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Amplifier- Speaker matching?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by nsb, Nov 27, 2003.

  1. nsb

    nsb
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    Is it important to match the amplifier output to the impedence of the speakers?
    Unlike hi fi speakers which are all the same, 8 ohms, there seems to be a range between 4 and 16 for satellite speakers, and amplifiers give their output to a specific resistance - none of these seem to match properly. Does this matter?!
     
  2. buns

    buns
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    hifi speakers are not all the same..... mine are 4 ohm and are alot more hifi than those most would use!

    If you have a cheap amp, more than 8 ohm speakers is good, med amp, more than 4 ohm and good you can get what you like.

    So in essence you select really based on common sense...... a £200 amp will NOT be happy running a load of 4 ohm speakers. But it will be most likely just fine with 8 ohms

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  3. Reiner

    Reiner
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    You should follow the manufactures advise and match accordingly but it's possible to bent the rules, in particular if you are talking about rears or when all speakers run as SMALL. Then even 4 Ohm speakers should not pose a problem to an amp rated at 8-16 Ohm (or 6-8 Ohm or whatever).
    Most manufacturers play save and say you can't use 4 Ohm speakers, which can be tricky loads for amps with a small power supply like budget AV receivers.
    Well, if they are not "monster" speakers and you keep it at normal levels it shouldn't be a problem though.
    Some amps even have an impedance switch and most if not all amps have an overload protection circuit. Try at your own risk though.
     

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