Agonising over HDMI output

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by Sid and Coke, Jan 3, 2007.

  1. Sid and Coke

    Sid and Coke
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    My Partnering Equipment: LG 37LC2D 37" LCD tv and a Sky+ Box.

    I am on the lookout for a new DVD recorder. I have upto £350 to spend on this new component.
    I would prefer the DVD recorder to also have Coaxial digital audio output so that i can connect it to my Hi-Fi CD recorder ( Tascam CD-RW900 ) which is in the next room, although i can use Optical digital out too.

    My Quandry is about the HDMI output. How much better is it than the other formats , e.g. Scart, component, Svideo, etc, etc.

    As my TV has the HDMI input it makes sense to me ( after reading all the hype) to use this connection, however are the differences really that noticable. I'm not bothered about functionality as it is only a few button pushes, it is the actual quality of the picture I'm bothered about ( if I'm being honest I probably don't watch that many movies on DVD anyway :rolleyes: )

    Not having to specify HDMI on my new DVD recorder would open up a whole raft of other players to choose from that do have the Coaxial digital audio output that i want....

    I have about 20 IE windows open at the moment trying to choose between different DVD Rec's and am getting bogged down with all the choice, Models that I like the look of so far include Toshiba RDXS25, Phillips DVDR-3380, Toshiba D-R160, Sony RDRHX525S, Sony RDR-GX120.
    please help.

    My most basic requirements are:

    i) DVD recorder ( just DVD or HDD as well, it doesn't matter)
    ii) Good picture Quality
    iii) Stereo PCM Digital Audio output ( coaxial prefered )
     
  2. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
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    Analogue RGB and component are usually just as good as HDMI in terms of viewing experience or quality.
    Most source material currently available (especially if recorded from satellite , cable or terrestrial TV) wouldn't be broadcasted at sufficient quality to gain any advantage.
    It might be worthwhile for some high definition material - but you aren't talking abut HiDef recorders anyway.
    HDMI adds audio capability but similar arguments apply here - stereo optical should be fine (even if I might upset the odd "golden ears" with that comment) . I doubt whether you'll be recording in DD5.1 or better anyway.
    So go with your emotions and ignore the HDMI ; things might be different in 3 years time but I think you'll be looking for a new recorder by then.

    Chris Muriel, Manchester
     
  3. lasitha

    lasitha
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    I have a Panasonic EX-75 and the picture quality via HDMI is slightly better (brighter colours and sharper image). It also has digitial optical output. Picture quality is excellent.
     
  4. Sid and Coke

    Sid and Coke
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    Thanks for the replies, i think i am not going to agonise any further, I'll just choose a player that has all of the basics that i'm looking for. I think it was the fact that my TV has a HDMI input made me think that i wanted to use it, However I've been happily usng it with my ols cheap Sony DVD Player all afternoon via a fully wired Cheapo SCART lead :) also to put it all in further context one of my very good friends and work buddies bought the same TV about a month before me, he has coupled his up with one of them £17 Tesco 'Blue Stripey' DVD players and uses it as a 2nd TV in a Conservatory and was saying how good he thought it was despite the modest price :)
     
  5. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    It's for precisely this reason the manufacturers have released new models with HDMI as people are longing to connect something to the all new "HDMI" socket in the belief of high definition for low definition TV, and will replace their current DVD players/recorders with new models.

    It's crazy having HDMI with standard definition, and the manufacturers will be keen to point out that when all the HD-DVD and Blu-Ray players/recorders start flooding the market and they want us to upgrade, again!

    I am sure for a lot of people it will give them a good improvement buy only because it means there setup isn't running on a 3 wire SCART cable that only feeds the TV composite video, but at a cost no doubt of around £50.00 for a triple screened oxygen free copper and 24 caret hard gold plated HDMI cable sold to them by the shark of a salesman who will earn more commission on the "accessories" than on the main unit.:rolleyes:

    Regards

    Phil
     
  6. Beeem

    Beeem
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    So, is there a noticeable difference in picture and sound quality between RGB scart and non-RGB scart connections?

    All this takes me back to my Amateur Photographer reading days when camera lenses were compared using scientific instrumentation to measure resolution, and there was little or no discernable difference using the naked eye.

    I wonder if a lot of the, "this one's better than that one", hype is psychological. If you've got the best kit it convinces you that you've got the best picture. Also, doesn't personal preference have a lot to do with it?
     
  7. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    Composite is the worst as it mixes up the colour and detail, no question, avoid at all costs! Definitely easy to tell you are watching composite, no scientific equipment required.:thumbsup:

    S-Video/RGB, interlaced component and interlaced HDMI are all very close and everyones mileage will vary. The argument HDMI is all digital so must be better is often used, yet some TV's convert HDMI to analogue component the moment it enters the back [some Sony's for one]! I can't see the difference in a blind viewing, they all look good.

    Component progressive/HDMI progressive from commercial film DVD's is the best, this is visually noticeable on any progressive scan TV.

    All my opinion, I know a lot will disagree.


    Yes absolutely, when it comes down to things that are very close in what they do then a lot of it is psychological and personal preference, also marketing plays a big part!

    Regards

    Phil
     
  8. maldonian

    maldonian
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    Hi Phil

    I would only question the inclusion of S-Video. Other than that you put it well.

    S-Video consists of the same full bandwidth luminance and narrow bandwidth chrominance signals as composite video, the difference being that the luma and chroma are carried separately in s-video and combined in composite video. So you don't get the mixing up of colour and detail, as you put it, with s-video. However the narrow chrominance bandwidth of s-video (only 1.3MHz in the case of PAL) makes it inferior to RGB and 'component'. It doesn't look quite as bad as this suggests because when it's decoded into the red, green and blue components needed by the display tube or panel, part of each one comes from the wideband luminance - a significant part in the case of green. Also, the eye is less aware of colour resolution than black and white.
     
  9. Sid and Coke

    Sid and Coke
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    I am almost on the verge of making a decision :)

    All of your comments have helped and my list of players that i am looking at grew and then shrunk as i dismissed sevral for dffernt reasons.

    The Toshiba D-R160 has Progressive Scan, Component Video output and a coaxial digital output. It is one of the cheapest Recorders on my list but ticks a lot of boxes for me - apart from HDMI wuich isn't an issue now anyway - any reason why this shouldn't be a prime contender for my money.
     

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