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Anyone use a UPS power backup with their projector?

leeuk321

Established Member
Hey all, I was just wondering if anyone uses a UPS power backup / regulator with their projector? It's something I've thought about getting, just to protect the projector against possible power cuts. I also worry about voltage drops, which I hear that UPS devices protect against with AVR (automatic voltage regulation), just in case e.g. certain devices draw power at the same time and it limits the overall power on the circuit. Might never happen, but if that did happen, I'm assuming that the projector would either dim and/or it would cause damage? That, together with power cuts, surges, spikes, brownouts, are things that I worry about.

For reference, I've got a JVC DLA-X700 projector and I'm thinking about getting a pure sinewave UPS device, specifically the CyberPower CP1500EPFCLCD-UK.

Any help, tips, previous experience or know-how would be much appreciated!
 

linnasak

Established Member
Been some discussions on this before. Debate is that the quality of the sine wave, if poor can damage projectors power supply. So weigh up risk from power cut vs exposure over time of sine curve. Suggest if if you go for this you look at the better UPS not the cheapest from Amazon!

For power outages I have connected mine to remote sockets, these have a default off state. Then if power interrupted, I consciously power up when supply stable. I think it is the repeating off & ons that can cause damage.

kevin
 

leeuk321

Established Member
Hi Kevin, thanks for your reply. Yes, I've heard to get one with a good quality sine wave, which is why I was going to get a CyberPower model (heard they're pretty much the go-to brand in UK). And yes, I know what you mean about those £40-60 Amazon models.

I couldn't really find much talk on UK UPS devices for projectors, perhaps I'm searching wrong, do you have any links by any chance please? Would love to hear other people's thoughts and experiences if there's been a lot of previous discussions.

Cheers!
 

ask4me2

Prominent Member
Have used different UPS on different projectors for many years (2005).

Used a 3KW 200kg model on my CRT projectors, because when working on or using a CRT and if getting a power outage it is a risk of spot burn that ruined the tubes if not shut down correctly. Lamp-based projectors often like to have the cooling fan running a while after the lamp is turned off the normal way. The worst scenario for a lamp-based projector is to loos the power just after it has started up, and/or trying to restart the lamp when it is still hot. (that may leed to a short circuit and the lamp cannot be started again)

Today I use an APC Smart-UPS C1500 on my 2 JVC projectors (the C1500 have no fan spinning and it is completely silent when the power line is on) and I get plenty of the time to make a normal shutdown of the projector if I suffer a power outage watching a movie.

All projectors I have used (Barco, Sony, Epson, JVC, Panasonic) use a switch-mode power supply (SMPS) just like PC equipment these UPS often is made to protect, so there is often no need for perfect sinus on these devices.

The only thing I consider choosing a UPS is that it is powerful enough to run the projector due to its power consumption and can run for 5-10 min.
The other thing is that the UPS does not make any audible fan or high-frequency noise at a normal run, so it can be placed in the home cinema.

Using cheap or bad UPS that is not up to the task may cause a sudden power outage for the projector all by themself, so that should be avoided.
 

JL12W7

Established Member
Have used different UPS on different projectors for many years (2005).

Used a 3KW 200kg model on my CRT projectors, because when working on or using a CRT and if getting a power outage it is a risk of spot burn that ruined the tubes if not shut down correctly. Lamp-based projectors often like to have the cooling fan running a while after the lamp is turned off the normal way. The worst scenario for a lamp-based projector is to loos the power just after it has started up, and/or trying to restart the lamp when it is still hot. (that may leed to a short circuit and the lamp cannot be started again)

Today I use an APC Smart-UPS C1500 on my 2 JVC projectors (the C1500 have no fan spinning and it is completely silent when the power line is on) and I get plenty of the time to make a normal shutdown of the projector if I suffer a power outage watching a movie.

All projectors I have used (Barco, Sony, Epson, JVC, Panasonic) use a switch-mode power supply (SMPS) just like PC equipment these UPS often is made to protect, so there is often no need for perfect sinus on these devices.

The only thing I consider choosing a UPS is that it is powerful enough to run the projector due to its power consumption and can run for 5-10 min.
The other thing is that the UPS does not make any audible fan or high-frequency noise at a normal run, so it can be placed in the home cinema.

Using cheap or bad UPS that is not up to the task may cause a sudden power outage for the projector all by themself, so that should be avoided.
Would you not be worried about those UPS devices I mean there are two sealed lead acid batteries inside there what if one of them deformed and went up in flames say when you were not in the house and you came back to the house burning to the ground reason I ask was it happened to a friend of ours but they caught it in time as it wasd hissing and fizzing so they turned the electric off and were able to deal with it but none the less it was a scary experience ever since they just take the risk I myself had one go bang under my computer desk sure lit up the room computer was fine though so I tend to stay away from those things from that moment on. I think I would prefer the projector to just turn off and if it meant repalcing the bulb sooner becuase of shutdown and bulb degradation so be it I'll use a circuit breaker instead without the UPS backup.
 

ask4me2

Prominent Member
Would you not be worried about those UPS devices I mean there are two sealed lead acid batteries inside there what if one of them deformed and went up in flames say when you were not in the house and you came back to the house burning to the ground reason I ask was it happened to a friend of ours but they caught it in time as it wasd hissing and fizzing so they turned the electric off and were able to deal with it but none the less it was a scary experience ever since they just take the risk I myself had one go bang under my computer desk sure lit up the room computer was fine though so I tend to stay away from those things from that moment on. I think I would prefer the projector to just turn off and if it meant repalcing the bulb sooner becuase of shutdown and bulb degradation so be it I'll use a circuit breaker instead without the UPS backup.

Yes you are correct JL12W7, there always a risk with all kinds of batteries especially when charging or with high power output drains etc. Have seen and smelled what lead-acid UPS batteries can do in the server room etc. However the power desity in a lead-acid battery is lower than the newer Lithium based batteries, so actually, I am more afraid my other equipment with newer battery technologies inside can suddenly start a fire all by themself.
With proper use and servicing, a UPS should not represent a greater risk than any other electrical equipment normally connected to a power source.
 
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JL12W7

Established Member
Yes you are correct JL12W7, there always a risk with all kinds of batteries especially when charging or with high power output drains etc. Have seen and smelled what lead-acid UPS batteries can do in the server room etc. However the power desity in a lead-acid battery is lower than the newer Lithium based batteries, so actually, I am more afraid my other equipment with newer battery technologies inside can suddenly start a fire all by themself.
With proper use and servicing, a UPS should not represent a greater risk than any other electrical equipment normally connected to a power source.
Thank you for the constructive and very informative reply all makes sense so taking your advice I have opted for the APC Easy UPS BVX 1600VA, 230V, AVR, IEC Sockets. That should do the trick and save the projector form premature bulb failure though in the last 18 years we have had the electricity go off twice in that time so is it a necessary money spend. I don’t know as that puppy costs £179.
 

ask4me2

Prominent Member
Wow, only 2x (unscheduled?) power losses in the last 18 years, that sounds to me like there is a very stable power supply in your area. Think the stability of a typical small UPS itself can be a bigger problem during the next 18 years so it is maybe not a good idea to use £179 on that.

l do experience let say 3-5 unscheduled power loss every year (typically in the winter or bad weather) and found the use of UPS not only for the projectors but also during firmware upgrades on differen equipment or another type of data works when sudden power looses can make new problems.

My old 3Kw UPS was nice to use to run the coffee machine during longer power outs...:D
 

JL12W7

Established Member
Yes very true but then it is like an insurance you many never uses it yet you cough up every year for that insurance for your car I have been paying for car insurance for over 35 years and never made a claim supposed to buy that battery backup would be an investment because I can always replace with new batteries every two to three years and it will be more than enough power to keep the projector going until proper shut down if the electricity ever went down while the proejctor was running. Now my other house which is in the country rural out in the back of beyond if I had the projector there then yes, I can experience power cuts quite frequently at least one or twice a month or even more during the winter months especially when there are gale force winds which we get a lot of. The wind blows from the mountains unhindered as there is nothing to stop it straight down the valley to my house it is a wonder the roof never gets ripped off the house thankfully that has never happened came evry close one time toppled trees are a refquent situation as winters are pretty bleak.
 

stretcher

Established Member
So I think my take-aways from this so far are:

1. A UPS is probably a worthwhile investment.
2. A silently operating one is important.
3. A sine wave output is desirable but perhaps not absolutely essential?
4. An awareness of the risks of existing battery technology
5. A budget of about £300 should be sufficient, and avoid the cheapo Chinese ones (common sense anyway I guess)

I have a Sony VPL-VW270ES and a bulb replacement is in the order of £300 as well. It currently is powered from an newly installed 13A ceiling socket and as such is permanently in stand by - I wonder if I should invest in a remote switch to fully turn off the PJ but also the UPS when not in use? Then may reduce any fire risk?
 

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