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AE200 Sucking away the heat ?

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Tempest, Nov 10, 2003.

  1. Tempest

    Tempest
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    My mind had been working again (not always a good sign!) :D

    This thought came to be, and wondered what others views were on it.

    1: The AE200 (and poss many other projectors blow their heat out the back.

    2: You need to give plenty of distance between the projector and the rear wall to avoid heat build-up

    3: After a couple of hours with it running in a small room space with 1,2,3 people in the room there's gonna be a LOT of very hot air up there high in the room (projector sucking back in hot air)

    4: Many people with small rooms would like to position the projectors nearer to the rear wall.

    So......................

    How about this as an idea:

    From your local trade supplies merchant you can buy plastic ducting (a little like drainpipe but it's about 100mm wide and 50mm high. You can get straights and bends.

    So why not run a bit of straight into your loft (or wherever out the room) then where the rear of the projector is put a bend.
    The projectors outlet can be slid almost right up against this end of pipe.

    In the loft (or wherever) you connect some ducting to this ducting (you buy a convertor piece that converts the oblong into 4" dia pipe, and fit an electric fan (90 cuft.hr) and either leave it there, or carry the pipe on to the outside.

    So..... You have a fan running MIDWAY along the ducting that's creating a suction in the pipe that's sitting almost right up against the exhaust fan of your projector.
    Turn this fan on, then the projector and any heat it instantly sucked away out of the room and vented where you like.

    Total cost probably less than £30 with a bit of DIY and you are taking most of the heat away out of the room.

    As it's creating a vacume (albeit slight) in the room you will be sucking fresh air into the room (under doors etc) which would be cooler. Hence it seems a win win situation, and you could probably have your projector only a few inches away from the rear wall.

    As this new fan (approx 90 cu/ft hour) is in the loft (or wherever) then there should be no noise penalty.

    What you think ?????????????
     
  2. ShinObiWAN

    ShinObiWAN
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    Seems like a lot of trouble for the less DIY inclined but the idea is sound.

    I'm kinda stuck though since the AV room in our house is in the loft!
     
  3. Stinja

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    Surely it would be easier to make a heat-sink type of arrangement?

    So place a metal plate to the rear of your PJ, this is connected via a metal pole to a water reseviour in the ceiling. If it does get hot enough to matter, it should draw the heat away - with the bonus of no moving parts.
     
  4. KraGorn

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    and a nice hot bath after watching the movie. :D
     
  5. docfeelgood

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    Do you always have a bath after a movie KRaGorn?

    Bet you've got some tissue paper beside your chair as well ;-)
     
  6. Seb1

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    I have been worrying about this also.

    I have no choice but to place the projector close to the rear wall, but it will be on a small side table, so I would have thought the heat will rise...

    I was think of placing a small desk fan near the projector to evacuate the hot air and keep the air flow fresh and in motion...Not sure if this is a dumb idea?!

    I can't believe you can do much damage, with at least some space at the back...

    I think people and myself are being too paranoid. Manuals are usaully full of ridiculous warnings. You just have to use common sense...
     
  7. Tempest

    Tempest
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    Well I must admit to being supprised about 2 things:

    1: The vent is on the back, when anyone with an ounce of brains would have thought "ohhh people might want to put it on a shelf so lets put the vent on the side"

    2: As the vent is on the back, there appears to be no mention in the manual about rear clearance!

    Just thinking after a LONG DVD (2 hours+) with say 3 people in a small room the air is gonna get pretty dam warm in the room.

    The idea of a neat plastic flu to suck the air away from the projector seems a good all round one.

    As I said the white oblong pipe (about 55x100mm) can be bought for about £2 - £3 a piece, and a Fan for less than £10.
    Bit of DIY and you have a neat hot air extraction unit.......

    Not 100% sure if I'm doing this yet (as still painting the room) but will decide soon, and will take photo's if I go this route.
     
  8. Goof

    Goof
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    I think you're enjoying the idea of building your entire house around this Pj, rather than watching the damn thing! ;)
     
  9. Crocodile JD

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    Yeh but you could always open the window a little!. Just adjust the ambient temperature as you would in any room when it gets too hot. As for clearance from wall I would have thought 200mm + would be ideal and less than 150mm would be pushing it.

    Cheers

    Croc
     
  10. MAD ANDY

    MAD ANDY
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    hmmm im a little worried now as Ive just purchased a sanyo projector which is going to be mounted on the ceiling of my understairs cupboard so that when not using it its away and when using it it just needs the door opening. The flat ceiling section is only about 1ft wide and then the back of the stairs slopes down at an angle. The projector will be a matter of a inches away from the left main wall, and a matter of inches away from the right sloping stairs, but it will be sucking in air from the left and blowing it out of the right towards the sloping area which is where I was hoping that this would be ok ie if it was the other way round I would be more worried. Looking in the instruction it mentions leaving at least 3m's either side of it :eek: how realistic is this???
     
  11. Jonathan100

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    How many people do they think have rooms that are at a minimum 6m wide? There can be no possible heat build up 3m away unless there is some sort of jet engine inside your projector.
     
  12. theritz

    theritz
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    It is likely that the projector was designed for use in conference rooms etc. - not as a home cinema projector in a domestic setting. If they're recommending that degree of free air around the pj, then there must be some reason behind it - it's a matter for yourself, but I wouldn't mount the projector in an enclosed space in this case - if it's your only option, then you should see if you can find some way of introducing ventilation to prevent heat build up.



    Sean G.
     
  13. Tempest

    Tempest
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    I know your joking :)

    Naaa, I'm only really thinking of fitting an extractor for the projector heat.

    I can't see any negative points for doing this at all.
     
  14. Tempest

    Tempest
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    Perhaps it's the engineer in me. :)

    Scenario = small room.
    Item in question = device blowing out hot air.
    Same device = needs cool air to intake.
    Answer = extract the hot air to the outside hence avoid heat build up.

    Looked at a nice in-line 4" fan which will pull over 160 cubic metres a hour of air down a tube and out the room.
    Even with this pretty good fan it's not gonna cost much to do.
    Probably not much more than the cost of painting the room.

    I'm looking at this long term as with this ducting I want to be able to put this right up to the hot air outlet of any projector I buy.

    It will be sucking any hot air away from the device and out the room the instant it's on.

    Seems ideal for a small area.

    Will start this next week perhaps.
     
  15. LTJ

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    Hello. I've posted several times around the issue of keeping a PTAE100 cool (especially during those hot summer months we had this year).
    I won't bore you with all the details, but suffice to say that getting plenty of "air" around the pj is always a very good idea.
    Another approach that I've found "really does the job" is a ...wait for it........HOT WATER BOTTLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.
    Seriously a hot water bottle filled with cold tap water, placed over the lamp housing area of the top of the PJ casing will keep the device running cooler.

    I know in previous post that Sean has expressed concerns over condensation issues, but believe me it's not a concern.
    To raise the temperature of the water within the bottle to that off the temp found on the surface of the plastic casing of the pj100 is nigh immpossible. So therefore the heat dispelled by the lamp is trying to heat the volume of water within the bottle. After several hours use, you'll will find that the water in the bottle is barely luke warm and the surface area around the lamp housing will be warm at worst..

    I realise that some folk will shoot this down, and it does seem odd/foolhardy putting water so near your delicate expensive PJ, but believe me those hot-water bottles are tough devices.Mine has never leaked . Water is a far better cooling medium than air hence a whole science of water cooling devices in mechanics, engineering and electronics. Look at the pC overclockers. They are using water cooling for processors.

    So just try it. It's very inexpensive (couple of quid for the bottle)After a marathon session you can take the bottle up to bed with you (joking it won't get that hot)

    Remember just cold tap water. Do the thing up tightly, place as much of the bottle over the top off the PJ's lamp housing area.
    You'll be very impressed with the reults. Believe me it takes a hell of an amount of energy to get that water warmed up. Why you can just leave the bottle there! Let it cool back down to room temp until the next session.

    All the best.
    Lawrence
     
  16. Tempest

    Tempest
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    LJT........

    Well, I must admit I'd have never of thought about this idea :)

    I can fully understand your logic here and as you say there's no way all that water can be heated up and it will soak up any heat produced.

    I'd not entirely sure (perhaps someone can clarify this PLEASE) that cooling the outside case will actually make any difference to the bulb life/temperature.

    I could understand if you were pumping in (say air conditioned) air into the INLET. though I suppose anyone would accept that any form of cooling anywhere on the device is a good thing.

    I'm not sure how this would work if the device is on a ceiling mount (upside down)

    Pushing things to extream as per usual, I'd like to find a THINNER bag for the water than a hot water bottle. :)
     
  17. WeirdFish

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    If theres a prize for bizarre thread of the month, this has got to be a contender.

    :D
     
  18. ShinObiWAN

    ShinObiWAN
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    I think you've got you're condensation theory the wrong way round. Condensation doesn't form on hot surfaces.

    Condensation is formed when hot air comes into contact with cold surfaces. Take a look in your fridge, see the ice?

    Another example would be a cold glass of water. Condensation is formed on the outside.

    So...

    With the water bottle containing cold liquid, won't the hot air vapour condense as its cooled by the lower temperature of the water bottle and form as water?

    I wouldn't do this anyway. Don't like the thought of water inside my PJ.
     
  19. LTJ

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    Tempest. I refered to my post from earlier this year.
    In those post I explained an extra fan filtering system.
    This comprises of a PC fan fan, small power supply cardboard or plastic tubing. Put a sponge/foam filter over end off tube use fan to suck air through filter and feed air stream into input fan of PJ.
    So you should get a boost to the air flow(increased cooling) and the air flow is filtered, pre the pj filter. Only set back extra fan noise which hasn't really bothered me you can purchase super-duper quit fans.
    I have to say though the (hot) water bottle is a far simpler approach. actually I'm using both plus two Maplin heat sinks and a base with a cut out to promote greater air flow.
    Yes I realise that the bottle alone only rest against the plastic casing (which incidently used to run unbearably hot before aforementioned solutions) but I thought the physics of the heat loss into the fluid (water bottle) must surely be benificial to the area around the lamp thus allowing fast heat loss as the water tries to match the immediate heat from the lamp manifested in the plastic casing.

    All of the above is very crude and very "heath Robinson"but I believe to be sound physics and of course can be refined andv sophisticated.
    Ideally a water jacket around the lamp housing woud be ideal.

    Now I wonder what the response in the motor industry was when some suggested an electric fan to cool the engine as opposed to the belt driven version.
     
  20. LTJ

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    ShinObiWAN
    Yes I agree with your condensation rationale.
     
  21. LTJ

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    Tempest

    The cooling effect should be as pronounced from the under side of the PJ (Top in your case) as the top(bottom in your case).
    I suppose that if you can get enough room to get the bottle on the top(bottom) of your PTAE200 over the lamp housing area which should now be the rear right hand side. You can just leave there and try it. Of course it's very important not to cover any air intakes or vents. The panny's blow out the back of course.

    Your idea of the tube feeding filtered air from the loft or allowing air to flow upwards from the room through this vent thus creating a better cooling flow through the panny is sound.

    Filtered air from the loft is better though. That way the extra fan and subsequent noise would be shunted out of harms way. A filtered air flow to the panny's intake would be far preferable that all the smoke dead human skin dust and heat rising up the the cieling and then be sucked ito the panny raising the temp and depositing eventually skin dust and smoke over the 40 odd glass surfaces within the pj's light path to final lens (big hobby horse off mine)
     
  22. kotlewm

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  23. Tempest

    Tempest
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    Wow..... That sure is one "Boxed In" projector.

    Yes, he's doing the same as my idea, although my design would be a lot more precise than just a 4" pipe pointing in the general direction.

    There is a lovely ready made piece of white ducting that goes from the ducting size of approx 100x50mm round a 90' bend and into a 100mm dia round hole. You could fit this right up against the output of I'd guess most projectors and with a good fan somewhere along the pipework it would suck all the projector heat away from it instantly.

    The idea of filtering input air (above) sounds great, though more complicated than just dumping hot air.
    Excellent, but one thing at a time :)
     
  24. MAD ANDY

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    sorry my mistake, it said 3' ie 1m either side, now on the cold side there will be a few inches, and on the hot side about 7 or 8 ft but sloping downwards as it will be under the stairs. Will this be ok, or will the heat just rise up the slope back to where the hot air is being expelled and cause problems cos I have no other choice of location to mount it unfortunately :(
     

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