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Amp output versus speaker output

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by Pip_UK, Jan 24, 2002.

  1. Pip_UK

    Pip_UK
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    My new AV speakers will output 75w per channel and the amp I was looking at outputs 100w per channel. I prefer the design and specs of the next model up but this outputs 130w per channel. Would this be a waste of money using these speakers?

    The speakers in question are Mission's FS2-AV NXT flat panel

    The amps in question are the JVC RX-8012R and RX-DP10R

    Any info on these two amps would be greatly appreciated.

    Cheers,

    Pip
     
  2. Lowrider

    Lowrider
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    The rating of the speakers means maximum power they will handle without clipping, usually there is no problem using an amplifier with more power, on the contrary, less power will clip (distort) earlier and possibly destroy the tweeters, but I would be careful with the listening levels...
     
  3. LV426

    LV426
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    As lowrider says, it is generally better to have an amp with more power than the rating of the speakers.

    Reason: If you turn the volume up beyond the ability of the speakers to handle (ie overdrive your speakers), they will quickly begin to sound very nasty, so you are very likely to turn the volume down before any harm is done.

    However, if you have speakers with a high power rating, and you turn the volume up beyond what your amplifier can handle (ie you overdrive the amplifier), this will result in much more subtle changes to the sound which you may not immediately hear. But the signal from the amp will, in these circumstances, contain a large amount of high frequency energy which can destroy your tweeters. Often, the first real warning of this is when one of your speakers begins to sound muffled, by which time, the tweeter is dead and you have an expensive repair bill.
     

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