Apart from Sharp's 45" lcd, are there any other 1080p screens on the horizon..

R

Rob1698

Guest
Rob20 said:
...coming out in the UK that is. Or any other type of flat screen for that matter.

I don't think the sharp does 1080p. It is 1080i isn't it?
 

ianh64

Active Member
I can't believe that it can't do 1080p. As was originally posted, 1280x1024 does indeed appear to be the maximum progressive resolution. Presumably there is no way that a PC could do 1080i ?
 
R

Rob1698

Guest
ianh64 said:
I can't believe that it can't do 1080p. As was originally posted, 1280x1024 does indeed appear to be the maximum progressive resolution. Presumably there is no way that a PC could do 1080i ?

1080p is quite a high video bandwidth. I think it would even require dual-link DVI.

I am driving my Philips 32PF9986 in 1080i from a PC, over a VGA cable. I have not yet tried DVI.
In the specs of the TV this is not listed as possible, PC and HD resolutions are listed separately and the HD resolutions are specified for component video.
But it turns out to work. The "info" popup neatly shows it as 1080i.
(it can also show 720p, VGA and XVGA modes)
 

ianh64

Active Member
Well in that case it will do 1080i in dot for dot mode so all is not totally lost.

1080p doesn't require dual link though. For example, only the 30" Apple monitor at 2560 x 1600 requires dual link. The 23" will quite happily support 1920 x 1200 with a single link.

-Ian
 
P

PDM

Guest
I believe the Samsung "LW-46G15W" is capable of 1,920 x 1,080p.
 

chambeaj

Well-known Member
EXPANDED JVC HIGH DEFINITION LCD TV LINE INCLUDES SIX SCREEN SIZES

New line includes models ranging from 17 to 40 inches; 1080p model for fall.

In the fall, JVC will launch a 40-inch 1080p LCD television, the LT-40FH96, with ATSC/CableCARDTM, dual HDMI inputs, dual IEEE 1394 inputs, memory card slot that can accept the Microdrive™ used in JVC’s Everio camcorders, and universal fully illuminated remote.

http://www.jvc.com/press/press.jsp?item=446


LC-45GD6U | Televisions

Sharp’s LC-45GD6U AQUOS™ is a breathtaking 45" widescreen HDTV1 that can easily enhance the decor of any family room, living room or den. The LC-45GD6U is the largest LC-TV on the market today (along with other 45" Sharp models), and it displays all content in full HD spec (1080p) resolution, the highest of the DTV resolutions. With a 16:9 aspect ratio, unbeatable resolution of 1920 x 1080 and vivid color purity, it is a next-generation TV to carry you into the high-definition future.

http://www.sharpusa.com/products/ModelLanding/0,1058,1426,00.html
 

Rob20

Well-known Member
PDM said:
I believe the Samsung "LW-46G15W" is capable of 1,920 x 1,080p.

Here's some info on that model:

With two built-in TV tuners, the Samsung LW46G15W can receive TV signals directly without the need for additional set-top boxes or video equipment. The 46-inch model provides resolution as high as 1920 * 1080, brightness of 500cd/m² and a contrast ratio of 800:1. The TV supports a 170˚ / 170˚ (vertical / horizontal) viewing angle.

The new 46” LCD TV is compatible with 1080i, 720p and 1080p standards together with 1080 progressive screening, offering the best display performance. The new 46” LCD TV also has DVI input to support all kinds of high quality digital images, providing greater multi-media choice and entertainment for users.

The LW46G15W employs Samsung’s proprietary Digital Natural Image engine (DNIe) a state-of-the-art image enhancement technology that ensures the highest quality image, and the newest technology for the reproduction of the optical picture, “12C”. The 12C technology ensures dynamically enhanced contrast in perfect accordance with the contrast distribution of the input signal and automatically generates the optical picture by controlling the image to match the surroundings, delivering the clearest and most natural image quality to users.

You might notice the set is capable of 1080p. I can't see why a tv set with a 1920 * 1080 screen resolution would be unable to display a progressive 1080 signal!? Also, as far as I was aware, both HDMI and DVI were capable of handling a 1080p signal. Especially when it's likely films will be encoded 1080p24 on both Blu-Ray and HD-DVD formats.
 

Rob20

Well-known Member
ianh64 said:
I can't believe that it can't do 1080p. As was originally posted, 1280x1024 does indeed appear to be the maximum progressive resolution. Presumably there is no way that a PC could do 1080i ?

Was the double negative intentional. That reads as if you believe that the screen must be able to do 1080p. Who told you that 1280 by 1024 was the max progressive resolution, and I'm not sure about the relavance of whether a pc could do 1080i. The thread was asking whether there were any screens that could display a 1080p signal on a per pixel basis. :confused:

I read on the net somewhere that ESPN were preparing to broadcast in 1080p at some point. Maybe one off events like the Superbowl or something, (assuming that they had the rights!?).
 

Rob20

Well-known Member
chambeaj said:
LC-45GD6U | Televisions

Sharp’s LC-45GD6U AQUOS™ is a breathtaking 45" widescreen HDTV1 that can easily enhance the decor of any family room, living room or den. The LC-45GD6U is the largest LC-TV on the market today (along with other 45" Sharp models), and it displays all content in full HD spec (1080p) resolution, the highest of the DTV resolutions. With a 16:9 aspect ratio, unbeatable resolution of 1920 x 1080 and vivid color purity, it is a next-generation TV to carry you into the high-definition future.

http://www.sharpusa.com/products/ModelLanding/0,1058,1426,00.html

I notice from that link the the USA version has HDMI as well as a DVI connection. I wonder why they removed the HDMI connection for the Uk's version? Especially on a tv that retails for £6,500. :confused:
 

Rob20

Well-known Member
hornydragon said:

Nice. I wonder how much that would cost? When you consider a 3 chip 1280 by 720p is £25k. A 3 chip with 1920 by 1080p must be significantly more expensive?

Am I right to assume that there aren't any 1080p projectors on the UK market yet. Everything that I have seen reviewed in mags/on the net etc seems to be 720p max. I always assumed that for £25k you'd definitely get a 1080p display. :confused:
 

hornydragon

Distinguished Member
you can get them in UK even the 4000:3000 RES, only 4:3 but a cool £1,000,000.00 and £50,000.00 for the lens with 125 degree veiwing angle...........(government and military Apps normally)
 

NicolasB

Distinguished Member
I don't think the sharp does 1080p. It is 1080i isn't it?
The Sharp LC45GD1E definitely can display 1080p. You don't actually need much more bandwidth to display 1920x1080 than you do to display 1600x1200 - a well-designed DVI-I graphics card can output this, you wouldn't need dual-link DVI.

Usefully it's also one of the few screens to be able to accept 720p or 1080i at 50Hz rather than 60 and with HDCP encryption too - so it will be compatible with Sky HD.
 
U

Ultim8Fury

Guest
You will need a GOOD graphics card to do 1080p ( over DVI ). Unfortunately the majority of Nvidia cards use the internal TMDS capabilities of the NV** chip which can only just do 1600x1200. This means that it is barely capable of 1080i let alone 1080p. I don't know the situation with ATI based cards as I'm a linux person and ATI is a bad idea under linux.

There is a fairly good article on Toms hardware with regard to DVI compliance testing which covers the essentials.
 
L

LcdGuru

Guest
1920 x 1080 x 50Hz + 1% blanking = 105 MHz
1600 x 1200 x 60Hz + 1% blanking= 117 MHz

So 1080p @ 50Hz runs slower than UXGA from a PC - so it should be no problem.
 
R

Rob1698

Guest
LcdGuru said:
1920 x 1080 x 50Hz + 1% blanking = 105 MHz
1600 x 1200 x 60Hz + 1% blanking= 117 MHz

So 1080p @ 50Hz runs slower than UXGA from a PC - so it should be no problem.

The dotclock for 1080i is 74.25 MHz (same for 50Hz and 60Hz)
For 1080p it is 148.5 MHz.

These are from the SMPTE specs.
 

hornydragon

Distinguished Member

ianh64

Active Member
Rob20 said:
Was the double negative intentional. That reads as if you believe that the screen must be able to do 1080p. Who told you that 1280 by 1024 was the max progressive resolution, and I'm not sure about the relavance of whether a pc could do 1080i. The thread was asking whether there were any screens that could display a 1080p signal on a per pixel basis.
Erm, probably not. What I was meaning to say, if the original did not come across like that was, "I cannot believe that Sharp have omitted 1080p on this model". As for the maximum progressive resolution, it is stated in the manual. Obviously manuals can be wrong, but I would have thouight that Sharp would have been singing from the housetops if it would actually do it. The relevance of a PC doing 1080i was that at least you could feed 1080i to it from a PC - the OP wants to use the screen as a PC display - maybe this is mentioned in another thread.


NicolasB said:
The Sharp LC45GD1E definitely can display 1080p. You don't actually need much more bandwidth to display 1920x1080 than you do to display 1600x1200 - a well-designed DVI-I graphics card can output this, you wouldn't need dual-link DVI.

Usefully it's also one of the few screens to be able to accept 720p or 1080i at 50Hz rather than 60 and with HDCP encryption too - so it will be compatible with Sky HD.
Where is it definately stated that it will do 1080p. Its not mentioned as a supported resolution in the manual.

Actually quite a few LCD screens handle that at 50Hz. Just not many handle 1:1 or native at 50Hz.


-Ian
 

jgrg

Active Member
LcdGuru said:
1920 x 1080 x 50Hz + 1% blanking = 105 MHz
1600 x 1200 x 60Hz + 1% blanking= 117 MHz

So 1080p @ 50Hz runs slower than UXGA from a PC - so it should be no problem.

Except that the slowest sync that many video cards can emit and screens lock onto is 60Hz.

Actually for 1080p you only need 25Hz (or 30Hz from NTSC, or 24Hz from film) because that is the frame rate of the source. (2 fields in 1080i arrive every 1/50th of a second to make 1 frame every 1/25th of a second.) But that would suck as a computer display.

James
 

NicolasB

Distinguished Member
ianh64 said:
Where is it definately stated that it will do 1080p. Its not mentioned as a supported resolution in the manual.

Well, for one, in this email which I received from Sharp. Extract follows.


Me:

Do you know if this screen will be compatible with Sky Television's proposed High Definition service (due in 2006)?


Sharp:

Yes the LC45GD1E will be compatible with Sky's HDTV broadcast in 2006.


Me:

Is it capable of handling all of the following input signal formats? And can it handle all of them both via component analogue input, and via DVI or HDMI with HDCP encryption?

1080p/60Hz (1920x1080 progressive scan, 60 frames per second)
1080p/50Hz (1920x1080 progressive scan, 50 frames per second)
1080i/60Hz (1920x1080 interlaced, 60 fields per second)
1080i/50Hz (1920x1080 interlaced, 60 fields per second)
720p/60Hz (1280x720 progressive scan, 60 frames per second)
720p/50Hz (1280x720 progressive scan, 50 frames per second)
576p/50Hz (DVD player playing PAL UK disc, progressive scan)
480p/60Hz (DVD player playing NTSC disc, progressive scan)
576i/50Hz (output from standard Sky digibox)


Sharp:

As far as I am aware there is no format that uses 1080p however the 45GD1E has a resolution of 1920 x 1080 x RGB so not only will it handle all of the formats you have listed but the screens native resolution is indeed HD.

Given that LCD displays are inherently progressive and that the LC45GD1E has a pixel resolution of 1920x1080 it would be pretty weird if it didn't do 1080p....


 

Rob20

Well-known Member
ianh64 said:
Erm, probably not. What I was meaning to say, if the original did not come across like that was, "I cannot believe that Sharp have omitted 1080p on this model".

Where is it definately stated that it will do 1080p. Its not mentioned as a supported resolution in the manual.

-Ian

Ok, infact that's eaxctly how it reads. It was a double negative, but it was used correctly. I apologise as occasionally people include a double negative in an attempt to stregthen their point. I thought you may have been saying you didn't think 1080p would be included. Right, now that's cleared up, as for the Sharp 45" doing 1080p, it's claimed on the Sharp.com site. Here's an excert:

'Sharp’s LC-45GD6U AQUOS™ is a breathtaking 45" widescreen HDTV1 that can easily enhance the decor of any family room, living room or den. The LC-45GD6U is the largest LC-TV on the market today (along with other 45" Sharp models), and it displays all content in full HD spec (1080p) resolution, the highest of the DTV resolutions. With a 16:9 aspect ratio, unbeatable resolution of 1920 x 1080 and vivid color purity, it is a next-generation TV to carry you into the high-definition future'.

Lastly, re-reading my response to your first post I thought I came accross a bit abrupt/rude. So sorry for that, not intending to offend. just have a tendancy to type what I'm thinking.
 

ianh64

Active Member
I urge caution on the 1080p compatibility. The information supplied by Sharp contradicts the manual and the marketing blurb "...and it displays all content in full HD spec (1080p) resolution,..." can just as easily read "all content is converted to 1080p resolution" which is not the same as saying that it will accept 1080p.

With regard to the manual, the PC compatibility tables (pg 79) does not list 1080p nor 1080i strangely, so this may be an omission. Also the allowable AV inputs are not listed, but by inference 1080i is accepted by the statement on pg 69 about AV dot for dot mode ~ "Displays an image with the same number of pixels on the screen (only when receiving 1080i signal)." and the note ~ "In the case where the signal received is 1080i (when receiving HDTV broadcasts from an external source), mode selections will not alternate as shown and some modes may not be displayed.". Surely, if 1080p was acceptable would it not be mentioned in these statement?

I never believe what is written until I try it for myself especially if the source is a review or someone on customer service.

-Ian
 
U

Ultim8Fury

Guest
Using the "PC Digital" or "PC Analogue" inputs then you can't get 1080i or p into the display. However its not hard to set up the PC to output ATSC standard 1080i, which the display accepts as either AV analogue or AV digital. Failing that the more dangerous route is to drive the display directly without mediabox intervention. This is not recommended as you will be removing a layer of protection from the screen from bad resolutions. Also it stops the remote control working.
 

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