Amazon order! what do you think?

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by 47degrees, Jul 13, 2018.

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  1. 47degrees

    47degrees
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    hi all, posted on here and learnt a lot over the last week or two so thanks, im now ready to get bits ordered from amazon (might wait till prime day to see if any prices drop) please can anyone experienced look at this and see if its fit for purpose

    for those not read my other threads here is the important info
    - bought a house, having it rewired with Cat6, 21 cables in total running back to understairs cupboard
    - no online gaming just heavy youtube and streaming (non4k)
    - house is brick wall diveiders, 3 bed detached, 70ft garden
    - will be running virgin 350mb when i move in

    *** i will be getting 2 of the ubiquiti AP's

    please let me know your thoughts on the equipment list? any better versions of these you would recommend? anything i am missing?

    upload_2018-7-13_12-1-53.png
     
  2. 47degrees

    47degrees
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    the cat6 cable itself will be purchased through the electrician, i have checked it is not CCA and will be genuine cat6
     
  3. Maverick567

    Maverick567
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    I'm not sure how your wiring up your house but have you considered two Wi-Fi access points? The ubiquity stuff is really good. I would possibly have one in both the upstairs and downstairs hallway, at least then you are future proof if your Wi-Fi requirements increase. Ethernet is by far the best option but certain items such as CCTV cams, smart assistants, basic Chromecasts all use Wi-Fi.
     
  4. 47degrees

    47degrees
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    HI BUD, yeah i put in the first post "*** i will be getting 2 of the ubiquiti AP's" :)
     
  5. mickevh

    mickevh
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    I'm not sure you'd need SSTP patch-cords unless either the patch panel or your switch is earthed. But I doubt it'll hurt either.

    No faceplates and modules are cited - if you want a cat6 install, they will need be cat6 too.

    Strictly speaking, your install won't be "cat" anything unless it's tested with the (very expensive) test equipment needed to certify the install: There's more to it than buying cat6 bits and bobs, though of course they are necessary if one wants a cat6 install. For example, IIRC, cat6 requires all the cable runs to be installed into "proper" containment and not just tacked to the walls and plastered over; there's rules about "laying" in the cable and not "pulling" it, yada, yada, yada.

    That said, you'd have to do a spectacularly bad job for 10/100/1000 ethernet to not work - it's well with the performance headroom of cat5e and higher.

    Personally, I wouldn't bother with cat6: cat5e is more than good enough for Gigabit ethenet out to 100m (sometimes even further) and 10G will (should) work to a shorter distance. HDMI would be a different story. But it's your dime. Ethernet won't work any "better" because you give it cat6, but it won't work any "worse" either.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
  6. mickevh

    mickevh
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    For the best performance (speed) it is preferable to locate Wi-Fi AP's "where the users are" and not out in hallways. With the AP's in hallways, every single transmission to/from a Wi-Fi AP (it's two way radio like walkie-talkies, not one way radio like television) has to pass through at least one wall. If you instead (for example) sited one in the lounge one in the master bedroom, then those two locales get "line of sight" transmission (thus the best) and the adjacent rooms (dining room, kitchen, kids bedrooms, etc.) are no worse off (through one wall.)

    Of course, exact layout of the property may dictate otherwise, but it's food for thought when planning Wi-Fi optimum depolyment.
     
  7. Maverick567

    Maverick567
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    Fair point!!
     
  8. Kamakazie

    Kamakazie
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    Have you thought about a switch with POE or will you use individual injectors of you need it?

    A switch with some POE ports would at least mean you can just run cat cables to the access points.
     
  9. Maverick567

    Maverick567
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    This is something I would definatley recommend, I didn't do this and regret it now, the minimum number of 13amp plugs in your cabinet the better!
     
  10. ChuckMountain

    ChuckMountain
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    Yes agree with that too, and there a few fanless ones, just check the particular AP can take them as a few of the lower range one in Unifi use a slightly different standard...
     
  11. 47degrees

    47degrees
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    Thanks for this guys, i hadnt even thought about POE, looking at the 24 port POE switched they are 3 times the price of the unmanaged non-POE switch listed above, so aside from being neater at the other end (no power cable feeding the AP, CCTV etc) are there any major benefits for this application? its still a home network remember, no online gaming, just streaming (not4K) potentially 4 CCTV cameras and youtube usage, i want the network to be the best it can be BUT my budget on this house has gone crazy and i simply cannot afford half of what needs to be done, so cutting costs here and there is needed lol

    cheers
     
  12. blicky_1

    blicky_1
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    I am just in the planning stage (and no expert!) for doing something very similar to you and looked at PoE switches, like you say they are 3x the price and in a home network I'm sure they would be a 'nice to have' but not essential (could always upgrade at a later date if needed anyway)

    My CCTV cameras (Hikvision) will run through the patch panel but will then divert straight to the NVR as it has onboard PoE, so missing the switch altogether and less stress on the network (hopping onto the network after the NVR but this is only when logged in/viewing)

    The only other item I have is a work IP phone (that can do PoE) but that can stay on the power adapter it already has as it's in the Study and next to a power socket. If anything else needed it I would just use a PoE injector as i'm sure I would never need 24 PoE ports anyway!

    Btw some of my existing network is Cat5e (gigabit switch) so I am sticking with it and not going the Cat6 route.
     
  13. mickevh

    mickevh
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    POE versus non-POE makes no difference to the networking performance - if it's a Gigabit switch, it's a Gigabit whether it does or doesn't offer POE. (Gigabit AKA 10/100/1000.)

    Back in the day one would trawl switch specs to examine the performance of the switching backplane when comparing one switch with another - some simply had more capacity than others. These days it's much more prevalent for switches to be able to service all ports at maximum capacity (it used to be called "wirespeed" in the marketing blurb) so you don't need to worry about it so much.

    Your average SOHO LAN is unlikely to get close to generating enough traffic to stress out a modern Gigabit ethernet switch - it's to sort of thing you only really need to worry about if your building high capacity enterprise style switching infrastructure in data centres, network carriers and so forth. You don't need to expend much emotional capital worrying about whether switches X or Y can "handle" 4K TV etc. Relative to Gigabit ethernet, even 4K is relatively low bandwidth.

    For a SOHO, I suggest a bigger selection consideration is likely to be fan cooled versus fanless design. Fan cooled switches can be surprisingly loud, (vendors used to laugh at me when I asked for acoustic noise figures!)

    The advantage of a POE switch is that you don't have to provide power to devices by other means. That might save some cost (say for some POE injectors) or convenience and aesthetics, for example, you only need to string up a UTP to your Wi-Fi AP's instead of UTP plus power. Whether that's an issue or not is a value judgement.

    When sizing POE switches, you do need to plan for the power budget: Don't "just assume" that a POE switch is capable of supplying 15/30watts power to all ports. For example, some of the first POE switches I bought only have a power budget of about 100watts which meant they could only drive 6 ports at about 15watts, or 10 ports at (about) 10 watts, etc. etc. Some POE switches have tools to allow you to manage and monitor the POE allocation/usage per port. It's also worth noting that a lot of devices draw more power when powering up than when in continuous operation. Some POE switches have "coping" mechanisms for this by initialising the power on a port by port (or group of ports) to gradually spin up the attached devices.Of course, if you're only talking about a small number of devices, you probably won't have to worry about such things.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
  14. ChuckMountain

    ChuckMountain
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    I have a PoE 24 port switch that is loud, replaced with quieter fans which is better and temps are still ok.

    I would possibly look at an 8 port PoE switch plus another one as half way house solution depending on the number of of PoE devices you have\plan to have.
     
  15. ChuckMountain

    ChuckMountain
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    One NVR that my parents used even though it was PoE couldn't produce enough juice for all the cameras to work consistently. They would drop off, replacing it with a netgear 8 port PoE switch solved the problem in this case.
     
  16. Kamakazie

    Kamakazie
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    Some great info above.
    I'd agree that if budget is tight, looking at a supplementary POE switch (4 / 8 port) or ad-hoc injectors would be a cheaper solution. POE certainly isn't required, but for things like cameras & APs I think it is a much neater solution considering they are likely to be ceiling mounted or high on walls.
     
  17. blicky_1

    blicky_1
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    @47degrees did you get yours done? mine is near finished with just the cabinet to install at the weekend (cabling ready to connect) would be interested to see your results!
     
  18. blicky_1

    blicky_1
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    Just about finished mine this weekend after moving the Virgin cabling and going live with the system (ignore the camera on top it's going to be moved) no faults or cable problems so far, very pleased with it: -

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Glad I went with the 9U (450mm deep) as it gives a bit of space for extras in the future, total cost was around £300 for everything and a few weekends work!
     
  19. mickevh

    mickevh
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    That's very neat. I cannot quite see from the photos, but is the cable management some "brush plate" type thing...?

    You might care to record which port on the patch panel goes where for posterity. "In the business" we sometimes record such information in spreadsheets and or scribble it down on a book/sheet retained in the cabinet.

    [ANECDOTE] One of my favourite uses for "old stuff left in the comms cabinet" was in my last job where one of my tekkies used to leave an old mobile phone in a couple of the dingiest cabs so he'd always got a "torch" on hand if he'd forgotten to bring one with him! [/ANECDOTE]
     
  20. blicky_1

    blicky_1
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    Thanks @mickevh, yes I went for the brush plates as it made it look neater either side of the switch, I have recorded everything on notes and all cables are colour coded to which area they go to etc.

    Was fun to do to be honest and not something I have done before so i'm pleased with the results.
     

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