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Am I jumping the gun?

Discussion in 'TVs' started by gilesm, Nov 24, 2004.

  1. gilesm

    gilesm
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    I've just orderedd a Loewe Spheros 37 HD+ LCD TV. I thought I'd got my head round the HD issues having spoken at length with my hifi shop, but reading a bit more on the web I'm now unsure - in fact totally unsure :confused: .

    The spheros says it is HD ready, but looking at the resolution of the display it's 1378 * 768, that might not be the case? It's certainly ready for 720, but will it be for 1080, I thought for 1080 a screen had to be something like 1920 * 1080 (WXGA?). Anyway talking to the guy in the hifi shop he says that it will be able to display 1080 through it's HDMI interface. Is he talking rubbish? If not will it downscale to the size? and if so will it look awful?

    Finally should I care at the moment about 1080?

    Cheers
     
  2. Dutch

    Dutch
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    gilesm,

    The set will have a built-in scaler to scale all inputs (480i/p, 576i/p, 720p, or 1080i) to the native 1366x768 resolution. It seems reasonable to expect this set to accept 720p and 1080i signals through the HDMI input, or what would be the point of it? :)

    Steve
     
  3. loadsofleads

    loadsofleads
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    Well, Sky HD+ will be with us in 2006 and Blu-Ray is also very likely at the start of 2006, That isn't much more than 14 months away :eek:
    Personally I'm waiting, my Hitachi 5200 is HD compatible for both 720p and 1080i even though it's a 1024/1024 interlaced screen :confused:
    By 2006 1920/1080i/p tv's should be available.
    The Tv your looking at is a good'un, go for it mate :hiya:

    loadsofleads :thumbsup:
     
  4. dsp fan

    dsp fan
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    Giles, to my knowledge apart from some very hi-end displays of projectors/Tv's etc nothing can display 1080p in native format.

    They all upscale or downscale, you could wait as many are doing for true 1080p discplays as opposed to 1080i (interlaced) but if the launch is 2006, then realistically in this country we are going to see nothing really sexy until 2008.

    Blue ray will have its highly priced media for the first year, Sky will be launching a bunch of old films for a while in my opinion so things will take time. Call my a cynic but thats they way it is.

    Ready for the flames but lets face it we will not be leading the Blue Ray pack, and bless Sky for bringing us the technology.
     
  5. welsh113

    welsh113
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    you must remember that 1080p will be at least 2008-2010 and thats if your lucky as we have not even got 720p yet and the americans who are at least 3 years ahead of us are only just starting to adopt 720p!!!! So to say we are going to get 1080p in the next few years is hilariously wrong......we havent got 720p(expected format with sky) yet (2006) they will not just change to 1080p any time soon............and if you buy a display that can handle the 1080p natively then you are going to have to upconvert and that will cause the picture will be worse then the one that them with 720p are getting
     
  6. loadsofleads

    loadsofleads
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    1080p isn't a realistic proposition for Broadcast this decade, but there is a good chance Blu-Ray will adopt that format. If it does it's worth getting a 1920/1080p screen, if they opt for 1080i, then a 1920/1080i screen would be best. Better to wait until we get the full specs from Blu-Ray before making a decision imho.

    loadsofleads :thumbsup:
     
  7. Dutch

    Dutch
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    welsh113,

    The US have had 720p broadcasts from ABC since 1998 - Fox started their 720p broadcasts this year after starting with 480p.

    taffyboyo,

    Both HD DVD and Blu-ray will use native 1080p24 - at least for film-based material. :smashin: Using such codecs as MPEG4 AVC HP, I believe 1080p broadcasts are perfectly feasible during this decade. The US have used terrestrial MPEG2 HD at 19 Mbps since 1998 - 1080p using MPEG4 AVC HP would need only 14-16 Mbps for superb quality pictures.

    Steve
     
  8. welsh113

    welsh113
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    i agree but at the same time anyone in the market now can look at a 720p display and be safe in the knowledge that he is at the forfront of technology and it will be able to handle anything for the next ten years with ease IMHO blueray will be 720p/1080i as is everything in the states right now but then again that is just me saying this
     
  9. Quickbeam

    Quickbeam
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    According to the EBU's paper on HDTV, "Another issue which remains to be explored concerns the extent to which a given progressive input signal can be fully explored in practice by a given flat-panel display. If the three colour primary points are not spatially coincident (as they are not in practice), it may be that to fully exploit a given signal resolution, a higher resolution panel is needed to avoid spatial aliasing effects. In other words, it may be that a 1080p panel is needed in order to fully use the 720p delivery format." So a 720p signal may actually look better on a 1080p display.

    Blu-ray will be 1080p24 for movies; everything else will be 720p/1080i.
     
  10. loadsofleads

    loadsofleads
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    Without trying to look like a knucklehead, what 'else' is there :confused:

    loadsofleads :thumbsup:
     
  11. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
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    What he means is 1080/24 FRAMES per second for material recorded on film cameras or progressively at 24 FRAMES per second.

    Other material would be 25/30/50/60 frames per second progressive PC generated material...or 50/60 interlaced fields per second material recorded on video camera's.

    1080P/24 is surely only the method of recording and storage on that medium. There are very few(any?) devices that will actually display such a signal. I'd expect the decoder in the player to chuck the stuff out at 60Hz interlaced with 2:3 sequencing. Maybe even at 1080 24sfp, but again how many displays will recognise that?

    Gordon
     
  12. Quickbeam

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    Very good question Gordon.

    HDTVs are advertised as accepting 720p/1080i; very rarely do they mention 1080p, or supported frame/field rates. However, 1080p24 is an ATSC standard, and there are at a least few plasmas that will accept a 24p/psf signal (can't remember which ones off the top of my head). Whether compatible displays are able to display 24 frames without frame rate conversion is anyone's guess. From what I can gather the display format will be switchable on next gen players between 1080p/1080i/720p so hopefully there won't be any compatiblity problems.

    Once Blu-ray or its rival HD-DVD hit the shops I expect to see more displays advertised as supporting smooth 24 frame playback.
     
  13. Agent 86

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    ok - here is my 2 cents worth: Firstly, if a 1080 screen potentially displays 720p better, surely it would have to scale the 720p picture to fit the screen? Would this scaling compromise the benefits?

    With respect to which resolution Sky will provide, I like to think of it from a different direction. The Astra satellites support both 720p and 1080i and both MPEG2 and MPEG4. So what if, on the Sky digital platform, Sky Sports decided on 720p and Discovery or Disney for example decided on 1080i? The answer is that the set top box has to support both 702p and 1080i and also MPEG2 and MPEG4. Given that the set top box is able to support both reoslutions, what is stopping Sky broadcasting sport at 720p and movies and entertainment at 1080i?

    That's where my money lies, on Sky broadcasting both resolutions. I believe you will select from a menu to either convert everything to 720p or 1080i or to pass through the native resolution.

    Regards
    Tim
     

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