Any of you clever folk help? Screen baring jammed

Grangey.

Member
Hi all,

Wonder if any of you clever people can help.

My trusty projector screen has failed, and having taken it apart confirmed it’s not the motor, but the bearing or bracket the opposite side of the screen attaches to, has jammed/seized.

I’m fine with electrical stuff, but oblivious when it comes to bearing/connection type things. I can’t seem to work out how to take this apart to even consider repairing it.

I’ve tried gently prying at the plastic part with a screwdriver to try to see if it comes away- it doesn’t, and tried giving the connection a good pull to see if I can make it come away- again, no.

Hoping one of you lot might be able to give me some advise, it’s a great screen so don’t want to replace it if I don’t have to..

Mods: Posted here instead of the PJ forum as my query is more about how this particular connection might be made/come apart, rather than specific PJ screen advise.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Doug the D

Member
Can you get a thin flat-bladed screwdriver into this area? if you can get it in far enough and rotate it, you should be able to force the black plastic part off of the splined spindle it's pushed onto - you might need to pull with some force as you twist the screwdriver. It looks like the brass part is the 'male' side of this, inserted into the 'female' part which looks like the rotating part/ bearing.

Once you have that removed, you might have to put some more photos up.
 

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Grangey.

Member
Thank you! That was all the feedback I needed. Screwdriver didn’t do it but a few whacks with a hammer did.

Here’s what I’m left with, am I right in thinking this is basically a broken baring? If so, where and how would I go about replacing it?

Thanks!
 

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shotokan101

Distinguished Member
Yes that's definitely a needle roller bearing - does the shaft tirn eadily now it's freed from the bearing?

What's the make/model of the screen?

Spare parts may be available from manufacturer but if it's judt that bearing that's knackered you should be able to get a replacement but you may also need to purchade a small bearing puller tool to remove that one.

Jim
 

Doug the D

Member
@Grangey. if you look inside the bearing, you'll notice that there are some needles missing - they have been dislodged and have fallen out (the 3rd photo shows some clearly on the metal bracket). I wouldn't imagine you'll be able to rebuild this bearing and you'll possibly be missing some of the needles anyway. You could give it a try, but I'm not a sure if there should be an internal lining to hold the needles in place. There probably was one when new and if made from plastic, it's possibly worn away, allowing the needles to dislodge and fall out.

as @shotokan101 has said, ideally you need to completely replace the bearing, although if you don't have any information on the manufacturer, it might mean you have to get creative with a solution! Good luck :)
 

Rog69

Distinguished Member
You can see the bearing part number stamped on the side of it, HK1210. It shouldn't be too hard to track one of those down online and will probably only cost pocket change, loads on Ebay - Clicky
Double check the dimensions before ordering though.

It is probably just pressed into the bracket, is there a hole on the other side that you could poke something through, like a punch or a screwdriver to tap the old one out with a hammer? To press the new one in you could use a vice or a clamp, don't hammer it in though.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
It’s common to have to press bearings in and out because they are such tight fits.

What does it look like from the other end, is there anything to push against.

Any chance of a photo from the other end of the bearing.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

shotokan101

Distinguished Member

Grangey.

Member
Hi all,

Thanks so much for the useful feedback, does appear to be a diy fix is needed!

The bearing isn’t accessible from the other side sadly as what its held with is bonded to a metal plate.

The only other thing I’ve spotted is there seems to be something just behind the bearing, a star shaped holder. This doesn’t seem to serve a purpose per say but I wonder why it’s there.
Here’s some up close pics for what it’s worth:
 

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Rog69

Distinguished Member
You can get puller tools to remover bearings fitted like this, if you search for inner bearing puller / extractor you should be able to find something suitable :smashin:
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Just read your post again and noticed you say that there is something behind the bearing. This could be a circlip of some sort. What does it look like from the otherside.

If you truly can only access the bearing from one side then it will need to be pulled out rather than pressed. You would need a bearing puller but I’m not sure you will find one small enough. Pressing is a lot easier and you can often cobble something together with bits around the house or garage.

I’m wondering whether the star-shaped part is a circlip that you remove from the other side, then you can press the bearing out from the side in your photo.

A photo off the other side would help.

Cheers,

Nigel
 
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shotokan101

Distinguished Member
Looks lik metal weld to me - you could simply drill through the end plate using the bearing as a guide and push out from other side and seal over after new bearing is fitted

You haven't said whether the spindle rotates freely now it's extracted from bearing?

Jim
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Looks lik metal weld to me - you could simply drill through the end plate using the bearing as a guide and push out from other side and seal over after new bearing is fitted
Or just some glue - I can’t imagine you would weld a bearing in place - too much chance of damaging the bearing with the excessive heat. You’d certainly burn off all the grease packed into it.

If it is weld, then maybe just part of the structure, done before the bearing is pressed into place.

If you can see either the bearing inner or outer from the other side you might be able to punch it out.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

Grangey.

Member
Well gents, got myself what I thought was an internal bearing puller. Might have ordered the wrong one, since this doesn’t come with any kind of weighted slider. Improvised my own using a 2.5kg weight plate I had.
Held down with over 50kg on a tressell leg, countless upward pulls showed no movement what so ever..

So now I’m frustrated. Ordered a different kind of internal puller but won’t be here for another week and it feels like being mocked.

Any other ways of getting this little bugger out in the mean time? Presumably drilling isn’t wise..
 

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shotokan101

Distinguished Member
Looks lik metal weld to me - you could simply drill through the end plate using the bearing as a guide and push out from other side and seal over after new bearing is fitted

You haven't said whether the spindle rotates freely now it's extracted from bearing?

Jim
See above - once hole is drilled - enlarge to wider than the bearing centre size - then drift out with piece if wood and hammer
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
See above - once hole is drilled - enlarge to wider than the bearing centre size - then drift out with piece if wood and hammer
Agree - keep asking to see the other side but the OP seems determined not to show us - much easier to press/drift out then pull out.

Though rather than using a hammer I would be looking at using a G-Clamp.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
In fact this is what I would look to try and do.

84FBD272-D4EF-44B7-9518-5F9D7E16BDF8.jpeg


Apologies for the amateur drawing.

It does rely on being able to get a bolt in from the other side and that depends on how much that weld is blocking access.

But assuming you can.

Block of wood deeper that the bearing housing plus enough to allow the bearing to come out with a hole just wider than the bearing housing..

Long bolt through the other end.

Big penny washer, bigger than hole in wood.

Nut on screw. Tighten nut and it will pull the bearing out.

Cheers,

Nigel
 
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shotokan101

Distinguished Member
Agree - keep asking to see the other side but the OP seems determined not to show us - much easier to press/drift out then pull out.

Though rather than using a hammer I would be looking at using a G-Clamp.

Cheers,

Nigel
...hope that doesn't rely on finding the G-Spot...... <gets coat and leaves>
 

Grangey.

Member
Hi guys!

WOW the input you’ve given is incredible, thank you so much!

So after my last post, I decided to buy a “proper” internal bearing remover with a proper weight attachment hoping this would do it. The last kit just didn’t feel right.

New kit came today.. didn’t work. But for the first time in full daylight, I saw the now bigger issue. The bearing isn’t just standing alone in its shaft. The shaft appears to be formed to provide a seating for it. So there is no “lip” available underneath for any pulling tool to attach to.. or if I was to gain access for the other side, means to pull it through... see pics which I hope show this abit better.

In short the damage to the bearing inners caused by the pulling tools allowed me to completely remove it. This gave me abit of a lip to give it one last try.... as you can see, no joy.

So am I out of options? If I found an engineering/fabrication co could they potentially drill this out but leaving the seat etc untouched?

For those asking to see the other side I’m not sure what you mean? If you mean of the plate, it’s completely blank/flat cover. If you mean what feeds into the bearing- ie the screen, this looks just as you’d expect.. pics attached of both- but let me know if I’ve misunderstood anything...
 

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nheather

Distinguished Member
You might need to respray it black afterwards but I guess the last thing to try is freezing it or heating it.

What you are hoping for is that the bearing will contract more in the cold or expand less in the heat than the housing and will pull out more easily.

I suspect that heating stands more chance which is why I said that you may need to respray it black afterwards.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

Rog69

Distinguished Member
I think that it is likely that the bearing has been glued in with Locktite retaining compound or similar, if it was just pressed in there I think the puller would have removed with the effort you have put in. That stuff can be a bugger, but heating it will help, the hotter you can get it the better. If you can borrow a heat gun try getting it as hot as you can with that and then use the puller on it while it is still hot.
 

Doug the D

Member
Personally, I think that will drill out now. If you keep upping the size of drill bit, eventually the bearing housing will just collapse as you drill. If you have a vice, I'd advise holding the plate in that. Eye protection is an absolute must.

Edit: @Grangey. If you want to send it to me, I'm happy to try and sort it and send back - might be cheaper than an engineering company?
 

Grangey.

Member
As it happens you read my mind. Decided instead of wasting more money on tools I don’t have, I’d pop to a metal fabricator and see what they say.

10 minutes, a few swear words, and £10 later, and it’s sorted! He drilled it out and pressed the new one in for me.

Another circumstance where I thought the diy route would be cheaper and easier to be proved wrong!

The fabricator did say it’s a really crap construction but sees why for it’s use case, and think I struggled as when the bearing failed the heat generated from the screen still trying to rotate probably caused it to “jam” more into the space. The new bearing isn’t as tightly in there as the last that’s for sure! But it’s got nowhere to go so won’t be a problem.

Sincere thanks to all of you in your assistance trying to sort this! Going to reassemble the screen this evening so fingers crossed this is the end of the saga!
 

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Doug the D

Member
Glad it's sorted at long last :)
 

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