Advice please! Concrete my yard...

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Bilbob, Feb 3, 2009.

  1. Bilbob

    Bilbob
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    Lo all.
    I have a small back yard. It's pretty much used as a yard, but I also keep my bike in it, in a small shed. Now the concrete in the yard has cracked, water puddles have formed and I have decided that it is time to repair it.

    My old man reckons I'll be fine just dumping a load (?!!) all over it, reckoning on about 1 cubic metre of concrete. Question is, is this going to be ok? Also, how to lay it? Do I lay the wooden blocks at the edge to 'case' it in then dump the 'crete in it, filling in the edges after it's set?

    It's an area approx 3x4 metres, and I intended to put a further 3-4 inches on top of it.
     
  2. Bilbob

    Bilbob
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    Oh, and how much does ready mix cost?
     
  3. Billo

    Billo
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    Just two things to remember
    One, it should have a slight fall on it to drain away from the house
    Two, make sure that 3 or 4 inches does not take it up to, or over, the main Damp Proof Membrane. These were the problems I inherited when I bought my first house.
     
  4. Bilbob

    Bilbob
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    Yeah, need to remember about the damp proof... I was going to have the 'crete drain towards the house and into the drain... but I suppose it might as well drain away...!!

    Any other pointers or ideas?
     
  5. cufbert

    cufbert
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    your concrete needs to be min 4" thick or it could end up cracking .try not to lay it if the weather is very freezing as the water in it can freeze.the surface of the concrete should lay a minimum of 150 mm below the dpc level(building regs) you will need to form some sort of shuttering around the concrete before it is poured.bare in mind the concrete is heavy,so the shuttering needs to be reasonably secure and will give you a neat edge.price? not sure,i usually mix my own its a lot cheaper,but hard work (with a mixer obviously)
     
  6. jamiesdad

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    Hi billbob used to drive a mixer but it was a few years ago:D

    I would recommend breaking out the old concrete :((sorry ) and starting from fresh :D

    pouring new concrete on top of old doesn't give a good join

    However if this is not possible as has been mentioned the damp-proof is important :)

    I would recommend shuttering as this makes screeding easier ( but its hard to say for sure without seeing your yard)

    I would say that one cube doesnt seem enough. If you are going for ready mix take your measurements to the supplier and they will work out how much you should need

    When I supplied ready mix it was about £70 per cube( but that was 18 years ago sorry )

    Oh and be prepared with everything ready for the delivery as most companies will only give you so much standing time before charging you:thumbsdow

    And one more thing if you do use shuttering make sure it is very secure as i have seen lots of shuttering collapse as there is alot of weight behind concrete being poured

    Regards
     
  7. Bilbob

    Bilbob
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    Mixing my own... I looked at this, but the quantites required for 1cube is massive! I think it worked out at about 3 metric tons of stuff!! Is that right???

    As for laying it on old... If I break up and remove the old stuff, it will be laid on a wet, clay-ey soil... will this be ok to lay on? Is it really necessary to remove the old stuff? I appreciate it won't bond that well to the old, but it will be a real git of a job to break up and remove the old...

    Cheers for the input so far all!
     
  8. jamiesdad

    jamiesdad
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    Hi billbob

    It is hard To offer "concrete" advice (sorry couldn't help it) with out seeing your yard but if you did break it out you would probably need to but a hardcore base down(adding to cost)

    You are about right with the quantities if you were to self mix :eek: I still think I metre is a conservative estimate but as i have said it has been a long time
     
  9. jamiesdad

    jamiesdad
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    Billbob

    Just don't do what one customer that i delivered did .I poured a couple of cube in a pile on some polythene for him and he decided to spread it the next day:eek::eek::eek::eek:

    I discovered this when i delivered a second load a couple of weeks later :D:D

    Cheers
     
  10. jendo

    jendo
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    lmao, what a **** :rotfl::rotfl:
     
  11. eric pisch

    eric pisch
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    its probably cracked because the base is not suitable, laying over the top as mentioned will probably cover the dpm course on the house and will be very hard to stop it cracking again

    to do it properly in needs to be broken out, if its poured on soil then that ground needs to be compacted, a decent base layer provided (compacted hardcore/type one) and then concreted over the top.

    so how annoying are the puddles :)
     
  12. Ned Senior

    Ned Senior
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    Not as annoying as the one I woke up in this morning... Damned Kids!!!
     
  13. Bilbob

    Bilbob
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    I think it's cracked just due to age, and probably some movement of the clay soil under it. It was clearly never a great job to begin with. Where I've run my bike over it over the last few years, it has obviously increased the cracks, and as water has got in and frozen cracked it more, then bike runs over it, pushes the little broken bits down...!!
    I agree it seems that digging the lot out would be the best plan, but if I can lay over the top and get a good few years out of, then I'd be happy with that...!
     
  14. IronGiant

    IronGiant
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    It probably depends on whether it's stable enough to act as in-situ hardcore, or if it is actually moving, whether it's a good idea to just cover it up.
    Dave
     
  15. lizap

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    as stated without seeing the existing slab its hard to say why its cracked, but if you are intent on pouring new over old ( isn't right but this is DIY were talking here ) i would install a 'slip membrane' between the two. all this needs to be is some 1200g polythene or similar laid on the old first. all this will do is allow the new slab to expand and contract independently and will also reduce the possibility of the cracks in the old affecting the new.

    hope this helps
     
  16. Bilbob

    Bilbob
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    It appears that seeing it quite relevant...!
    I shall take a photo tomorrow...

    Cheers all!
     

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