for the maximum progressive resolution, it is stated in the manual. Obviously manuals can be wrong, but I would have thouight that Sharp would have been singing from the housetops if it would actually do it. The relevance of a PC doing 1080i was that at least you could feed 1080i to it from a PC - the OP wants to use the screen as a PC display - maybe this is mentioned in another thread.


    Where is it definately stated that it will do 1080p. Its not mentioned as a supported resolution in the manual.

    Actually quite a few LCD screens handle that at 50Hz. Just not many handle 1:1 or native at 50Hz.


    -Ian
     
  21. jgrg

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    Except that the slowest sync that many video cards can emit and screens lock onto is 60Hz.

    Actually for 1080p you only need 25Hz (or 30Hz from NTSC, or 24Hz from film) because that is the frame rate of the source. (2 fields in 1080i arrive every 1/50th of a second to make 1 frame every 1/25th of a second.) But that would suck as a computer display.

    James
     
  22. NicolasB

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    Well, for one, in this email which I received from Sharp. Extract follows.



    Given that LCD displays are inherently progressive and that the LC45GD1E has a pixel resolution of 1920x1080 it would be pretty weird if it didn't do 1080p....


     
  23. Rob20

    Rob20
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    Ok, infact that's eaxctly how it reads. It was a double negative, but it was used correctly. I apologise as occasionally people include a double negative in an attempt to stregthen their point. I thought you may have been saying you didn't think 1080p would be included. Right, now that's cleared up, as for the Sharp 45" doing 1080p, it's claimed on the Sharp.com site. Here's an excert:

    'Sharp’s LC-45GD6U AQUOS™ is a breathtaking 45" widescreen HDTV1 that can easily enhance the decor of any family room, living room or den. The LC-45GD6U is the largest LC-TV on the market today (along with other 45" Sharp models), and it displays all content in full HD spec (1080p) resolution, the highest of the DTV resolutions. With a 16:9 aspect ratio, unbeatable resolution of 1920 x 1080 and vivid color purity, it is a next-generation TV to carry you into the high-definition future'.

    Lastly, re-reading my response to your first post I thought I came accross a bit abrupt/rude. So sorry for that, not intending to offend. just have a tendancy to type what I'm thinking.
     
  24. ianh64

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    I urge caution on the 1080p compatibility. The information supplied by Sharp contradicts the manual and the marketing blurb "...and it displays all content in full HD spec (1080p) resolution,..." can just as easily read "all content is converted to 1080p resolution" which is not the same as saying that it will accept 1080p.

    With regard to the manual, the PC compatibility tables (pg 79) does not list 1080p nor 1080i strangely, so this may be an omission. Also the allowable AV inputs are not listed, but by inference 1080i is accepted by the statement on pg 69 about AV dot for dot mode ~ "Displays an image with the same number of pixels on the screen (only when receiving 1080i signal)." and the note ~ "In the case where the signal received is 1080i (when receiving HDTV broadcasts from an external source), mode selections will not alternate as shown and some modes may not be displayed.". Surely, if 1080p was acceptable would it not be mentioned in these statement?

    I never believe what is written until I try it for myself especially if the source is a review or someone on customer service.

    -Ian
     
  25. Ultim8Fury

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    Using the "PC Digital" or "PC Analogue" inputs then you can't get 1080i or p into the display. However its not hard to set up the PC to output ATSC standard 1080i, which the display accepts as either AV analogue or AV digital. Failing that the more dangerous route is to drive the display directly without mediabox intervention. This is not recommended as you will be removing a layer of protection from the screen from bad resolutions. Also it stops the remote control working.
     
  26. Rob20

    Rob20
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    I'm confused why Sharp would convert everything to 1080p, but not be able to accept a 1080p signal. Just isn't logical. Still, only Sharp can clear up the confusion.
     
  27. richjthorpe

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    Could be way off here, but I thought it was the DVI/HDMI connection that had a limitation of 1080i. So if this is the case, the TV would have to do the i-p processing.

    Edit - Forget I said that, just found that HDMI can send up to 5Gb per second !

    Richie.
     
  28. Rob20

    Rob20
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    Is that 5 Gigabits, or 5 Gigabytes? still, more enough whichever.
     
  29. chambeaj

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    Gb = Gigabits
    GB = Gigabytes
     
  30. ariomanus

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    Hello,

    I'm also interested in a big (>=42") LCD-TV, which is able to display 1080p, so I'm reading already for a while this forum, a German and an US forum about LCD and Plasma TVs.

    This is a summary of the information I've found:

    1. The US Model Sharp LC-45GD6U is not able to display 1080p, the Sharp LC-45GX6U (this is the US-Version with external AVC-Box) is officially only supporting 1080i and some PC resolutions which are much lower than 1920x1080. The AVC Box is scaling these resolutions to 1080p (60Hz) and is sending them through 3 cables to the 45" display itself. One of these cables has DVI-sockets on both sides.

    In the US there are some Sharp customers who are feeding the Sharp LC-45GX6U display directly (not through the AVC box) with 1080p (60Hz), f.e. from a HTPC or an external scaler. But this is not supported by Sharp!!! More details on this, see a very, very long post in the US forum with a similar url like this forum here. I'm not sure whether I'm allowed to post a link here.
    The AVC box must always be connected with the other 2 cables to the display. They use a Gefen DVI switch to switch between the AVC box and the 1080p source. More details see the US forum. It seems to work fine in the US, but don't forget if something goes wrong this is not supported by Sharp so it's at your own risk if something is damaged.

    For me it looks like the Sharp has a good display but the deinterlacer in the AVC box seems to be bad. F.e. I've seem in a German shop that vertical lines from a interlaced source (Denon DVD player with 1080i output or from the DVB-T receiver in the AVC box) never seem to be good.

    For me (and for some others I think) it would be very interesting whether someone has tried to feed the European LC-45GD1E directly at the display with 1080p 50Hz or 60Hz.
    Is it working at all? Is it only working with 1080p 50Hz or 60Hz or both?
    If this works it would be possible to get a much better picture with a HTPC or an external scaler/deinterlacer.

    2. The 46" Samsung LCD-TV supports officially 1080p 60Hz, but according to US customers the picture quality of the Sharp is much better.

    3. 1080p 50 Hz or 1080p 60 Hz is not a problem for DVI cables.

    I'm not a native English speaker, so I'm sorry if there are some errors in my post.

    Regards
    Ariomanus
     

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