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AE100 - better results with different filters? - eg neutral density + 2

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by am1001aauk, Jul 23, 2003.

  1. am1001aauk

    am1001aauk
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    I saw this very interesting thread on the avs forums.

    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?s=&threadid=279972

    Here's a key part:

    " applied two 67mm filters to my PT-L300U -- a Neutral Density Filter +2 from wolf/ritz camera (you can buy it online) and a (this is a little hard to find) Kodak CC05M filter.
    These two filters do the following: the CC05M filter is like the FL-D filter so so often used in that it blocks some of the green and lowers the black level a small amount. When you add the Neutral Density +2 filter, which is light gray, it cuts light output and increases contrast somewhat.
    The result is a dramatic improvement in black levels"

    Based on the advice from folks in this forum I have added a Hoya HMC FLD filter to my AE100 and think its a good improvement.

    But I still find the picture to be a bit bright actually.

    So if the CC05M is like the FLD (which I have put on) - does anyone know a filter this is 'neutral density + 2' from

    http://www.2filter.com/prices/catalog.html

    I used them for the FLD filter - top service.

    Going by the thread on avs - the combination of the two gives the best results. I'd like to reduce the overall brightness a bit more (there's a lot of light from the screen on the walls etc). I think a more dark image will improve things for me.
     
  2. gingercat

    gingercat
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    :lesson: Correct me if I'm wrong (it does happen), but the whole point of a neutral density filter is that it cuts colours equally across the board, essentially just reducing the amount of light passing through. This means that it can't actually affect the contrast of the image in a beneficial way, everything will just get darker - it may even result in lower contrast for darker regions. Yes, black levels will improve, but white levels will deteriorate too!
     
  3. Mr.D

    Mr.D
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    Human visual system is more sesitive to density variation in the lower end of the intensity scale and less so in the upper regions. Video and film are alos designed to take adb=vantage of this fact. If you drop the light level across the board although the entire intensity scale is dropped : human being will percieve an increase in picture dynamism. There is a limit to how far you can go with this as you will start to crush together the lower intensities at soem point . On the AE100 I doubt you can get the black level down to 0 without seriously compromising the image but there is the potential to use filters to produce a beneficial improvement out of the box.

    The rationale behind the FLD usage is that teh ae100 ( and other LCD proejctorss) tend to have plenty of oomph in the green area of the spectrum because of the bulls used) and less in the red and blue. By employing the FLD filter your aim is to knock back the overall brightness predominately in the green but leave the red and blue as unaffected as possible.

    Its not perfect and even with correction to the RGB levels after applying the filter there will be some colour innaccuracy ( although the ae100 isn't any more accurate without the filter in that regard anyway) however its the best way of knocking back the blackpoint and still leave a functional level of peak brightness available. Couple this with the behaviour of the visual system and video itself and you get a percieved improvement in black level and a corresponding perceptual improvement in dynamic range.
     

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