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Anyone still using cd's?

drummerman

Active Member
I sold my TT, vinyl and cd's years ago. These days I exclusively stream.

Never looked back and I don't miss the clutter.

How many of you still use cd's?
 

mushii

Well-known Member
Streaming is OK for casual listening but nothing beats putting a silver disk in the tray, sitting down and listening to an album. I buy more CDs now than I have ever done. I also rip all my CDs to FLAC and have them on my NAS and my DAP.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Had two delivered yesterday and I'm waiting on an SACD as well. Only play CD or SACD. Invested heavily on SACD playback over the last couple of years.
 

Andy98765

Distinguished Member
Streaming is great for casual listening but for quality, NAH!. I know you can get HD streams but still not the same. Don't get me wrong I have spotify for the car, mobile, tablet and in the garden etc.
Give me the clutter anyday.

P.S. same goes for films. UHD Blu-Ray = very high quality, Netflix, Apple and Amazon = good quality, all have poor sound, i.e. no HD audio. But again I do have them for general watching and films for my Grandson and dare I say Wife.
 

AceFactor

Active Member
We're in the process of ditching physical for digital.

I personally love CD's; the look, feel, motion required to setup and listen, however space is at a premium in our new house so they have to go (bar a few with sentimental attachments).

Still keeping the physical disc player though....
 

Thrupnibits

Active Member
Since the recent arrival of the stunning Audiolab 6000CDT into my life, I'm appreciating my CD's more than ever. I buy CD's instead of vinyl these days.
 

Nico72

Active Member
Streaming FLAC stored in a NAS at home. I ripped all my CDs about ten years ago, but I still play the odd one in the car.
 

musicphil

Active Member
Still use vinyl and CD's
Streaming? Is that like renting music?
 

dannnielll

Well-known Member
I sold my TT, vinyl and cd's years ago. These days I exclusively stream.

Never looked back and I don't miss the clutter.

How many of you still use cd's?
You see the other answers. In my case we have perhaps 2 thousand of the beasts in the house. I took as a retirement project to FLAC some of those,. My son uses his CD player often, my daughter her MP3 ,my wife her Apple nano, myself a Sony Flac player, another son streaming from his own MP3 FlAC library.. actually linked to mine.
I rarely spin the silver disc, but it is the licence to retain the FLACed copy, so many of the discs are physically moving in storage cases into the attic.
 

dannnielll

Well-known Member
Still use vinyl and CD's
Streaming? Is that like renting music?
It depends where the streaming is from. On Spotify premium etc .yes it is just renting but in my case, I have the lots of my CDs stored on a hard drive,as FLAC copies, and they can be streamed to anywhere around the house.. maybe even around the world? ,But I don't do that. The TVs, the stereo system with Chrome cast Audio makes it simple.
However I also like the immediately and unpredictability of Radio and often listen to via TuneIn radio
 

Mark.Yudkin

Distinguished Member
I have some 7,500 CDs and still buy them. I also have 1,500 LPs, but that number has been frozen since 1984, and will either remain frozen or decrease (anybody want to purchase a lot of classical LPs? :)).

I only stream on vacation, using the phone / laptop to store music for streaming to the rental car / Dali Katch. The original sources of that music are the CDs. I do not subscribe to any service.
 

toon10

Active Member
I have a large CD collection but I never listen to them now. I ripped them to FLAC and I have a 256GB thumbnail USB device with my CD collection connected to my amp and one in my car. Much more convenient. The rest of the time I use Spotify connect.

My car has a hard disk so I did start to rip my CD's to it but once I got the FLAC collection sorted out, that became pointless too.

My Hi-Fi setup actually sounds better playing FLAC via USB direct to the amp than it does through my Marantz CD player too.

Ironically, my 4 year old uses CD's more than me. He has a stupid echo dot thing in his bedroom but he has a play room where I put my old Technics CH-550 midi system in. He likes to listen to a specific CD of his mothers. Annoyingly when not using CD;'s, the most overused sentence in my house is "Alexa, play shotgun by George Ezra". :-(
 

Khankat

Active Member
I'm still playing CD's, although not as much as vinyl. I think of the CD more as a form of convenience. My son-in-law has never used a turntable, so he asked me to demonstrate. He came to consider the quality of sound worth the ritual setting-up procedure. I love radio, so have it on most of the time. I very much enjoy the prospect of hearing something new to me. Ridiculous, I know, but the problem I have with it, is the fear of missing something I might enjoy if I turn it off.
 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
I do. Usually one album a night followed by Spotify because I CBA to get up....I know :blush:
 

WozzaB

Active Member
Still buying cd's!
I did try streaming via Amazon Music HD, it's convenient, but I still like the whole process of deciding what to listen to, finding the disc, loading it etc, it adds to the listening experience for me:)
 
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mushii

Well-known Member
We're in the process of ditching physical for digital.

I personally love CD's; the look, feel, motion required to setup and listen, however space is at a premium in our new house so they have to go (bar a few with sentimental attachments).

Still keeping the physical disc player though....
I will take them off your hands, they will be in a good home where they are loved ;)
 

Sonic67

Distinguished Member
They died in 2011.

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Actually I bought a few more at Christmas.
 

Jaded1

Active Member
Hardcore here. CD TID.

Sold my records years back. Sometime I wish I still had them just as collected items rather than to play.
 

Timmy C

Distinguished Member
I still buy and play CD's but would usually choose to buy new releases on vinyl if a lossless download code is included. The vinyl is rarely, if ever played but the packaging is nicer and it will usually hold it's value unlike a modern cd so can be sold on or traded if I don't like it. I have no idea if that applies to all styles of music but it's certainly true in the indie/punk/rock/rock/metal/alternative world. I stream lots from the lossless music collection I have on my NAS but I tried online streaming services a couple of times and they just aren't for me for all kinds of reasons.
 

dannnielll

Well-known Member
I still buy and play CD's but would usually choose to buy new releases on vinyl if a lossless download code is included. The vinyl is rarely, if ever played but the packaging is nicer and it will usually hold it's value unlike a modern cd so can be sold on or traded if I don't like it. I have no idea if that applies to all styles of music but it's certainly true in the indie/punk/rock/rock/metal/alternative world. I stream lots from the lossless music collection I have on my NAS but I tried online streaming services a couple of times and they just aren't for me for all kinds of reasons.
I doubt that they hold their value. Collector items are just that , because they are rare . Nobody goes into Sainsbury's to collect tinned soup ,in the expectation that it will become a collector's item, whereas a 1912 box of Coleman's mustard might be.
I seriously believe that the vinyl "recovery" has been a massive swindle and con job.
 

Vogon

Active Member
I am old School, I like physical copies of media.
The only reason I would stream music is for the Hi res stuff, but I ain't paying £20 a month for that privilege !
I guess that's why SACD or DVDA never took off, because of streaming.
A damn shame IMO, I would welcome a Hi Res physical media version of CD that any BDP could play.
 
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Sonic67

Distinguished Member
A damn shame IMO, I would welcome a Hi Res physical media version of CD that any BDP could play.
There is.


Record companies are trying to tempt fans away from MP3s by releasing albums in a crystal-clear Blu-Ray format.

Nirvana's Nevermind and Amy Winehouse's Back To Black will be among the first records to be released in the format, which comes to the UK this month.

Listeners will need a Blu-Ray player and a stereo system to play the discs, which promise to deliver "the sound as it was intended by the artist".

However, high-fidelity audio products have failed to catch on in the past.




 

Timmy C

Distinguished Member
I doubt that they hold their value. Collector items are just that , because they are rare . Nobody goes into Sainsbury's to collect tinned soup ,in the expectation that it will become a collector's item, whereas a 1912 box of Coleman's mustard might be.
I seriously believe that the vinyl "recovery" has been a massive swindle and con job.
Well I didn't say anything about collectors items although some will be and some won't. And I'm not talking about the stuff you find on display racks in supermarkets either. What I mean is if you buy a new release record on a large independent label such as Fat Wreck for example, assuming it's in near mint condition but not rare you would still easily have a sale/swap value upwards of about 8 quid a couple of years later. If you bought the same thing on cd you would be lucky to get a couple of quid tops. This is nothing to do with vinyl 'recovery' as in more underground music scenes it never really went away in the first place.
 

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