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Anyone still using cd's?

HenryHonda

Active Member
Streaming? Is that like renting music?
Like the analogy :D

If all you do is stream - but not download - then the analogy is exactly right. If your streaming service goes out of business, or becomes prohibitively expensive, you've got absolutely nothing to show for your expenditure.

I still buy (good quality) vinyl, CDs, SACDs, Blu-rays, download FLAC and DSD files - and subscribe to Tidal HiFi. I find Tidal particularly useful for evaluating an album before purchase. Downloads are stored on my main PC, stored and sometimes streamed from my QNAP NAS, and also backed-up to another external hard drive. However, with my purchase of a Denon DCD-2500NE SACD player, I am now burning downloads to CD-R and DVD-R, and playing directly from the Denon.

I prefer physical media, because it is not subject to unpredictable external influences. Streaming involves passing digital data through a number of electrical pipelines and network nodes. I don't subscribe to the "0's and 1's" argument either - digital data transmission involves error correction systems (as do CDs and SACDs) and added digital 'noise' - I don't have as much faith in end-to-end maintenance of sound quality via streaming as in physical media.

Increasingly though, I try to be very careful as to how a particular album has been mastered. As we all know, there is just too much music around these days that has been subject to lunatic levels of loudness boosting and dynamic range compression - principally for the .mp3 player community and/or those who don't appreciate high quality sound. Mind you, I've also returned a few vinyl pressings which have been subject to the same abuse in the 'remastering' process. I first became aware of this abuse when I (foolishly, in retrospect) bought a set of Alan Parsons albums which had been 'remastered' - excruciatingly bad. I went back to my original CDs, and again enjoyed the music as it should have been.

I tend to stick to pressings from Mobile Fidelity and Music on Vinyl, for any vinyl purchase. 180g vinyl means nothing when the mastering was screwed in the first place...

Rant over...;)

When (if, in my lifetime) the day comes when physical media is no longer available, then downloads will be my main source - backups being essential.
 
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dannnielll

Well-known Member
DACs are much better, oversampling and upsampling are far more sophisticated. Streaming and CD ripping are now viable HiFi techniques. Love listening to all of them and vinyl replay. Legacy listening supplemented with the latest technology. We have never had it better! I for one won't miss FM radio, nothing worth listening to and crap reproduction. The signal is cut off at 15KHz and the BBCs transmission system is awful. Don't listen to Radio 3 and the rest are beyond annoying. Internet radio however is in a different league. Diverse types of music and if you are careful great sound.
I agree with most of your position, but I think you are hard on FM radio. I listen nearly every day .In fact one of my reasons for getting the Digital Audio Player I got ..a Sony NWA 25 was its FM radio,since having migrated to a Samsung S7 phone, it did not have one. I do however enjoy the Tunein Radio App on that same S7
 

musicphil

Active Member
Here is a thought regarding streaming and those that pay and download it.....what if those companies that do sell the streaming for downloads start to encrypt the tracks with say a built in time frame. E.g. so after 6 months the track is automatically deleted?
Streaming and downloads might end up being rental music in the end.
 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
I still listen to a bit of radio. Usually when working through a Makita site radio, so not exactly quality sound, but it breaks the silence. French radio is pretty dire though. Same 10-15 sings on repeat all day with the odd bit of chatter from the 'dj'.
 

simonblue

Distinguished Member
Qobuz and tidal offer CD quality and above. Also there is Deezer and Amazon music HD. Some others around too.

They're installing fiber in my area (put the cable up last week), so once we're hooked up I'm going back to streaming hi-res. The difference between cd and hi-res is night and day to me...or my cd player sucks!
Not here,my CD player out perform all the streaming services tried so far :)
 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
What do you have?
 

dannnielll

Well-known Member
Here is a thought regarding streaming and those that pay and download it.....what if those companies that do sell the streaming for downloads start to encrypt the tracks with say a built in time frame. E.g. so after 6 months the track is automatically deleted?
Streaming and downloads might end up being rental music in the end.
They do. Using Deezer premium , one can download tracks and albums ,and they can be listened to while the subscription is valid. So when you stop paying, it becomes unplayable 1 month later.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Even streaming services are going to suffer from the same crap dynamic ranges that are being output by artists and engineers. We've been listening to Lewis Capaldi, great album and artists, but dynamically stunted, no soundstage. Played it back to back to show the missus what I meant with Cat Stevens Catch a Bull at Four. Clarity, depth, soundstage, instrumental separation just no comparison to Capaldi's CD.

Streaming, CD, vinyl does it matter what you play if the original production is so poor and is aimed at those listening on earphones and cheap PC cards.
 

dannnielll

Well-known Member
I still listen to a bit of radio. Usually when working through a Makita site radio, so not exactly quality sound, but it breaks the silence. French radio is pretty dire though. Same 10-15 sings on repeat all day with the odd bit of chatter from the 'dj'.
Radio Classique is pretty good., But maybe a little to much talking about Bartok than is goid for the soul.
 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
Yup too much yammering for me.
 
I still use CDs occasionally, like I do with any other medium. Why would I want to change it?
I have got all my favourite tracks from many CDs on mp3s, I can play through my vintage hi-fi. But I'd never go to the effort of transferring whole CDs, it's not that important, or worth the effort.
Now and again I put on a CD and just let it run, "for the hell of it."

"So much to do, so little time."
 

Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
They do. Using Deezer premium , one can download tracks and albums ,and they can be listened to while the subscription is valid. So when you stop paying, it becomes unplayable 1 month later.
This is why I like having the media. Plus backups of the rips of course.
 

HenryHonda

Active Member
Can I ask what software and settings you guys use to rip your CD's to flac please?
I use dBPoweramp, and I rip to FLAC at 44.1 kHz/16-bit. Standard CDs are 44.1 kHz/16-bit - and, at the simplest level, you can not produce anything which wasn't there in the first place...

FLAC is generally more commonly accepted by a range of players, and can also carry much more detailed metadata.

When your DAC has good filters (they're generally much better these days), and proper analog post-filtering there should be no benefit to higher sample rates and bit depths.

For SACDs (DSD64), in general, ripping to 96 kHz/24-bit FLAC is the closest match - and the same ripping parameters in general for Blu-ray Audio but, in some cases, can be higher. Original DVD-Audio rips to 48 kHz/24-bit but again, like Blu-ray, later encodings could go higher.
 

DIBSTER

Active Member
I use dBPoweramp, and I rip to FLAC at 44.1 kHz/16-bit. Standard CDs are 44.1 kHz/16-bit - and, at the simplest level, you can not produce anything which wasn't there in the first place...

FLAC is generally more commonly accepted by a range of players, and can also carry much more detailed metadata.

Another vote here for dBPowerAmp for ripping my CD's into FLAC files.

Over the years I've ripped over 1500 Cds, almost exclusively via dBPowerAmp. Easy to use, accurate, and compared to EAC, fast. I did try EAC but every CD took an age to rip so jacked that in.
 

dannnielll

Well-known Member
I still use CDs occasionally, like I do with any other medium. Why would I want to change it?
I have got all my favourite tracks from many CDs on mp3s, I can play through my vintage hi-fi. But I'd never go to the effort of transferring whole CDs, it's not that important, or worth the effort.
Now and again I put on a CD and just let it run, "for the hell of it."

"So much to do, so little time."
I Fully follow that argument. The Chromecast audio was the favourite upgrade to allow good vintage kit handle the streaming. And with any home network and a bit of glue software everything that has been ripped can be played anywhere in the house. So rather than tackle the mind numbing task of attempting everything, just do it on an intermittent basis. I put the majority of the family CDs as FLACs as a retirement project, and were I to lose the data, I would lose the will to live. But augmenting it casually is no big deal
 
I Fully follow that argument. The Chromecast audio was the favourite upgrade to allow good vintage kit handle the streaming. And with any home network and a bit of glue software everything that has been ripped can be played anywhere in the house. So rather than tackle the mind numbing task of attempting everything, just do it on an intermittent basis. I put the majority of the family CDs as FLACs as a retirement project, and were I to lose the data, I would lose the will to live. But augmenting it casually is no big deal

I'm quite selective, rather than CDs my first choice is one of these, it's for "the nostalgia element."
Due to the limited choices of these from the age of vinyl, you have to really like something to include it from whichever era.


For the most part, the thousands of mp3s I have on a stick in the side of the TV I can play through my vintage hi-fi, are usually ignored.
 

dannnielll

Well-known Member
I'm quite selective, rather than CDs my first choice is one of these, it's for "the nostalgia element."
Due to the limited choices of these from the age of vinyl, you have to really like something to include it from whichever era.


For the most part, the thousands of mp3s I have on a stick in the side of the TV I can play through my vintage hi-fi, are usually ignored.
Well that is generally the best thing to do with low data rate MP3. In fairness the 320k MP3 s are getting into the "..Are you sure its not butter " territory
 

gibbsy

Moderator
At this moment I'm listening to the Steven Wilson remix of Jethro Tull's Benefit on CD. Whether it's Wilson's remixing prowess coming to the fore but this album sounds wonderful, as in fairness do all of Wilson's remixes from Tull's back catalogue.

Still got the vinyl locked away in the loft. Heaven knows what state my vinyls are in now, I've not looked at them this century.
 

Ron Hilditch

Active Member
Listening to Little Feat, Let It Roll on CD. Americana doesn't sound better than this. Been going through my CD collection since buying a Denon DCD2500NE. Vinyl for the time being is taking a back seat!
 

simonblue

Distinguished Member
At this moment I'm listening to the Steven Wilson remix of Jethro Tull's Benefit on CD. Whether it's Wilson's remixing prowess coming to the fore but this album sounds wonderful, as in fairness do all of Wilson's remixes from Tull's back catalogue.

Still got the vinyl locked away in the loft. Heaven knows what state my vinyls are in now, I've not looked at them this century.
You got to go look :D
 

gizlaroc

Distinguished Member
I got rid of CDs just over 5 years ago.

I kept the player for SACD and DVD-A, but I have been with Tidal 5 years now.
Qobuz and Tidal beat CD for quality and get to try so much more music.

I used to buy around 4-5 CDs a month I guess, but listen to so much more now.

Rasberry Pi, Tone Board Dac, Qobuz/Tidal and Volumio sounds incredible.
Beats the £3500 disc/dac set up I had 5 years back and beats all the £2000 streamers too and cost £120. How things move on.
 

simonblue

Distinguished Member
I got rid of CDs just over 5 years ago.

I kept the player for SACD and DVD-A, but I have been with Tidal 5 years now.
Qobuz and Tidal beat CD for quality and get to try so much more music.

I used to buy around 4-5 CDs a month I guess, but listen to so much more now.

Rasberry Pi, Tone Board Dac, Qobuz/Tidal and Volumio sounds incredible.
Beats the £3500 disc/dac set up I had 5 years back and beats all the £2000 streamers too and cost £120. How things move on.
Sorry but i have heard this so many times,my £120 system sound so much better than,those expensive ones out their,i have turned up to hear them,and they sound crap.
:)
 

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