1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

AE700 works fine... except with Star Wars DVDs!

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by joffonon, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. joffonon

    joffonon
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    Messages:
    105
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    Westcliff-on-Sea, Great Britain
    Ratings:
    +2
    Thanks to Ben, I got my AE700 yesterday. As a projector newbie, I have to say I'm so glad I plumped for this one, as the out-of-the-box quality is just stunning. :thumbsup: No dead pixels, no vertical banding to my eye, and certainly no screendoor. I tweaked the flicker settings on the service menu after it had been running for an hour or so, but only minor adjustment was required (no more than one or two notches up or down on each colour adjustment).

    But, I have a problem that's annoying; naturally, the first DVD I tried out was Star Wars (Region 1), from a cheap-and-cheerful Sony DVP-NS305 player, whose RGB SCART output works perfectly on my 32" TV. The menu screens look fine, but as soon as I start the film itself there is flickering horizontal interference that renders it unwatchable. Go back to the menu screens, and all is well again. The same is true of the other two films in that set. The other Region 1 DVD I had to hand worked fine (THX-1138), as did a Region 2 DVD (a Doctor Who disc) and the RGB SCART output of a Sky+ box. I couldn't test any more discs as they're piled up elsewhere in the house awaiting shelving to be fitted this week!

    The problem goes away if I change the DVD player's SCART output to 'Video' (I'm guessing composite), but obviously the picture isn't quite as good as RGB (though still watchable).

    Am I right in guessing that there is some sort of copy protection on the Star Wars DVDs that is causing this RGB problem? I've heard of the problems Macrovision can cause projectors, but it surprises me that THX-1138 isn't similarly protected. Unless there's some sort of new protection on the Star Wars discs.

    Grateful for any opinions. Fortunately, I'm planning to go down the PC route anyway, so the annoyance should hopefully be only short term, but it's still annoying nevertheless! :confused:

    Jonathan
     
  2. Darwock

    Darwock
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hang on, what sort of problems do PJs have with macrovision? That's ridiculous if it's true.
     
  3. jerab

    jerab
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    i had the same problem as you when i popped the first dvd into the just-out-of-the-box 700, it was a Moulin Rouge region 2. I used the scart that was previously attached to my cable box. I was horrified to see the distortion :eek:

    I thought to myself this can't be right so went straight down to richer sounds the next day and got myself an expensive component cable. The picture is now stunning and the colour is vivid :rolleyes:
    I guess it was money well spent.

    Jeremy
     
  4. KraGorn

    KraGorn
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2003
    Messages:
    4,740
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    68
    Location:
    Warrington
    Ratings:
    +27
    AFAIK Macrovision screws-up the recording of analog signals by a VCR etc, not their playback on a display ... I don't see Macrovision is the cause of your problems here.
     
  5. Liam @ Prog AV

    Liam @ Prog AV
    Well-known Member AVForums Sponsor

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2002
    Messages:
    8,498
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Kent
    Ratings:
    +827
    I wouldn't jump to too hasty a decision to discount macrovision as the cause. IIRC it works by sending pulses in the blanking portion of a signal to throw video/DVD/HDD recorders. Unfortunately this pulse throws the Automatic Gain Control circuits (constantly adjusts the input signal to keep at optimum output level) which are used by recorders, but can also be found in some displays. This is usually fine and I don't think it that likely to be the cause, but it still might be worth giving the Keene macrovision blocker a quick try just in case...
     

Share This Page

Loading...