Answered Anyone made their own Cantenna before?

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by alchemystical, Nov 11, 2017.

Tags:
  1. alchemystical

    alchemystical
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2005
    Messages:
    2,801
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +807
    If so how did it go? Get the boost you were after? I've seen those cheap ones on eBay and watched a teardown that showed they weren't made properly due to the internal antenna being the wrong size which throws a lot more noise into the mix so am thinking of making one myself.

    Failing that anyone got any good directional antenna recommendations?


    Cheers
     
  2. Best Answer:
    Post #6 by Chris Muriel, Nov 11, 2017 (1 points)
  3. mickevh

    mickevh
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,004
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    West London
    Ratings:
    +1,646
    Since you can buy an additional AP and/or HomePlug kit for less than 50GBP, why bother - unless you are a radio ham...?

    Additional hotspot(s) will give much better coverage improvement that any kind of "magic" antenna - and better throughput too (with careful channel choice, multiple hotspots can transmit simultaneously which will improve your throughput if you have multiple devices.)

    There are legitimate reasons to want to "play" with alternate antenna designs - not least for the hell of it - but if you're trying to improve "coverage" on the cheap with pringles cans and tin foil - I'd argue just don't bother: Spend the cost of a tank of petrol on an additional AP or a HomePlug kit. If you have a specific "problem" you are trying to address, if you post up some details, we can perhaps advise which if is the best solution for your use case.
     
  4. alchemystical

    alchemystical
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2005
    Messages:
    2,801
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +807
    Oh theres no real need for it at all, just something I fancy having a play around with as I just dug out my old external wifi card that supports proper antennas. Was a project I'd been interested in since wifi first took off and I'd actually bought all the bits and bobs to make one but never got round to it, hence why I'm asking as it seemed like a fun project.
     
  5. mickevh

    mickevh
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,004
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    West London
    Ratings:
    +1,646
    Fair enough - perhaps it might pay you to seek out more of a "radio hams" (or is "hamms"..?) web site for better advice. I think there are a couple of RF experts that read these boards, though I can't remember their handles.
     
  6. alchemystical

    alchemystical
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2005
    Messages:
    2,801
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +807
    Nice one, hopefully this will end the patchy wifi reception at the caravan as its generally decent but will be interesting to see what a difference this makes.
     
  7. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2002
    Messages:
    7,278
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Manchester
    Ratings:
    +761
    Best Answer
    I used a whisky can - this was about 12 years ago. The antenna probe (the brass part connected to the N-type socket) used an internally threaded brass standoff and brass screw.
    That enabled me to tune or adjust the probe for optimum length; as I recall, I got about 15 dBi gain. I made up a cable with the appropriate reverse sma connector for connecting to a Buffalo wireless G PCMCIA card's aerial socket (which plugged into my laptop).
    I also used to have a spreadsheet that allowed me to optimise the probe position based on can diameter and length; this (or similar utility) probably still exists online.
    Had great success with this during various business trips abroad.
    I might add that I am one of the aforementioned radio hams (callsign G3ZDM) and have previously built transverters and amplifiers (both receive and transmit types) for the amateur 2.3 GHz band which isn't far away from the 2.4 GHz WLAN frequencies so techniques required are similar. I also worked for a USA IC or semiconductor company at the time (I am now retired). One of my specialisms was technical support for our RF chips.
    .
     
  8. alchemystical

    alchemystical
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2005
    Messages:
    2,801
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +807
    Fantastic. Just the info I was seeking, thanks. I shall take a look into that and get back to you.

    Cheers
     

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice