Aerial in the loft space?

stevegreen

Well-known Member
Now that Film4 is on freeview I have decided to stick a freeview box in the cinema room.

So, I was looking for a new aerial to stick in the loft. This will run two freeview boxes, one in the cinema room, one in the bedroom.

Would I need a high gain aerial such as this one for a loft position?

I have a full signal strength from my current outside aerial so I know the signal is reasonable, even from a little indoor aerial (set top type) I managed a very limited signal.
 
B

big s

Guest
stevegreen said:
Now that Film4 is on freeview I have decided to stick a freeview box in the cinema room.

So, I was looking for a new aerial to stick in the loft. This will run two freeview boxes, one in the cinema room, one in the bedroom.

Would I need a high gain aerial such as this one for a loft position?

I have a full signal strength from my current outside aerial so I know the signal is reasonable, even from a little indoor aerial (set top type) I managed a very limited signal.
I have built in freeview with my super duper tv on a full digital aeriel in my loft and i cant get half the channels on it.On the other hand my tv in the bedroom with built in freeview is working of a pishy indoor aerial and receiving the lot. I can only conclude that the aerial is less important than the quality of the tuner, and it is indeed the tuner which will determine what you receive
 

mentsugi

Active Member
I agree, the tuner can be very important. I have two Freeview DVDR's running off the same loft aerial and the Sony DVDR receives all channels but the Panny is still missing a few?
 

JayCee

Distinguished Member
big s said:
I can only conclude that the aerial is less important than the quality of the tuner, and it is indeed the tuner which will determine what you receive
I believe roof/loft insulation panels are sometimes constructed with a thin metallic sheeting sandwiched between them which reduces the signal strength more than anything.
 

stevegreen

Well-known Member
JayCee said:
I believe roof/loft insulation panels are sometimes constructed with a thin metallic sheeting sandwiched between them which reduces the signal strength more than anything.
All our loft insulation is on the floor so that won't be an issue thankfully. I think it's a suck it and see situation.
 

bob1

Well-known Member
stevegreen said:
All our loft insulation is on the floor so that won't be an issue thankfully. I think it's a suck it and see situation.
Good idea all the guessing in the world won't tell you if its going to work,i have two aerials in the loft and both work well with freeveiw.
 

SamRadford

Novice Member
stevegreen said:
I have a full signal strength from my current outside aerial so I know the signal is reasonable
Doh... if your aerial is working, why do you need another? Just connect your existing aerial feed to a 2-output masthead amplifier in the loft and cable it to your TVs or Freeview box(es). Why add complications?

Example: http://www.satcure.co.uk/tech/amps.htm#masthead
 

stevegreen

Well-known Member
SamRadford said:
Doh... if your aerial is working, why do you need another? Just connect your existing aerial feed to a 2-output masthead amplifier in the loft and cable it to your TVs or Freeview box(es). Why add complications?

Example: http://www.satcure.co.uk/tech/amps.htm#masthead
Getting useable power to the loft to run an amplifier would be a massive problem for me, plus there is not a long enough run of cable to connect to the existing aerial (its right over the other side of the house). Easier to spend £30-50 and stick a new aerial in the loft :)
 

SamRadford

Novice Member
stevegreen said:
Getting useable power to the loft to run an amplifier would be a massive problem for me
The power goes up the coaxial cable from the TV room.

But I accept your other excuse. :rolleyes:
 

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