• New Patreon Tier and Early Access Content available. If you would like to support AVForums, we now have a new Patreon Tier which gives you access to selected news, reviews and articles before they are available to the public. Read more.

Amazon Dispute - after some advice

paul cliff

Active Member
Hi All,

Need some advice here.

I'm trying to return a faulty item to Amazon. Yesterday I was told via live chat that a courier had been arranged for today, then, last night I had an email saying that they couldn't organise it because of 'technical problems' and I should post the item myself then contact them for a refund.

The item is fairly large so I don't really want to lug it down to the post office and don't really have the time to be honest.

Anyway, I went back on live chat today and asked them to do the collection again, I was told the same thing, they cant because the option is 'not available'. After some back and forth they agreed to refund my money and told me to post the item, then seek reimbursement. I contacted Amazon customer service by email explaining that I want the item collected (like they've done many times before), I also highlighted that the item has caused damage to a door and door frame in my house which will need repainting. I offered to overlook this and not seek compensation if they could organise the collection and perhaps offer me something as a good will gesture. They've emailed back refusing to organise a collection and offering me £5 for the 'inconvenience'.

I've just emailed back explaining that its completely ridiculous that they aren't able to organise a collection, and an offer of £5 to cover the cost of re-painting a door and frame is laughable.

Questions:

1. Am I being unreasonable here?

2. Do they legally have to organise the courier or can they insist that they just refund me the postage back here? (the item was faulty remember)

The whole thing has seriously put me off Amazon, I pretty much use them exclusively for my online shopping (I'm a Prime customer also) because they have such an easy and usually stress-free returns process.

Sorry if this is a bit of a rant, they've got my back up today. :(
 

IronGiant

Moderator
How did it damage your door and frame? :confused:

PS from what you've said the £5 is for the inconvenience of you having to go to the PO, not to repair the damage.
 
Last edited:

Naaktgeboren

Distinguished Member
The item can't have caused damage, its a box which you move.. it either fits through a door or it doesn't and is your responsibility to ensure it's done properly.

I'm guessing the product contains a certain type of battery which is not suitable for the courier. They've offered you a fiver AND told you they will reimburse your postage costs.

I have no idea why you feel this is unreasonable!!
 

Miss Mandy

Moderator
I can't see anything wrong with Amazon's offer/suggestion. It's not unusual or unreasonable to have to post an item back yourself and get the postage refunded afterwards. Also as Naak says sometimes there genuinely are issues with couriers who won't take certain items or whatever.
It's very unusual for an item to door damage to something else, the most common reason for that is operator error.
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
The item can't have caused damage, its a box which you move.. it either fits through a door or it doesn't and is your responsibility to ensure it's done properly.

So, OP is lying?

FWIW I've seen our postie mash stuff through our letterbox. Stuff that obviously wouldn't fit. But he has forced it in, fortunately nothing was damaged.
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
So, OP is lying?

FWIW I've seen our postie mash stuff through our letterbox. Stuff that obviously wouldn't fit. But he has forced it in, fortunately nothing was damaged.
If that's the scenario, then the damage is Royal Mail/courier's fault. Not Amazon's.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
If it's Amazon Logistics, isn't it Amazon's fault? but I doubt that's when the damage occurred.
 

Naaktgeboren

Distinguished Member
So, OP is lying?

FWIW I've seen our postie mash stuff through our letterbox. Stuff that obviously wouldn't fit. But he has forced it in, fortunately nothing was damaged.

No, what I mean is Amazon fulfil their contract upon shipping, the courier is then responsible for delivery from A-B. Either way, its up to the home owner to use their common sense when accepting the parcel, its not hard to look at the box to determine whether or not it will fit through the front door.

If the OP wants to blame someone for damage, if it's not his own fault, it's the courier. Not sure why he's expecting Amazon to pay out for damage.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
It's clear from the OP it's a faulty item that has damaged a door and door frame "in his house", nowhere is the delivery driver mentioned.
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
It's clear from the OP it's a faulty item that has damaged his door and door frame. Nowhere does he say it was due to a careless delivery driver.
Unless Amazon was the manufacturer of the unknown item, then surely he'd need to contact the manufacturer for compensation. Not Amazon.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
Unless Amazon was the manufacturer of the unknown item, then surely he'd need to contact the manufacturer for compensation. Not Amazon.

My point is, it's unlikely to be delivery related :)
 

paul cliff

Active Member
My point is, it's unlikely to be delivery related :)

It wasn't delivery related, the item is a thing that fits to a door frame to stop fingers being caught in it, when I've removed it to send back (didn't notice the damage until after I fitted it :facepalm:) its stripped some of the paintwork and left a very stubborn sticky mess all over the door and frame. Ok arguably this was a risk I was prepared to take when sticking it on, but command strips also stick to the wall and I've never had problems removing them. Anyway, the damage is another argument altogether, I was pretty much willing to let it go until they pissed me off.

Here's the result:

I've had a 3rd email clearly from someone more intelligent, they have kindly explained that Amazon has had a change of policy and no longer will be offering to collect customer returns for any orders (apparently). So they've refunded me and told me to throw the item away.

I'm not seriously going to pursue any compensation for the door, I'll accept it as a lesson learnt and move on.

Suits me.

Oh, and the reason I didn't organise a courier is: frankly, why should I? And Amazon had sent me an email saying that they would only refund up to £4.25 o_O

It wasn't made clear until a later email that they would have refunded me for any amount.
 

Derek S-H

Distinguished Member
Oh, I really was hoping it would be some kind of sex swing after all, how disappointing!

I'll admit that sometimes you can end up longer on the phone explaining something repeatedly when it really should be fairly straightforward, but at least they're the ones that call you.

In fact, Amazon are one of the best e-tailers out there regarding customer service, there are a lot worse (just check out the Ebay/Paypal Thread on here for confirmation of this). Is this your first bad experience with them? If so, is it really worth throwing the baby out with the bathwater because of it?

I'm not saying you're wrong to be cross with them, I'm just saying maybe take a step back, a deep breath and re-evaluate just what kind of service you receive from them overall?
 
Last edited:

paul cliff

Active Member
Oh, I really was hoping it would be some kind of sex swing after all, how disappointing!

I'll admit that sometimes you can end up longer on the phone explaining something repeatedly when it really should be fairly straightforward, but at least they're the ones that call you.

In fact, Amazon are one of the best e-tailers out there regarding customer service, there are a lot worse (just check out the Ebay/Paypal Thread on here for confirmation of this). Is this your first bad experience with them? If so, is it really worth throwing the baby out with the bathwater because of it?

I'm not saying you're wrong to be cross with them, I'm just saying maybe take a step back, a deep breath and re-evaluate just what kind of service you receive from them overall?

Sound advice, thank you.

The sex swing is in another order, hopefully it arrives safely XD
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
No, what I mean is Amazon fulfil their contract upon shipping, the courier is then responsible for delivery from A-B. Either way, its up to the home owner to use their common sense when accepting the parcel, its not hard to look at the box to determine whether or not it will fit through the front door.

A moot point now, but do you go outside and inspect every package before the postie pops it through your letterbox?
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
Just to be clear, it's your responsibility to return the item, not Amazon's responsibility to collect it.
I want to return something bought online
You are responsible for returning the items within 14 calendar days of cancelling and refunds must be paid within 14 calendar days after returning the goods, or evidence that they were returned.

The only difference if the item is faulty is the time scale & the cost of the return is covered by them.
Any terms and conditions that say you must cover the cost of returning an item don't apply where the goods being returned are faulty.
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
(didn't notice the damage until after I fitted it :facepalm:) its stripped some of the paintwork and left a very stubborn sticky mess all over the door and frame. Ok arguably this was a risk I was prepared to take when sticking it on, but command strips also stick to the wall and I've never had problems removing them. Anyway, the damage is another argument altogether, I was pretty much willing to let it go until they pissed me off.

I'm assuming your walls aren't painted with gloss paint, it can be a pain to remove anything off glosswork without messing up the paint.

I'd say Amazon have gone above and beyond in this instance. Considering you are the one who buggered it up :)
 

Naaktgeboren

Distinguished Member
A moot point now, but do you go outside and inspect every package before the postie pops it through your letterbox?

If it fits through the letter box it won't have caused damage, can honestly say in my 41 years I've never seen an instance of damage by this method.
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
If it fits through the letter box it won't have caused damage, can honestly say in my 41 years I've never seen an instance of damage by this method.

Yes, but when you said: "Either way, its up to the home owner to use their common sense when accepting the parcel, its not hard to look at the box to determine whether or not it will fit through the front door." How do you do this? How do you 'accept' a parcel? None of this is up to the homeowner, unless they stand guard outside and inspect every package before the postie pops it through the letterbox. Do you use one of those measuring templates on each package?
 

The latest video from AVForums

Guardians of the Galaxy Xmas Special, Strange World, Bones and All, and Cabinet of Dr Caligari in 4K
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom