Quantcast

Any one here know much about RTSP streams?

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
I’m trying, without success, to connect various RTSP playing apps to my NVR over my LAN. It supports RTSP, but I’m confused as to what the right IP address is etc.
The NVR IP is 192.168.8.117 (and the NVR says it’s using the standard port 554 for RTSP). But in the NVRs settings, each POE camera has its own IP address (10.151.151.101).

Which IP address should I be entering? And what format should the URL be?

Any clues?
 

cmclean

Active Member
I’m assuming all the cameras connect directly into the NVR. Your NVR will be running NAT and they way therefore to typical connecting to a camera assuming your doing it via a web browser would be via a port

So your URL would be something like <IP address of NVR>:<Port number> Usually you’d get the port numbers off the NVR menu
 

Bl4ckGryph0n

Distinguished Member
Perhaps I’m missing something, but shouldn’t all devices be on the same subnet unless there is a router in between somewhere. Or does your NVR provide internal routing and DHCP to the cameras?
 

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
Perhaps I’m missing something, but shouldn’t all devices be on the same subnet unless there is a router in between somewhere. Or does your NVR provide internal routing and DHCP to the cameras?
Cameras are connected directly to the NVR via Ethernet cables. The NVR is connected directly to my router with Ethernet cable. The device running the app I’m trying to pick up the RTSP stream is connected to the same router via WiFi.
 

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
Can you elaborate a bit please. Not sure what you mean by channel and input. What am I looking for?
Eg.

rtsp://192.168.1.100:554/Streaming/Channels/101/

The 101 is the channel so you need to change it to which channel your cameras are on the NVR.
 

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
Eg.

rtsp://192.168.1.100:554/Streaming/Channels/101/

The 101 is the channel so you need to change it to which channel your cameras are on the NVR.
Thanks for the reply. Sorry if I’m being thick, but I am slightly confused by ‘streaming’ and ‘channels’. I can’t see any reference to those on my NVR. Only IP addresses, port numbers and camera names.
 

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
Thanks for the reply. Sorry if I’m being thick, but I am slightly confused by ‘streaming’ and ‘channels’. I can’t see any reference to those on my NVR. Only IP addresses, port numbers and camera names.
The RTSP url is what I have. The IP address of your NVR which is on the same LAN as your router. /streaming is where the camera streams are located and channel is which channel your camera is on. Try it. Put the URL you create into VLC and you should be printed by the login for your NVR, enter it and then the stream should start. If it doesn’t, try channel 101, 103 etc.
You can also put rtsp://username:p[email protected]<IP of NVR>:554/streaming/channel/101 to auto input the credentials.
 

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
Does this mean anything to anyone who may have encountered the same? UPnP is activated on the router and NVR, and remote access via NAT works fine. But the screen in the image below lacks an external IP and says ‘not ready’. I’m guessing this is my problem, but I have no idea where to go from here.
EECD8981-BC48-4B4E-9CAD-6349F9B00B97.jpeg
 

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
That has Nothing to do with RTSP unless you want to view the camera externally using RTSP. I wouldn’t advise opening your NVR to the internet.
 

chazman88

Active Member
Can you give us some more information on what NVR and cameras you have. Might help in tracking down the correct information.
 

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
It’s an ONY-X Falcon NVR (rebranded Qvis) with 5MP POE that our Electrican installed. For the money, it’s actually pretty decent. Not HIKVISION I know.
 

PsyVision

Distinguished Member
The documentation for that NVR is really bad but it doesn't seem that tricky device to use. I would maybe recommend using this software to scan your local network and see if it gives you any information about the devices:

 

bardel

Well-known Member
I’m not familiar with this pvr at all, but I’d start off by saying you have two completely different ip networks running according to your post. You won’t be able to reach devices in the other network without a router configured to do this as one other member stated.

It sounds like your wifi router and nvr and presumably the remainder of your network are using 192.168.x.x addresses, but your cameras are using 10.x.x.x addresses.

If the NVR is reporting that it can reach the cameras and is recording the content, then I would suggest the NVR also has an IP address on the 10.x.x.x network (multihomed).

so unless the Nvr is capable of proxying the camera feeds then you will not be able to reach the content of the cameras from a device in the 192.168.x.x network.

is there a reason the cameras themselves are on a different network address range to the rest of the devices?
 

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
I’m not familiar with this pvr at all, but I’d start off by saying you have two completely different ip networks running according to your post. You won’t be able to reach devices in the other network without a router configured to do this as one other member stated.

It sounds like your wifi router and nvr and presumably the remainder of your network are using 192.168.x.x addresses, but your cameras are using 10.x.x.x addresses.

If the NVR is reporting that it can reach the cameras and is recording the content, then I would suggest the NVR also has an IP address on the 10.x.x.x network (multihomed).

so unless the Nvr is capable of proxying the camera feeds then you will not be able to reach the content of the cameras from a device in the 192.168.x.x network.

is there a reason the cameras themselves are on a different network address range to the rest of the devices?
I have no idea about the IP addresses. I was assuming that the NVR was allocating those IP’s to the cameras, as they POE ones that connect directly to the NVR’s RJ45 ports, and the NVR can run without a router.

I dont think my electrician has much networking knowledge, he pretty much just plugged them in and they worked. I can’t find any settings regarding this. I can set the NVR’s IP on my network, or have it automatic. Nothing about the actual camera.

Thanks.
 

bardel

Well-known Member
A router is only needed to allow you to connect to other IP address ranges, in most domestic scenarios this means 1 internal address range and the other ip ranges are referring to the Internet.

with my nvr, it can be used to assign addresses to the cameras also, rather than using the typical dhcp allocation found in domestic routers.

it’s possible your nvr also has a dhcp server, also has a dhcp server, but two dhcp servers on the same networkcauses problems.

I wonder therefore if your nvr has just been setup with a default configuration using a different network range than the remainder of your network?

Are you able to change the config of 1 of the cameras to dhcp or an unused address on the 192.168.x.x range? Once this is done you should be able to access it from other devices on the 192.168.x.x network.
 

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
A router is only needed to allow you to connect to other IP address ranges, in most domestic scenarios this means 1 internal address range and the other ip ranges are referring to the Internet.

with my nvr, it can be used to assign addresses to the cameras also, rather than using the typical dhcp allocation found in domestic routers.

it’s possible your nvr also has a dhcp server, also has a dhcp server, but two dhcp servers on the same networkcauses problems.

I wonder therefore if your nvr has just been setup with a default configuration using a different network range than the remainder of your network?

Are you able to change the config of 1 of the cameras to dhcp or an unused address on the 192.168.x.x range? Once this is done you should be able to access it from other devices on the 192.168.x.x network.
Thanks, I’ll look into that.

But my understanding from previous systems years ago was the NVR generates the RTSP stream, and you connect to the NVR’s IP address and port rather than individual cameras (unless it’s an independent IP camera on the network).

So If the IP address of the NVR is 198.162.1.12, then you should have an RTSP stream address that looks like rtsp://192.168.1.12:556/[camera name].

Most of what I have read online suggests this is the case, or am I reading that wrong?
 
Last edited:

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
Thanks, I’ll look into that.

But understanding from previous systems years ago was the NVR generates the RTSP stream, and you connect to the NVR’s IP address and port rather than individual cameras (unless it’s an independent IP camera on the network).

So If the IP address if the 198.162.1.12, then you should have an RTSP stream that look like rtsp://192.168.1.12:556/[camera name].

Most of what I have read online suggests this, am I reading that wrong?
That's how my Hikvision NVR works. You just have to get the right URL for the stream. This is different to connecting to the cameras directly, and you shouldn't need to.

Depending on the NVR, if you connect the cameras directly to it, the IP of the camera will be a different IP range to your local network. For example, if you local network is 192.168.1.x then your NVR ports will be 192.168.254.x. Again, depending on the NVR, it should have a "virtual host" option whereby the NVR will route connections directly to the camera through it's own IP address/port.
 

bardel

Well-known Member
So if the nvr supports the proxying of the camera feeds then you shouldn’t need to put the camera on the same network as you suggest. So as long as the nvr is attached to the 192.168.x.x network, and it is able to communicate with the cameras in the 10.x.x.x network, then i would have thought its just a case of enabling the feature and determining the correct url.

best of luck
 

Trending threads

Latest News

High End Munich 2020 Hi-Fi Show cancelled
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Samsung leads global TV market for 14th straight year
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Apple wireless home cinema audio hinted by patent?
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Samsung and BT deliver UK’s first live 8K sports broadcast
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Bowers & Wilkins confirms corporate changes
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Top Bottom