Another what should I buy thread.

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by scw, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. scw

    scw
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    212
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    Hi

    I’ve posted on here for advice before, but am still trying to make up my mind regards buying a PJ.

    Whichever projector I buy needs to be dual purpose. It will be used for watching widescreen movies, but will also to double as a computer screen for showing clients photographs.

    At the moment the PC is traditional 4X3 format, but may be changed to widescreen in the not to distant future.

    Above everything else I need good quality as well as colour matching.

    So any ideas what I should go for? I guess the budget is around £1500. Like everyone else I like a deal but I like quality too and the PJ must good for both functions.

    It will literally be unplugged from the film room and plugged into the study when required.

    I very much like the images from the Optoma 72 posted by Skylab here http://www.avforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=349995 and he makes comment that it works good with a PC feed. However, I know nothing about PJ’s and wonder whether another brand/model would be better suited to my needs.

    What should I audition?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2001
    Messages:
    14,087
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    UK.
    Ratings:
    +3,490
    I think all projectors take a PC fed in one way or another (VGA and/or DVI), so that shouldn't be a problem, but most need tweaking for true colour accuracy if that's important to you. Getting a pj calibrated to D65 will ensure this accuracy, but you will need to get a demo to see if the out of the box settings are going to be good enough for you be happy with and save you the cost of getting it done professionaly.

    Infocus used to ensure that their projectors were close to D65, but I don't know if their newer models are the same as their Screenplay range used to be in that respect.

    There is a cheapish colour calibration tool called SpyderPro IIRC that will help get your colours accurate in a semi automatic fashion and it changes the colour profile in the graphics card, so that might be OK for getting the colours to look right, but it's better to change the settings in the pj to maximise the colour range (it may or not work perfectly as it is though)

    Photos on here don't give the whole picture because the camera can change the appearance of colours and black level, so they aren't always 100% indicative of what things will look like up close in real life so to speak.

    You should try and demo a few different models to see whcih one(s) fit your requirements. A 4:3 pj with a 16:9 mode may better suited so that you can show your pics larger for the clients, but they tend to be designed for presentations more than video, so the colours may be less accurate and the video processing will not be as good either for movies.

    I would try to demo as many machines as possible to get a feel of what is out there so you can see what is acceptable for your needs.

    Gary
     
  3. scw

    scw
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    212
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    Thanks Gary

    I think as I will be going over to widescreen format on the PC before to much longer I may be better to get a dedicated widescreen PJ which allows me to switchback to 4X3 in the short term.

    The Spyder calibration tools look good and I have been thinking of getting one of those to colour balance the PC screen. I think the Pro version also allows it to be used on a PJ, although I guess, having thought about it, the colours are not 100 percent critical on the PJ output as I wont be printing from it. They just need to be somewhere near.
     

Share This Page

Loading...