Anyone watching "Tough young teachers" on BBC3?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by paulr, Feb 8, 2014.

  1. paulr

    paulr
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    What a great series on BBC3 (and iplayer). I find the six new teachers just fantastic young people, with so much enthusiasm. A great insight into modern school life.
    Nothing like my day though. Never would we dare to talk to teachers the way they do, and no way were the teachers as "familiar" with the kids as shown in the program.

    Some of those kids are in for a huge shock.
     
  2. Graham27

    Graham27
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    I'll need to have a look on iPlayer for that. A few of my family and close friends are relatively new teachers, and some of their stories are shocking. It's a tough job, and I pity teachers when the inevitable "Yes, but what about the holidays?" digs come out.
     
  3. NorvernRob

    NorvernRob
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    They wouldn't even get a job at a lot of schools. Schools are micromanaged and judged on performance so much that many won't employ NQT's, the school my Mrs works at certainly won't.

    Sad state of affairs really.
     
  4. paulr

    paulr
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    So what happens if a school gets low grades?
     
  5. Mr Noble

    Mr Noble
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    teachers training days?, most schools don't fail due to the teachers but the pupils not putting the effort in or pissing around, the majority of pupils are capable of passing tests and doing work asked of them but like to act the class clown. That problem is due to lack of discipline not knowledge in my experience.

    My class had 30+ around 6 or 7 pupils did everything asked of them and got high scores consistently and had no problems, the rest just liked to piss around i'm ashamed to admit I was one of them.

    Everyone of my reports from primary through to secondary stated more than capable, easily distracted and likes to act the class clown.

    My highest GCSE was a C and a distinction in ICT , the 6 or so others that always listened and worked well straight A's across the board, the rest of the class ranged from C to U's! if I could turn back the time and knuckle down I would in a heartbeat. We were all taught the same but some took the knowledge on board differently or in some cases not at all.

    I have a few teachers that I talk to regularly on facebook (my old head of year has a son the same age) so relate when one of our boys does or says something new , and they all say the same i've changed for the better compared to when I was at school :)
     
  6. Bl4ckGryph0n

    Bl4ckGryph0n
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    Yes I've been watching. An interesting insight, and also fascinating to see the different expectation levels between the teachers and their pupils.
     
  7. nheather

    nheather
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    I agree that the student teachers put a lot of effort and dedication but I'm no so impressed with the fast-track system they are being allowed to go through.

    My wife is having her mid-life crisis and has decided to give up her life as a Finance Director with its huge pay and all the trappings to become a student teacher.

    She is currently doing her PGCE which basically entails a year of teaching 4 days a week at schools, with a supporting qualified teacher and under regular observation and review. Before that she had to do a conversion course to prove that she could do mathematics.

    At the end of that she will qualify to be a NQT and at the schools around us even then she won't have sole charge of a class - she will have to be supported for a year.

    By comparison, the students on this programme have been selected as high achievers at university and put on a fast track, which involves a 6 week boot camp and then given sole charge of a class. I'm sorry, but just because you finished top in your class in mechanic engineering doesn't mean that you are a great teacher and can skip all the teaching theory.

    I feel sorry for them, they are being thrown in at the deep end without the tools and training to do the job. Moreover, I feel sorry for the children whose education is put at more risk because they have inadequately prepared teachers.

    But I do accept that they work really hard and take my hat off to them - there is no way I could put up with that.

    I just thing the system is struggling and schemes like this are like putting band aids on major wounds.

    Cheers,

    Nigel
     
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  8. paulr

    paulr
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    Yes, and how lame some of the parents are.
    I can see an educational divide developing. Poor school, low expectations, semi-qualified teachers vs great school, keen to learn kids, well paid fully qualified teachers.
     
  9. NorvernRob

    NorvernRob
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    A school will fail its Ofsted inspection if the expected targets aren't reached (they can fail for plenty of other things as well), then it will get a year to improve, in which time Ofsted will come back. If the improvements haven't been made it will be shut down and replaced with a privately run academy.

    My wife says failing schools get a lot of money thrown at them though so they do tend to improve within that 12 month period.

    Her school is overdue it's Ofsted inspection, she's spent the entire weekend doing work and updating files and is still at it now. So much for a 35 hour week :laugh:
     
  10. paulr

    paulr
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    Seems a bit severe, shutting down a school.
     
  11. Bl4ckGryph0n

    Bl4ckGryph0n
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    Yup, regardless of how good a teacher is, if the parents don't support it, it goes wrong ultimately. Real shame as everyone has got the same opportunities, and it doesn't cost anything to be keen to learn...Their choice, perhaps a cut in benefits will help realise that they got to get of their backside (in a figure of speech and get involved...)
     
  12. Peridot

    Peridot
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    Irrespective of the 'rules' she may find that she's in sole charge with very little support far quicker than she expects. My wife works as a supply teaching assistant or whatever they're called these days. As funding cuts have bitten in the last few years work her assignments have grown more sporadic, due mainly to the fact that schools are putting their permanent teaching assistants in charge of classes when the teachers are unavailable through illness or other reasons.

    She even turns up to bookings to find that it's the teacher that's off and she's expected to take charge of a class. The school has called her agency and asked for a level 3 supply assistant rather than a supply teacher. She refuses to do it, which usually results in complete chaos, but some her younger colleagues feel pressurised into doing it and say nothing. I'm sure we all expect our children to have a qualified teacher in charge of their classroom but that is certainly not always the case.
     
  13. nheather

    nheather
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    I'm sure you are right. I only have knowledge of a handful of schools, the ones my children have attended and the ones my wife has been assigned to. None of those allow NQTs to be in sole charge of a class in their first year. That is not to say that there won't be occasions when they have to take charge when necessary - like when the main teacher is away.

    My experienced might be skewed also because I live in an area where even the poorer schools are well above average. We do get a fair number of teachers doing 30 mile commutes to work at them.

    Cheers,

    Nigel
     

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