Anyone using an ethernet splitter to share one line for a Samsung smart tv and the other line for a pc?

MartinTweak

Standard Member
My Neo Qled 43" QN90A will be delivered in a couple days and if use an ethernet splitter to share the same net line with the tv and my pc will it slow down the net speed on the pc? The ethernet is from a ATT Uverse router. PC is a I7-7700 with a Titan RTX video card. Don't really want to use wifi for security and speed reasons.

Also I'm considering not even using the Smart TV features so I may use the tv disconnected from the net. So I'd have just the power and hdmi cable connected to it for pc gaming and movies. Then to update the tv firmware I though I could just connect the ethernet cable from the splitter to the tv, do the update, then unplug the ethernet from the tv and keep on gaming and watching films. Is that a viable way to update the tv firmware/software?
 

cuke2u

Well-known Member
I don't have any experience of using a splitter, as we'd never use them with our commercial networks, but I doubt if a splitter would be able to duplex plus I don't think they'll be particularly good at handling data. A switch is a far better solution for sharing a network connection and they really aren't that expensive these days..
 

MartinTweak

Standard Member
The switch will disconnect the ethernet line from my pc which is ok with me. So instead of a switch could I also unplug it from the pc and plug it in the ethernet port on the tv just to update the tv firmware? Then plug it back into the pc. I don't know if I'll need my pc on the net to start the tv firmware update. Maybe I can use the tv remote to initiate and complete the tv updates from the net?
 
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JayCee

Distinguished Member
An Ethernet switch won't disconnect your PC or anything else connected to it.
It's not a “switch” as such, it acts like a splitter letting you share your network with multiple devices.
 

Jay53

Well-known Member
Does the ATT Uverse router provide IP addresses or it it just providing a single IP that an ISP assigns? If it's the latter then i assume a switch wouldn't be enough?
 

cuke2u

Well-known Member
Yeah a switch could be a confusing name as you have implied, however one will be fine. Your hub or router should send out IP's out to all your devices through any switch as it provides them from it's Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, or DHCP management for short. I can assure they do function ok, we have a number where I work, some not cheap either.

 

Dannysonic

Member
I have my TV, Youview box, Xbox and a laptop (when being used) all plugged into a network switch. It all works fine together and does not disconnect any of the devices.
If I remember right when you receive the QN90A you need a Samsung account to log into the TV to set it up. Without a Samsung account and connecting the TV to the internet you won't be able to set it up.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
A splitter (if that’s what actually meant) can use 2 of the 4 pairs to run to one device and the other two to run to the other device. You need a splitter at both ends and it will be limited to 100Mbits, so if you internet is faster then yes you will limit. They used to get round the limitation of only having one cable.

However as the others have said a switch will take one cable and “split” the signal into how ever many ports it has on it. It doesn’t really split it, in simple terms it directs traffic from one device to another automatically.
 

KBD

Well-known Member
A more popular term is Router, because it routes the bandwidth to where it needs to be.
My parents have two Roku-equipped TVs, but they can only stream on one at a time, because they're on a 5 Mbps line.
In their case the router is the Wireless Access Point, but it's also a hardwire to the PC in front of it.

If you're on a 50 Mbps line or more, I wouldn't be concerned.
 

Boris Blank

Member
Does the TV have a 10/100 ethernet socket or full gigbit socket. If its 10/100 you may find that wifi is actually faster depending on the TV's chipset.

If set on ethernet (which is my preference), pick up a Netgear GS105 switch or similar (£16 new, I think the latest model is now GS305?), plug that into the router using an ethernet cable and then plug two ethernet cables into the GS105, one for the PC and one for the telly. No buttons to press or anything, everything is connected to the internet permanently. Simple!

You won't see much difference if streaming say Netflix on the telly whilst using your PC online or especially when downloading. The PC could max out your bandwidth and the Netflix quality can suffer slightly when first starting up but then settles down to normal by buffering a bit longer but I rarely if ever have any major issues (I'm on 50Mbps too).
 

cuke2u

Well-known Member
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member


It depends on what you are streaming to the TV, most if not all online streaming services are less than 50Mbits and so you don't need faster than a 100Mbps connection. The only time you need quicker is if you are streaming some UHD rips to the TV using an application (such as Plex) on the TV and those have a bitrate of over ~100Mbps which means the file size will be in the order of 100GB for a 2 hour film.

If you go wireless you are then might well get a quicker connection but no real benefit if no large rips and you are then competing for WiFi air time with everything else.
 

cuke2u

Well-known Member
I know about the differences thank you. I was replying to Boris's post about the ethernet socket speeds. Obviously, being not an old TV, the ethernet socket is rated up to 100..
 

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