Any BT engineers here? Wiring query re broadband speeds

sbriggs

Well-known Member
If you can send lots of photos including the master socket taken apart you will get a solution .

though some elements of cabling is indeed rocket science this isn’t
 

safcalibur

Distinguished Member
Mention the what?



*runs away!
 

Sam66

Standard Member
If there is no crackling on a telephone handset plugged into the master socket (with faceplate removed).

Just ring BT and ask them to do a line test. Also check there is no speed restriction on the line. If the electrician had it disconnected or shorted for a while then it's not unusual for the line speed to be dropped automatically to try to improve the connection.
 

Coulson

Distinguished Member
If there is no crackling on a telephone handset plugged into the master socket (with faceplate removed).

Just ring BT and ask them to do a line test. Also check there is no speed restriction on the line. If the electrician had it disconnected or shorted for a while then it's not unusual for the line speed to be dropped automatically to try to improve the connection.
Doesn't it have to be disconnected for a certain amount of time?
 

miket99

Novice Member
if BT think you are at fault by moving socket its a £85 charge

I had then in on my broadband fault yesterday and they told me if it was my side of the network I would be charged
 

R10DAN

Standard Member
If it's the Master socket, the incoming wires should br crimped into the back plate (master sockets have a half size outer plate, and an inner/back plate, which is the size of the box). The wires should be crimped into 3 and 5. The sparky may not have inserted these wires correctly (probably used a screwdriver) and is creating high resistance which could effect the speed. Also, the wires could possibly be reversed, but not sure what effect this would have.
If the sparky just cut the extra wire instead of trimming each strand, he could have created a short, which could possibly have effected the kit in the BT exchange.
Never worked in this exact field, but have experienced similar issues.
 

The Dark Horse

Well-known Member
Finally an update to this, speeds have increased again, not as quick as they were but still over 40. I have no idea what happened, I'm wondering if by cutting the wire it triggered some sort of fault on the line and it automatically capped or dropped the speed? Then over a period of time it stabilised itself and the speeds went back up, could that be an explanation?
 

sergiup

Distinguished Member
Extremely unlikely. Look, I don't like being short, but you've already been given a lot of valid and decent advice. If you follow it and still have issues then it may be something else worth investigating.
 

The Dark Horse

Well-known Member
Extremely unlikely. Look, I don't like being short, but you've already been given a lot of valid and decent advice. If you follow it and still have issues then it may be something else worth investigating.

Eh? I said speeds have increased and wondered if a cap had previously been added by BT when wires cut, I'm not asking for more advice, just posed a question and updated my post thats all.
 
Last edited:

Bubblin

Well-known Member
No a cap will not be put on due to the shorting of the wires, typically engineers use the shorting method when tracing cables using a tone and tap method, at worst this knock the card offline for seconds before a connection is re established.

As before, issues it could be

Faulty faceplate
Disconnected wire
Broken or high resistant joint
Filter faulty or damaged

By playing about with the box, you may have just moved the cable enough to provide a decent enough connection again,

Honestly just pay a local ex bt engineer £50 to come round and reterminate, or give your phone provider a call and hope they can fix for free, then you'll have years of stable broadband connection again.
 

sbriggs

Well-known Member
Or just send us some photos and between us we can probably tell if it will be stable or need looking at and reterminating
 

The Dark Horse

Well-known Member
No a cap will not be put on due to the shorting of the wires, typically engineers use the shorting method when tracing cables using a tone and tap method, at worst this knock the card offline for seconds before a connection is re established.

As before, issues it could be

Faulty faceplate
Disconnected wire
Broken or high resistant joint
Filter faulty or damaged

By playing about with the box, you may have just moved the cable enough to provide a decent enough connection again,

Honestly just pay a local ex bt engineer £50 to come round and reterminate, or give your phone provider a call and hope they can fix for free, then you'll have years of stable broadband connection again.

Thank you, I think I’ll just leave it now to be honest, almost back to previous normal speeds and over the BT minimum speed guarantee so I guess they won’t do anything even if we argued it has dropped slightly.
 

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